Policies, Regulations and Forms


1 | Procedural Bylaw

1.0       MEETINGS

1.1       GENERAL

1.1.1     The quorum for a meeting of the Board shall be a majority of Trustees holding office at that time.

1.1.2     A Trustee may participate in a meeting by telephone if the Trustee is unable to be physically present at the meeting.

1.1.3     A Trustee who participates in a meeting by telephone shall be deemed present at the meeting and shall be counted for the purposes of determining quorum and voting.

1.1.4     If a Trustee participates in a meeting by telephone, there shall be telephone apparatus at the site of the meeting, which permits the Trustee participating by telephone to hear all discussion by all Trustees and permits all Trustees to hear all comments by the Trustee participating by telephone.

1.1.5     Meetings of the Board will be held at the School Board Office unless the Chairperson gives notice on the written notice of meeting and agenda or the Board otherwise resolves.

 

1.2       INAUGURAL MEETINGS

1.2.1     The Board shall meet by the first Tuesday after the term of office begins at the same time as for a regular meeting.  In the event that the inaugural meeting falls on the second Tuesday of the month, then the regular meeting shall be held on the third Tuesday of that month.

1.2.2     The Chairperson of the Inaugural meeting shall be the Secretary-Treasurer until such time as the Board Chairperson has been elected.

1.2.3     The interim Chairperson shall announce results of Trustee elections and confirm that new Trustees have completed the Declaration and Oath of Allegiance as required by the School Act, following which the Board Chairperson shall be elected.

1.2.4     The interim Chairperson shall call for nominations for Board Chairperson and conduct a vote by ballot in which that person receiving a clear majority shall be elected Board Chairperson.  If no person receives a clear majority, further ballots shall be taken until the same is achieved or, if a tie shall occur, the election shall be decided by drawing of lots.

1.2.5     Following the election of Board Chairperson, the newly elected Board Chairperson shall assume the chair and the order of business shall be:

1.2.5.1  Election of Vice-Chairperson;

1.2.5.2  Election or appointment of BCPSEA Representative and Alternate;

1.2.5.3  Election or appointment of BCSTA Representative and Alternate

            1.2.6     The election of Vice-Chairperson shall be conducted in the same manner as the election of Chairperson.

            1.2.7     The Board Chair may choose to assign Trustees to Committee and to Schools.

 

1.3       REGULAR MEETINGS

 

1.3.1     A regular meeting shall be held at least once a month on the second Tuesday of the month at 7:30 p.m. in months that school is in session or upon such other day or at such other hour as the Board may decide.  Additional meetings shall be held as the Board may decide. 

 

1.3.2     At the appointed time for commencement of a meeting the presiding officer shall ascertain that a quorum is present before proceeding to the business of the meeting.  If a quorum has not been made within one-half hour after the appointed time, the meeting shall stand adjourned until the next regular meeting date or until another meeting shall have been called in accordance with these Bylaws.

 

After a meeting has commenced, if notice is drawn to a lack of quorum, the presiding officer shall ascertain whether there is a lack of quorum and, if so found, adjourn the meeting to a time certain or to the next regular meeting date, at his/her discretion.

 

1.3.3     The order of business at all regular meetings, unless varied by motion, shall be as follows:

1.3.3.1              Adoption of Agenda;

1.3.3.2              Receiving Delegations;

1.3.3.3              Approval of Minutes of Prior Meetings;

1.3.3.4              Necessity of Closed Meeting and Agenda if Required;

1.3.3.5              Correspondence;

1.3.3.6              Superintendent of School's Report;

 

 

1.3.3.7              Secretary Treasurer’s Report;

1.3.3.8              Reports of Committees;

1.3.3.9              Adjourned Business;

1.3.3.10            New Business;

1.3.3.11                        Information Items;

1.3.3.12                        10Minute Question & Answer Period.

 

1.3.4     A change to the prescribed order of business may be proposed by a Trustee and shall require unanimous consent, without debate.

 

1.3.5     The agenda and notice of meetings shall be prepared by the Secretary-Treasurer under the direction of the Chairperson.  Written notice of each meeting, together with the proposed agenda, must be given at least 48 hours in advance to each Trustee by delivery to the place designated by him or her.

 

1.3.6     Minutes shall be kept by the Secretary of the Board of all proceedings passed at meetings of the Board, such minutes to be concise and to detail proceedings of the Board, but not the contents of speeches.  A copy of the minutes when approved shall be forwarded to the Ministry of Education.

 

1.3.7     All meetings shall stand adjourned at three hours after their commencement unless a Resolution is passed by a two-thirds majority to extend the hour of adjournment.

 

1.3.8     All meetings of the Board shall be open to the public and no person shall be excluded, except for improper conduct.  If in the opinion of the Board, the public interest so requires, the Board, by resolution, may order a meeting or part thereof to be closed.  The Board may exclude persons other than Trustees or persons other than Trustees and officers.

 

1.3.9     Petitions and delegations should:

 

1.3.9.1  be received in writing by the Secretary-Treasurer prior to the release of the agenda;

1.3.9.2  designate who the speaker or speakers are to be;

1.3.9.3  have a definite time limit placed on them.

 

            The Board's decision on the course of action to be followed in connection with the matter or matters presented will usually be delayed to a subsequent regular meeting.

 

 

1.3.10   The presiding officer may expel and exclude from a Board meeting any person whom she/he considers has been guilty of improper conduct.

 

1.4       SPECIAL MEETINGS

 

1.4.1     A special meeting of the Board may be called by the Chairperson or, upon written request of a majority of the Trustees, may be called by the Secretary-Treasurer.  No business other than that for which the meeting was called shall be conducted at the meeting. 

 

1.4.2     Written notice of a special meeting and an agenda shall be given to each Trustee at least 48 hours in advance of the meeting.  Delivery of a written notice and the agenda may be waived by a majority vote of the Board, provided all reasonable steps have been taken to notify all Trustees of the meeting.

 

1.5       CLOSED SESSION

 

1.5.1     If the Board has resolved pursuant to paragraph 1.3.8, the Board may convene a meeting without the public, or without the public and staff present, at which matters of a confidential nature shall be discussed.  No Trustee shall disclose to the public the proceedings of a closed meeting unless a Resolution has been passed at the closed meeting to allow disclosure. 

 

1.5.2     Minutes of a closed meeting shall be kept in the same manner as a regular meeting but shall be approved only by the Board in closed meetings and shall not be filed with the minutes of regular meetings. 

 

1.5.3     Pursuant to the School Act, a record of each closed meeting shall be kept available at all reasonable times for any person.  The record shall contain a general statement as to the nature of the matters discussed and the general nature of the decisions reached.

 

1.5.4     Unless otherwise determined by the Board, the following matters shall be considered in closed session:

 

1.5.4.1     Salary claims and

1.5.4.2     Accident claims and other matters where Board liability may arise;

1.5.4.3     Legal opinions respecting the liability or interest of the Board;

1.5.4.4     The conduct, efficiency, discipline, suspension, termination or retirement of employees;

1.5.4.5     Medical Examiners or examinations and medical reports;

 

 

1.5.4.6     Matters pertaining to individual students including the conduct, discipline, suspension or expulsion of students, truancy and indigent students;

1.5.4.7     Staff changes including appointments, transfers, resignations, promotions and demotions;

1.5.4.8     Purchase of real properly including the designation of new sites, consideration of appraisal reports, consideration of accounts claimed by owners, determination of Board offers and expropriation procedures;

1.5.4.9     Lease, sale or exchange of real property prior to finalization thereof;

1.5.4.10   Matters pertaining to the safety, security or protection of Board property;

1.5.4.11   Such other matters where the Board decides that the public interest so requires.

 

All other matters shall be considered in Public Session.

 

1.5.5     The agenda of each closed session shall have as an order of business "matters for disclosure".

 

2.         CHAIRPERSON AND PRESIDING OFFICERS

 

2.1       GENERAL

 

2.1.1     The Chairperson shall preside at all meetings of the Board but may vacate the Chair in order to enter debate or propose or second a motion.

 

2.1.2     The Vice-Chairperson shall preside in the absence of the Chairperson or when the Chairperson vacates the Chair.

 

2.1.3     In the event that neither the Chairperson nor the Vice-Chairperson is able or willing to take the Chair, the presiding officer shall be such person as the Board may elect for that meeting.

 

2.1.4     The Chairperson and the Vice-Chairperson shall be elected for a term of one year in December of each year, unless otherwise changed.

 

2.1.5     The presiding officer shall rule on all points of order and shall state the reasons and the authority for ruling when making a ruling.  The presiding officer's ruling shall be subject to appeal to the Board.  An appeal may only be requested immediately after a ruling and before resumption of business.

 

2.1.6     The Chairperson shall vote in accordance with paragraph 6.1.3.

 

2.1.7     The Chairperson normally acts as spokesperson for the Board to the media, community and schools.

 

3.         RULES OF ORDER

 

3.1       GENERAL

 

3.1.1     Where these Rules are silent and where not inconsistent with these Rules, Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised shall apply to the conduct of meetings, provided, further, that where both these Rules and Robert's Rules of Order Newly Revised are silent, the Standing Orders of the British Columbia Legislature shall be followed.  Where there is an inconsistency between these Rules and the School Act, the School Act shall apply over the Rule in question.

 

3.1.2     The Board may adopt a procedural Rule for one or more meetings by Resolution of a majority of two-thirds of the Trustees present at the meeting.  A Rule other than the requirement for notice of meetings may be suspended by unanimous consent of the Trustees present.

 

3.1.3     The Rules may be amended by Bylaw only, at a meeting of which notice of intention to propose the amendment has been given at the previous meeting.

 

3.1.4     The presiding officer's ruling on a point of order shall be based on Rules of Order as stated in paragraph 3.1.1 herein.

 

3.1.5     An appeal of a ruling of the presiding officer shall be decided without debate by a majority vote of Trustees present.  When an appeal is successful it does not necessarily set a precedent.

 

3.1.6     All questions shall be decided by a vote on motion.

 

4.         MOTIONS

 

4.1       GENERAL

 

4.1.1     Motions shall be phrased in a clear and concise manner so as to express an opinion or achieve a result.  A preamble does not form part of a Resolution when passed.

 

4.1.2     The presiding officer may divide a motion containing more than one subject if she/he feels this would produce a fairer or clearer result and the same shall be voted on in the form in which it is divided.

 

 

4.1.3     No motion other than to postpone consideration of a question, or a procedural motion, shall be repeated during the calendar year except by the reconsideration process.

 

4.1.4     All motions shall be seconded except in Committee.

 

4.1.5     All motions are debatable except the following:

 

4.1.5.1  Motion for adjournment of debate or for adjournment of a meeting unless such a motion contains a time for recommencement of debate or for a new meeting;

4.1.5.2  Motion to fix time for adjournment of a meeting;

4.1.5.3  Motion to proceed to the next meeting;

4.1.5.4  Motion to go into Committee of the Whole or closed session;

4.1.5.5  Motion to table;

4.1.5.6  Motion to recess;

4.1.5.7  Motion to suspend rules;

4.1.5.8  Motion to lift from the table;

4.1.5.9  Motion to move the previous question.

 

4.1.6     All motions shall be subject to amendment except the following:

 

4.1.6.1  Motion that the question be now put;

4.1.6.2  Motion for adjournment of debate or adjournment of a meeting;

4.1.6.3  Motion to table unless such a motion contains a date for further consideration of the matter tabled;

4.1.6.4  Motion to refer to Committee;

4.1.6.5  Motion to proceed to next business;

4.1.6.6  Motion to lift off the table;

4.1.6.7  Motion to reconsider;

4.1.6.8  Motion to postpone indefinitely;

4.1.6.9  Motion to suspend the rules.

 

4.1.7     An amendment to a motion does not require notice.  Only one amendment to an amendment shall be allowed and the same shall be dealt with before the amendment is decided.  Amendments must be strictly relevant to the main motion and not alter in a material way or be contrary to the principle embodied in the main motion.

 

 

4.2       RECONSIDERATION

 

4.2.1     A question may be reconsidered only if notice of a request for reconsideration has been given at the previous meeting and if reconsideration is approved by a 2/3 majority.

 

5.         DEBATE

 

5.1       GENERAL

 

5.1.1     Debate shall be strictly relevant to the question before the meeting and the presiding officer shall warn speakers who violate this Rule.

 

5.1.2     No Trustee shall speak until recognized by the Chairperson.

 

5.1.3     No person shall speak more than once to a question except the mover of a motion, who shall have the right to make a reply when all other Trustees who wish to speak have spoken.  No Trustee shall speak for a period in excess of five minutes at one time.  The Chairperson may caution a Trustee who persists in tedious and repetitious debate and may direct the Trustee to discontinue.

 

5.1.4     A matter of privilege (a matter dealing with the rights or interests of the Board as a whole or of a Trustee personally) may be raised at any time and shall be dealt with forthwith before resumption of business.

 

5.1.5     No Trustee shall interrupt another Trustee who has the floor except to raise a point of order or a point of privilege.

 

6.         VOTING

 

6.1       GENERAL

 

6.1.1     All Trustees present at a meeting must vote although a Trustee must abstain from voting in the event that he has a conflict of interest by reason of having a direct pecuniary interest in a vote.  A Trustee may also abstain from voting if reasons are stated.

 

6.1.2     Voting shall be by a show of hands and only the results recorded unless a Trustee requests recording of names.  Where names are recorded both positive and negative votes shall be recorded.

 

 

6.1.3     The Chairperson shall vote at the same time as the other members of the Board and, in the case of equality of votes for and against a motion, the question is resolved in the negative and the Chairperson shall so declare.

 

6.1.4     All questions shall be decided by a majority of the votes of the Trustees present and voting save as otherwise provided by these Bylaws or the School Act.

 

7.         COMMITTEES

 

7.1       GENERAL

 

7.1.1     The Chairperson shall appoint the members to each standing Committee at the first regular meeting in each year, or as soon thereafter as possible.

 

7.1.2     There shall be the following standing Committees:

 

District Improvement Team;

Policy Committee;

Finance & Building Committee;

Personnel Committee;

 

7.1.3     Members of the Board may attend meetings of any of its Committees and may be allowed to take part in any discussion or debate by permission of a majority of the Committee, but may not vote.

 

7.1.4     The rules applying in regular or special meetings shall be observed in Committee of the Whole and in standing Committees so far as they may be applicable except as to the requirement for seconding of motions and limiting the number of times of speaking.

 

            Speeches in Committee of the Whole must be strictly relevant to the item or clause under consideration.

 

7.1.5     On completion of deliberations on matters referred to it, a Committee shall report its findings to the whole Board.

 

7.1.6     The actions of a Committee shall not be complete until its report has been approved by the whole Board.

 

7.1.7     Committees will report to the Board of the proceedings of committee meetings.

 

 

7.2       SCOPE OF COMMITTEES

 

            7.2.3     Finance and Building Committee

 

            7.2.3.1  Membership: 

 

            The Committee will comprise of the following individuals:

 

                        7.2.3.1.1           Three Trustees;

                        7.2.3.1.2           Superintendent of Schools; and,

                        7.2.3.1.3           Secretary Treasurer.

 

            Other Trustees and staff may be in attendance.

 

            7.2.3.2  Recommendations.

 

            Decisions will be made by Trustee consensus.  When consensus is not reached, Trustees may bring alternate recommendations to the Board.

 

            7.2.3.3  Scope of Committee:

 

            The main responsibility of the committee is to prepare recommendations for School Board’s approval in the following areas:

 

            7.2.3.3.1           Seismic Capital Plan;

            7.2.3.3.2           Capital Plan;

            7.2.3.3.3           Annual Capital Grant Expenditures in excess of $50,000;

            7.2.3.3.4           Audited Financial Statements;

            7.2.3.3.5           Joint Use Agreements with External Groups; and,

            7.2.3.3.6           Repurposing of School Buildings.

            7.2.3.3.7           Audit Committee

 

            7.2.3.4. Audit Committee Function

 

The Finance & Building Committee shall serve as the Audit Committee for the District.  The Audit Committee’s principle function is to oversee the school district’s financial reporting process and its internal control structure, and report its findings to the Board.  This task is facilitated by asking questions about the quality of work done by management, participating in the audit planning and reporting process, understanding and reviewing the aspects of the operation that put the school district at risk and the district’s

 

preparedness to face that risk.  It summarizes its findings and recommendations so that the Board can make informed decisions. 

 

The Committee shall:

 

7.2.3.4.1 Review the audited financial statements and recommend approval of the audited statements by the Board;

 

7.2.3.4.2  Oversee the internal control structure with a focus on safeguarding district assets;

 

7.2.3.4.3  Review audit results with the external auditors and follow up on the implementation of the auditor’s letter of recommendations;

 

7.2.3.4.4  Review the nature and extent of other services provided by the external auditors in relation to auditor independence;

 

7.2.3.4.5  Monitor the development of and changes to accounting principles and practices and financial reporting standards and their impact on the school district’s financial reporting;

 

7.2.3.4.6  Oversee engagement of external auditors including the terms of the audit engagement and the appropriateness of proposed fees.

 

7.2.3.4.7  Meet with the external auditors at an Audit Committee meeting without staff members present for a portion of the meeting to obtain independent feedback from the external auditors to Board members.

 

            7.2.3.5  Meeting Schedule

 

            The Committee will meet monthly prior to each scheduled Board meeting.

 

 

 

8.         BYLAWS AND RESOLUTIONS

 

8.1       GENERAL

 

8.1.1     All matters shall be dealt with by Resolution or Bylaw.  A Resolution shall have only one reading but a Bylaw shall have three readings. 

 

8.1.2     The following matter shall only be resolved by Bylaw:

 

8.1.2.1  Amendments to Bylaws;

8.1.2.2  The rules of procedure of the Board and rules relative to the organization of meetings of the Board;

8.1.2.3  Regulation and control of the use of property owned and administered by the Board;

8.1.2.4  Where required by the School Act.

 

8.2       PROCEDURE ON BYLAWS

 

8.2.1     Before it is passed, a Bylaw of the Board must be given three distinct readings.

 

8.2.2     Subject to subsection 8.2.3, at each of the readings of a Bylaw, the Bylaw must be read in full.

 

8.2.3     A reading of a Bylaw may, if a written or printed copy of a Bylaw is in the possession of each trustee and is available to each member of the public in attendance at the meeting at which the Bylaw is to be read, consist of a description of the Bylaw by:

 

8.2.3.1  its title; and

8.2.3.2  a summary of its contents.

 

8.2.4     The Board shall not give a Bylaw more than two readings at any one meeting unless the members of the Board who are present at the meeting unanimously agree to give the Bylaw all three readings at that meeting.


1110 | Learning Resources Policy

RATIONALE
In accordance with the School Act and Ministry of Education Policy and Orders, the Board of Education is required to use either Ministry of Education Recommended Learning Resources or those learning resources approved through a district process. The purpose of this policy and the accompanying regulations is to clarify the roles and responsibilities of the Ministry of Education and the Board of Education regarding the evaluation and selection of learning resources.

POLICY
The Board supports resource-based learning and encourages teachers to utilize a range of educational media and resources. The Board supports Ministry of Education Policy regarding the use and selection of learning resources, as follows:

  • schools may use either Ministry of Education Recommended Learning Resources or those approved through a district process described in the regulations for this policy;
  • the Ministry of Education is responsible for evaluating and selecting learning resources to support Provincial curriculum;
  • challenges to Ministry recommended learning resources will be addressed by an Educational Resource Advisory Committee in accordance with Ministry of Education Policy; and
  • challenges to the use of district approved resources will be dealt with in accordance with the regulations for this policy.

The Board acknowledges that the primary objective of learning resources is to support, enrich, and help implement the education program. To this end, the Board affirms and supports learning resources that will:

  • take into consideration students' varied interests, abilities, backgrounds, and maturity levels;
  • stimulate development in factual knowledge, literary appreciation, aesthetic values, and ethical standards;
  • develop a sense of identity and belonging for Aboriginal learners and help to build Aboriginal understanding for all staff and students;
  • provide perspectives on various sides of controversial issues so that young citizens may have an opportunity to develop, under guidance, the practice of critical analysis and the ability to make informed judgments in their daily lives;
  • represent many religious, ethnic, and cultural groups and their contributions to our national heritage and the world community; and
  • place principle above personal opinion and reason above prejudice in order to assure a comprehensive, high quality collection of learning resources appropriate to the school community.

LEGISLATION/REGULATIONS
School Act, Section 168 (2) (e)
Ministerial Order 333/99: Education Program Guide Order
Ministry of Education Policy, Learning Resources: Withdrawal of Recommended Learning Resources (2000)
Ministry of Education Policy, Learning Resources: Provincial Approval Process (2002)
Ministry of Education Policy, Learning Resources: Challenges to the Use of Recommended Learning Resources (2002) 


1110-10 | Selection and Review of Instructional Materials

In general, the Regulation of the Board of Prince Rupert School District No. 52(Prince Rupert) is to provide those learning resources necessary to meet the educational needs of all students in the schools of the district.

Responsibility for selecting and using learning resources, and for presenting locally developed courses and texts for approval by the Board, rests with the Superintendent of Schools.  In addition, the Superintendent of Schools is responsible for seeing that the criteria and procedures contained in the accompanying regulations are known and applied.

CRITERIA FOR SELECTION OF LEARNING RESOURCES

I.   PREAMBLE

"Districts are encouraged to expand processes for the local selection of learning resources.  Under Minister's Order #143/89 districts are not limited to the use of provincially authorized or recommended resources.  However, should a School Board wish to purchase other than provincially authorized or recommended resources, it must establish evaluation and selection criteria and procedures to approve the use of these resources."

Learning Resources Funding 1995/1996

II.  OBJECTIVES OF SELECTION

A.  For the purposes of this Regulation, the term "learning resources" will refer to any material (whether acquired or locally produced) with instructional content or function that is used for formal or informal teaching/learning purposes.  Learning resources include software, video materials, CD ROM, laser discs, audio tapes, information series, print materials and manipulatives.

B.  The primary objective of learning resources is to support, enrich and help to implement the educational program of the school through the interaction of professional personnel and other members of the school community.  It is the duty of professional staff to provide students with a wide range of materials at varying levels of difficulty, with diversity of appeal and the presentation of different points of view.

C.  To this end, the Board of School Trustees of School District No. 52 affirms that it is the responsibility of its professional staff:

  • To provide materials that will enrich and support the curriculum, taking into consideration the varied interests, abilities, learning styles and maturity levels of the students served;
  • To provide materials that will stimulate growth in factual knowledge, literary appreciation, aesthetic values and societal standards;
  • To provide materials on various sides of controversial issues so that young citizens may have an opportunity to develop under guidance the practice of critical analysis and to make informed judgements in their daily lives;
  • To provide materials representative of the many religious, ethnic and cultural groups and their contributions to our national heritage and the world community;
  • To place principle above personal opinion and reason above prejudice in the selection of materials of the highest quality in order to assure a comprehensive collection appropriate to the school community.

 

III.  RESPONSIBILITY FOR SELECTION OF LEARNING RESOURCES

A.   The Board of School Trustees delegates the responsibility for the selection of learning resources to the professional staff employed by the school system.

B.  While selection of learning resources involves many people (administrators, teachers, students, community persons, resource centre personnel), the responsibility for coordinating the selection of school learning resources and making the recommendation for purchase rests with the School/District Administrative Officer after consultation with school and district staff.

C.   From time to time Sub Committees of District Committees will be struck, for resource selection, especially at the elementary level for the following reasons:

  • Uniformity of the main resources used within the district to accommodate the transitory nature of many of the students in Prince Rupert.
  • To ensure consistent programs throughout the district.
  • To ensure that schools with small staffs are not required to be responsible for several resource selections in one year.
  • District resource selection committees made up of both elementary and secondary representatives encourages the appropriate fit of elementary resources from elementary to secondary.

 

IV.  NOTES ON THE SELECTION OF LEARNING RESOURCES

A.   The following criteria should be used to the extent that each is appropriate to any given learning resource:

  1.  Other factors being equal, priority shall be given to a learning resource developed and produced in Canada.
  2.  Learning resources shall support and be consistent with the general educational goals of the province and district and the aims and objectives of individual schools and specific courses.
  3.  Learning resources shall meet high standards of quality in factual content and presentation.
  4. Learning resources shall be appropriate for the subject area and for the age, emotional development, ability level, learning styles and social development of the students for whom the materials are selected.
  5. Learning resources shall have aesthetic, literary and/or social values.
  6. Physical format and appearance of learning resources shall be suitable for their intended use.
  7. Learning resources chosen shall be developed by competent authors and producers.
  8. Learning resources shall be selected to help students gain an awareness of our pluralistic society as well as an understanding of the many important contributions made to our civilization by women, minority and ethnic groups.
  9. Learning resources shall be selected to motivate students and staff to examine their own attitudes and behaviors and to comprehend their own duties, responsibilities, rights and privileges as participating citizens in our society.
  10. Biased or slanted learning resources may be provided to meet specific curriculum objectives; for example, to recognize propaganda and its purpose in a given context.  Such resources shall have a statement on the inside cover outlining the intent of the resource and comments on appropriate use.  The placement of such statement is the responsibility of the school's Administrative Officer.

B.   The selection of learning resources on controversial issues will be directed towards maintaining a balanced collection representing various views. Learning resources shall clarify historical and contemporary forces by presenting and analyzing intergroup tension and conflict objectively, placing emphasis on recognizing and understanding social and economic problems that led up to the conflict.

C.   Emphasis will be placed on the selection of Canadian learning resources where appropriate.  These resources include book and non-book learning materials by or about a Canadian person, about a region or event, and/or published or produced in Canada.

D.   Some learning resources (e.g., novels) are authorized or recommended for use at a particular grade level.  Care should be taken to avoid extensive use of these resources at earlier grade levels.

E.   Recommendation for purchase of learning resources at the school level will be done by the School Based Implementation Team or Department, who will ensure that resources recommended for purchase meet present and future curricular needs of students, and are consistent with Ministry, district and school directions.

F.   Care should be taken to avoid duplication of learning resources already available in the school.

G.   Gift materials shall be judged by the criteria outlined and shall be accepted or rejected by those criteria.

H.   Selection is an ongoing process which should include the removal of materials which are no longer appropriate according to the criteria for the selection of learning resources.

 

V.  PROCEDURES FOR RECOMMENDING PURCHASE OF LEARNING RESOURCE MATERIALS NOT ON THE PROVINCIALLY AUTHORIZED OR RECOMMENDED LISTS

 A.   Teachers who are interested in having a school purchase learning resources that are not recommended shall seek the approval of the School Based Implementation Team/Department and Administrative Officer.

B.   The School Based Implementation Team/Department and Administrative Officer must be willing and able to support the use of the resource in the school.

C.   If the request is to purchase a class set of learning resources that are not provincially authorized or recommended, the Prince Rupert School District No. 52 form "Request for Approval to Purchase a Class Set of Learning Resources not Provincially Authorized or Recommended" must be filled out and forwarded to the appropriate District Administrative Officer in charge of elementary or secondary curriculum.

D.   The District Administrative Officer will either authorize the purchase or forward the request to the next Education Committee Meeting of the School Board.  A representative from the school should attend a Education Committee  Meeting to present their school's rationale for wishing to purchase the resource.  A decision will be made and the school will be advised by copy of a Board Motion.

E.   Orders for Special Education resources, including E.S.L., should be forwarded to the District Officer responsible for Special Education for approval.


1110-20A | Request for Approval to Purchase a Class Set of Learning Resources - Form

Reference Title View

Request for Approval to Purchase a Class Set of Learning Resources

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1110-30 | Review of Instructional Materials

In the event that an individual, or group, objects to the use of a particular learning resource in a school, the following procedure will be followed:

a)   The Administrative Officer of the school concerned will arrange to discuss the objection with the complainant, and the librarian and/or the teacher concerned.

b)   If the above discussion does not satisfy the complainant, the Administrative Officer will provide the complainant with a Request for Review of Instructional Materials form, instruct the complainant to complete the form and submit it to the Superintendent of Schools.

c)   The Superintendent of Schools will appoint a review committee consisting of an administrator, a school librarian, two teachers, a member of the public-at-large and a trustee.

d)   The committee will examine and consider the learning resources being objected to on the basis of:

  • overall purpose
  • timelines of permanence
  • importance of the subject matter
  • quality of the writing/production
  • authoritativeness
  • reputation and significance of the author 
  • format
  • appropriateness for age/grade level concerned
  • bias

e)   The committee will meet with all school personnel concerned with the objection and with the complainant to explain its findings.

f)   The recommendation of the committee will be forwarded to the Superintendent of Schools for submission to the Board of School Trustees.


1110-40A | Request for Review of Instructional Materials - Form

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Request for Review of Instructional Materials - Form

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1115 | Board Authority Authorized Courses Policy

Formerly:  Locally Developed Courses

RATIONALE/PURPOSE
The Ministry of Education encourages Boards of Education to offer locally relevant courses to meet the needs of schools and their communities while providing choice and flexibility for students.

Therefore, the Board of Education of School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) encourages the development of Board Authority Authorized courses to meet the particular needs of our community and students. 

 

POLICY
Schools may offer locally developed courses in conformity with the School Act and Ministry Policy (Board/Authority Authorized Courses, January 2004), and Board /Authority Authorized Courses.

Prior approval of the Board of Education is required before the course may be offered to students.

The Board is required to submit a BAA Course Form for new courses to the Ministry.   The Board must retain the full BAA Framework for review by the Ministry when requested.

Boards are required to submit to the Ministry of Education the course name of each Board/Authority Authorized Course (BAA) they plan to offer in the following school year.  

 

REFERENCE:
School Act Section 85 (2) (i), 168 (2) (b)
Ministry Policy (Board/Authority Authorized Courses, January 2004 and Updated 2011)
Regulation 1115-10 – Board Authorized Courses Regulation


1115-10 | Board Authority Authorized Courses

Formerly: Locally Developed Courses

1.0 Definition:

1.1 “Board Authorized Courses (BAA) courses” are offered to respond to the unique local needs of the schools and their communities while providing choice and flexibility for students.  These courses demonstrate planning, organization and sound    pedagogy.  BAA courses are authorized according to requirements set by the Ministry of Education.
 

2.0 Courses Eligible for Board/Authority Authorization:

2.1 BAA courses may be used as all or part of the elective credits students need to fulfill graduation requirements. 

2.2 In response to local needs and students interests the Board may authorize a broad variety of BAA courses focused on subject areas not offered through Ministry-developed courses. 

2.3 The Board may design ESL courses whose primary language is not Standard English and who may therefore require English as a second (or additional) language support so they may successfully access the BC curriculum.  These courses should not be remedial or modified versions of Ministry-authorized courses.

2.4 Grade 11 level BAA courses may be used to fulfill the Fine Arts/Applied Skills graduation requirement if they meet the outcomes of the Ministry-developed Grade 11 Fine Arts or Applied Skills Resources Packages.  Grade 10 and 12 BAA courses in the Fine Arts/Applied Skills subject areas do NOT meet the Fine arts/Applied Skills requirement. 

2.5 BAA courses may be developed to meet the needs of students with special needs (not to be confused with modified or adapted courses).  They may be developed for a variety of subjects or purposes such as social-emotional learning, to promote independence, or to develop employability skills.

2.6 The (Environmental) Sustainability Course Content Framework (2010) includes modules that might be used individually or as an entire BAA course.  Modules can be adapted into existing BAA course such as in the areas of leadership, environmental studies, and global issues.  
 

3.0 Courses Not Eligible for Board/Authority Authorization

3.1 Courses with a significant overlap with current provincial curriculum

3.2 Modified courses

3.3 Remedial courses

3.4 Adapted courses

3.5 GED testing preparation courses
 

4.0 Criteria

4.1 The Ministry of Education requirements are listed in the document “Board/Authority Authorized Courses: Required Components” and include a Ministry-developed BAA Course Framework Template.

4.2 The requirements for BAA courses define the structure, components, and rigour of a course.  They consist of the following:

  • Course name
  • Grade level
  • Number of credits (maximum of 4)
  • Course synopsis
  • Rationale
  • Organizational structure appropriate to subject/topic
  • Learning outcomes that are assessable and observable and that can be understood by students and parents
  • Instructional component that clarifies the outcomes and provides a range of pedagogical opportunities
  • Assessment component that provides a range of both formative and summative assessment
  • Learning resources that support the learning outcomes
     

5.0 Approval Process

5.1 The Board requires that any presentation in support of a locally developed course be made through the Superintendent and that it include all requirements as outlined by the Ministry of Education “Board/Authority Authorized Courses Requirements and Procedures Guidebook” (Updated 2011 version).

5.2 Teacher(s) (either individually or in groups) who wish approval of a course of their own design shall use the following procedures:

   5.2.1 Discuss the concept of the proposed course with their school principal before proceeding with the application.

   5.2.2 Make a thorough assessment of the student needs the course would meet.  Consult counsellors and other subject teachers to determine the level of interest and need in the proposed course.  In specific and appropriate situations, it may be advisable to seek expertise from the general community (i.e. specialty courses).

   5.2.3 The course should be consistent with Provincial requirements and based upon current information on how students learn.

   5.2.4 Prepare and submit an overall outline of the proposed course using the BAA Course Application to the School Principal. 

   5.2.5 Include an itemized list of required equipment and facilities, together with a cost analysis and a description of any organizational changes.

5.3 The School Principal will review the proposed course, and will review proposed revisions with the teacher(s).

5.4 The Principal will submit copies of the proposed course to the Superintendent or designate.

5.5 If approved, the Superintendent or designate along with the School Principal and Teacher(s) will present the course to the Board for approval.  In order for the course to be offered in the following school year, Board approval must be obtained prior to April 1st.

5.6 If approved by the Board of Education, the course will be submitted to the Ministry of Education in order to verify that the new course is compliant with the requirements of Board Authorized Course Ministerial Order.

5.7 It is the responsibility of the School Principal to ensure that any instructional material for use with individual students is consistent with and supportive of the objective of locally and provincially approved curricula.

5.8 Each BAA course will be evaluated after its first year and every three years thereafter.  A brief written report is to be submitted to the Superintendent or designate.

 

References:

School Act Section 85 (2) (i), 168 (2) (b)

Ministry Policy (Board/Authority Authorized Courses, January 2004 and Updated 2011)

BAA Course Form: www.bced.gov.bc.ca/graduation/board authority courses.htm

Ministry Developed Courses: www.bced.gov.bc.ca/irp/welcome.php.

Environmental Sustainability Courses: www.bced.gov.bc.ca/greenschools/sustcoursecontent.htm
 

Related Policies and Regulations:

Regulation 1115 – Board Authorized Courses Policy


1115-10A | Questionnaire - Form Approval of Locally Adapted or Locally Developed Course

Reference Title View

Questionnaire - Form

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1120 | French Immersion Policy

RATIONALE/PURPOSE
French Immersion programming provides the opportunity for non-francophone students in the school district to become bilingual in both of Canada's official languages, English and French.

POLICY
The Board of Education believes that students should have the opportunity to receive instruction in the French language through French Immersion programs in elementary, middle, and secondary grades. The French Immersion program operates as an optional district operated and managed program. The French Immersion Program is not intended to be a selective program. It is in students' best interests that classes include students with a variety of aptitudes, cultures, and backgrounds. The Board believes that French Immersion instruction should be available to all students who desire to be enrolled in the program providing staffing requirements can be accommodated.

REFERENCES
School Act, section 5(3)
Ministry of Education Policy: French Immersion Program
Ministerial Order 333/99, Educational Program Guide Order
Ministerial Order 295/95, Required Areas of Study in an Educational Program
Ministerial Order 302/04, Graduation Program Order 


1120-10 | French Immersion Regulation

The Board of Education believes that, in addition to provincially prescribed French courses, students in this school district should have the opportunities of receiving instruction in French language, one of Canada's official
languages, by providing French Immersion at the elementary and secondary levels. The Board of Education does recognize that French Immersion operates as an optional District managed program.

Prince Rupert School District No. 52 will:

  1. Endeavour to maintain an Early French Immersion Program for students in Kindergarten through Intermediate within guidelines of the Ministry of Education, provided that there is adequate student enrollment in the program and that staffing requirements can be accommodated.
  2. Attempt to maintain a dual track, French/English system of school organization that emphasizes multiculturalism and coexistence.
  3. Attempt to provide the elementary Immersion schooling (Kindergarten to grade 7) in the same facility.
  4. Provide French Immersion programming in secondary school subjects within guidelines recommended by the Ministry of Education, as facilities, financial resources, staff resources and school organization permit and provided that there is adequate student enrollment in the program.

ENTRY
The French Immersion Program is not intended to be a selective program and it is in the students' best interest that classes contain students with a variety of aptitudes, cultures and backgrounds. French Immersion instruction should be available to all students who desire to be enrolled in the program unless unavailability of appropriate staff would result in a detrimental learning environment. Therefore:

  1. Any student may enrol in the Early French Immersion Program, if the entry point is appropriate.
  2. Kindergarten shall be the normal entry point for students without previous French instruction.
  3. Entry into Early French Immersion at a higher level for a student without previous French instruction shall be determined by the District Principal after consultation with and following a probationary agreement with the Early French Immersion teacher and the Administrative Officer of Early French Immersion.
  4. If enrolment in Kindergarten is such that the learning environment will deteriorate because an additional Kindergarten class would be required and cannot be offered due to unavailability of Immersion staff, then enrollment should be limited to numbers that would permit an acceptable educational environment and students should be admitted in the following priority.

    a)   Students who reside within School District No. 52 and have a sibling or siblings in the Early French Immersion Program.

    b)   Students who reside within School District No. 52 and have a sibling or siblings attending the school in which the Early French Immersion Program is located.

    c)   Students who reside within School District No. 52 but do not have a sibling in the Early French Immersion Program or in the school in which the program is located. The Superintendent, or designate will adjudicate whenever the above criteria fails to produce a decision.

  5.  ​​Students transferring into School District No. 52 who are already enrolled in French Immersion Program elsewhere will be placed in the program subject to space and resources being available. Transfers out of the program will be made by the District Principal in consultation with parents, Administrative Officer, teacher and counsellor agreeing that the transfer will solve a specific problem for that student.
  6. French Immersion students/programs will not displace students out of their neighbourhood school.


TRANSPORTATION
Transportation to and from the French Immersion school is the responsibility of the parent.

SUPPORT SERVICES
Support services such as Learning Assistance, Library and Gifted will be available to French Immersion students on the basis of equality with regular program students and where possible, available in French and English.
 


1130 | Student Support Policy

RATIONALE

The Board of Education is committed to providing all students with an education program that best suits their needs and enables them to achieve their maximum potential in a safe, caring and welcoming environment. The Board supports an inclusive education system in which all students are fully participating members in a community of learners.

POLICY

The Board believes that the unique needs of individuals and the challenges of a small, remote school district should be taken into account when providing support services to students. The Board supports engaging, inclusive and culturally relevant education for all students within the Response to Instruction and the Universal Instructional Design Frameworks. Where additional services and support for students are needed, decisions are made in consultation with parents, students (when appropriate) and members of the community based team.

Culturally relevant programs and services provide the foundation for healthy students and communities. The Response to Instruction Framework incorporates a flexible continuum of school-wide strategies for all students, targeted supports for students with specific challenges, and intensive supports for students with persistent challenges.

The Universal Instructional Design Framework brings together many school district initiatives to provide multiple avenues of access to curriculum, instruction, and assessment. Services and support focus on multiple pathways to success and multiple ways of defining success.

Within the Response to Instruction and Universal Instructional Design Frameworks students receive maximum benefit from their education program, in accordance with the objectives of Provincial curricula, school district programs, and Board approved school programs.

 

References:

  • Ministry of Education Policy: Special Education
  • Ministry of Education Policy: K-12 Funding, Special Needs
  • Ministry Policy: Distributed Learning: Requirements and Guidelines for Students with Special Needs
  • School Act, Sections 75, 79(3), 85(2)(j), 88(1), 168(2)(t)
  • Ministerial Order M150/89, Amended M297/95; M32/04; M235/07: Special Needs Students Order
  • Ministerial Order 149/89: Support Services for Schools Order
  • Ministerial Order 191/94, amended most recently M197/11: Student Progress Report Order
  • Ministerial Order M638/95, amended most recently by M261: Individual Education Plan Order
  • Prince Rupert School District Response to Instruction (RTI) Framework
  • Universal Instructional Design Framework
  • 1130-10 – Delivery of Instructional Services to Students with Special Needs Regulation

1130-10 | Instructional Services to Students with Special Needs

The Board of School Trustees recognizes and accepts its obligation to provide an appropriate educational program to all children of school age.  In addition, the Board seeks to ensure that all students receive maximum benefit from their instructional program in that, as far as possible, the objectives of the provincial curriculum, district curriculum, and locally approved school programs, are achieved.

Where special services are required by students, decisions must be made as to means of delivering instruction.  Generally it is expected that the instructional program will be carried out in a regular instructional setting.  However, it is recognized that there may be times during the instructional day when a student will require a different instructional environment.

This instructional environment might include using such instructional arrangements as: grouping within the class or school, providing support from special education teachers, (e.g., learning support teachers), providing auxiliary services such as hospital homebound tuition, or enrolling the student in another district where an appropriate program is available.  Close consultation with all parents/guardians is deemed by the Board to be necessary, and particularly where special measures are required to provide an adequate education for the child.  (See Ministry of Education Order 150/89; amended by M397/95)

The factors affecting decisions regarding the delivery of educational services to students with special needs include:

  1. Needs of students.
  2. The means by which instruction can most effectively be provided.
  3. The availability of qualified teaching staff, appropriate facilities and materials, and suitable curriculum.
  4. The wishes of parents/guardians and students.
  5. The level of support available from other agencies such as Ministry of Children and Family Development, Health and the Attorney General's Department.

The Board's primary obligation is to provide an appropriate instructional program and, in attempting to do so, it will actively seek the cooperation and support of other agencies and groups who are able to provide non-educational services to students with special needs.
 

STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES HANDBOOK

Prince Rupert School District No. 52 shall maintain a Learning Services Handbook on the district website.  The Handbook will outline referral procedures, placement process, assessment practices, screening committees, program descriptions and student records, consistent with the Special Education Services:  A Manual of Policies, Procedures and Guidelines.


1130-20 | Guidelines to Third Party Service for Students at Schools

  1. All third party service to students at schools requires the approval of the District Principal, Learning Services (DPLS) or the Superintendent of Schools.  Access will be provided via the building Principal, the District Principal of Learning Services (DPLS), or the Superintendent of Schools.
  2. A meeting with the Superintendent and/or District Principal of Learning Services will be held prior to engaging with students or staff to:
    • Determine the role and qualifications of any third party not directly employed by SD52 who provides service or consultation to students and families. 
    • Ensure there will be no duplication of services currently provided by:
      • IUOE
      • PRDTU
      • Other staff
      • Other established local or Provincial consultants
    • Ensure a protocol exists and is followed for:
      • Involvement in the School Based Team
        • The Learning Services Teacher (LST) is the case manager for students with exceptionalities.  The LST organizes SBT Meetings, takes minutes, invites attendees, etc.  Communication with the Learning Services Teacher is imperative.
  3. We recognize there may be secondary or incidental usefulness of information sharing which may be done only where permissions have been granted by parents/guardian.
  4. Third parties provide support to families not the school system – unless incidentally.
  5. A current criminal record check is required as per any volunteer.
  6. Regarding observations in schools:
    • Prior to observations or visits at the school:  
      • Any observations must be approved by the school principal and/or the DPLS
      • Any observations must be coordinated with the classroom teacher, LST, school principal, or the DPLS
    • Following observations or visits at the school:   
      • Any reports prepared must be shared with the LST, school principal or the DPLS
      • Reports must follow ethical and confidentiality guidelines
      • Third party agencies may not make recommendations to Education Assistants or Classroom Teachers; any proposed recommendations must be discussed with the LST, DPLS, or school principal, and the LST, DPLS and/or  school principal will determine whether or not to implement those recommendations
    • The third party provider must:
      • Sign in and out at the office as per district practice
      • Request permission to attend the school in advance and recognize that there may be times which are not convenient based on classroom or other school activities
      • Provide parent permissions for working with the child to the school principal
      • Recognize our primary responsibility is to the student and their family
      • Leave the site if asked
  7. Third parties are to familiarize themselves with and abide by school district policies (which can be found on the SD52 website) and regulations regarding (these can be found on the SD#52 website:
    • Restraint and safety
    • Emergency procedures (fire drill, earthquake, lockdown, and hold and secure etc.)
  8. Third party agencies must act without conflict of interest.
  9. Insurance shall be held by third parties (coverage for accident and liability, including WorkSafe BC coverage).

 

Related Policies and Regulations:

1130   Student Support Policy


1140-10 | Work Study / Work Experience

  1. The Board authorizes the conduct of Work Study/Work Experience programs for students of 15 years of age or older in accordance with regulations and guidelines of the Ministry of Education and the Ministry of Labour for such programs.
     
  2. The Board also authorizes Work Study programs for students under 15 years of age. Students under 15 years of age participating in a Work Study program are prohibited from participating in "Work" experience.
     
  3. The Superintendent of Schools may apply on behalf of the Board for Ministry of Education approval to conduct Work Experience programs.

1150-10 | Student Retention

Years of cumulative research has consistently demonstrated that the potential for negative effects consistently outweighs the potential for positive outcomes with respect to grade retention. Accordingly, educational practice has shifted to the almost exclusive use of promotion with intervention for those students who are at academic risk.  The new curriculum for Grade K-9, implemented in September 2016 is designed to support the inclusive classroom and the ideal of continuous learning.

In the Prince Rupert School District, promotion practices are expected to be in alignment with research findings: i.e. students will not normally “repeat” a program of studies in the primary or intermediate grades or otherwise be retained in a grade to join a younger age group.  Each school is expected to develop appropriate intervention strategies in support of this practice.

In highly unusual circumstances, exceptions may be made. In these exceptional instances, it is imperative that the decision to retain be made by the school-based team in consultation with district and/or Board Office staff. Prior to holding a school-based meeting or entering into any discussion with parents regarding retention, principals are expected to provide the Superintendent of Schools (or designate) with appropriate documentation regarding any student who is being considered for retention.

Any such decision requires informed and signed parental consent indicating that the parents are aware of current research on student retention.  Principals may share “Reporting Student Progress: Policy and Practice,” March 2009, p. 41 for a brief examination of concerns about retention.

Such a record of parental consent would clearly document why retention would be in the best, long-term interest of the child.


1160-10 | Home Schooling

The Board respects the right of parents to have the student home schooled as outlined in Section 13 of the School Act.  It also assumes that when the parent makes the decision to home school that they assume full responsibility for the student's educational program.  The Board supports the provision of resources. The Board does not support access to public school activities or classes unless required by the School Act.  The Board, however, reserves the right to approve student involvement in activities or classes at their neighbourhood school based on the merits of the individual situation.  The Board approves access of home school students to neighbourhood school library resources normally available to that school's students.

As directed by School Act, Regulation 3.5, home schooled students do not have access to school activities or classes.  Such activities and classes would be all regular classes, band assemblies, public performers in schools, specialized courses, special education resources, district specialists, etc.  The Administrative Officer may authorize spectator involvement of home schooled students in occasional school activities.

No teacher will be required to tutor, assist, advise or prepare materials for home school students.

Home school students and/or parents do not have access to school office, district office or Resource Centre duplicating and other related materials.

Home school students may have access to their neighbourhood school library.  The Administrative Officer may set limitations to usage so as to protect the resources for regular students.  The school's Administrative Officer(s) have authority to set rules and expectations for home school students entering the school and using library resources.


1160-20 | Challenge

A.   Preamble

Challenge is a tool that can assess students' prior learning and can allow them to obtain credit for a grade 11 or grade 12 course.

Challenge is a rigorous process for students who provide compelling evidence of being exceptional in a subject area and who have a high likelihood of successfully meeting the learning outcomes of a course.

It is anticipated that challenge will apply to only a small number of students.

Challenge is not envisioned as a way for students to improve their course marks, nor as a replacement for the valuable experience students gain by being in a classroom setting.
 

B.   Regulation

  1. All students may challenge courses for credit, subject to procedures established by the School Board.
  2. Students may challenge for credit only grade 11 and 12 provincial or locally developed courses.
  3. For a challenge to be successful, students must demonstrate they have met the prescribed learning outcomes of a course.
  4. To successfully challenge for credit, students must meet the same standards as students who take the course through regular classes.
  5. Students will be awarded a letter grade and percentage mark for a course which has been successfully challenged.
  6. There is no limit to the number of grade 11 and 12 courses that a student can challenge.
  7. Courses based on provincial curricula will be available for challenge one year after full implementation of their related Integrated Resource Packages (IRP's).  Challenge for locally developed courses will follow the same timeline as provincial curricula.
  8. A fee of $100.00 is charged in order to cover the additional expenses associated with preparing, conducting, evaluating and recording challenge exams.  This fee will be collected by the school in advance of the challenge examination.  Evidence of payment is required in order for a student to participate in the process.
  9. A challenge should begin no later than one quarter (10 weeks) prior to the commencement of the course being challenged.
     

C.   Guidelines

General

The intent is that an entire course may be challenged.

Students will be granted only one opportunity to challenge a specific course.

The Principal will be responsible for implementation of the procedures.
 

Student Eligibility

In order to be eligible to participate in the challenge process, a student must be enrolled in the School District.

Only students who have not completed the course through previous enrolment will be eligible to challenge it for credit.

Students arriving from other jurisdictions may challenge for credit where equivalency cannot be determined.

Students must be able to demonstrate their readiness to challenge a specific course for credit.  Indications of readiness will include:

  • strong and compelling evidence related to the course that suggests students will achieve the prescribed learning outcomes for the course;
  • recommendations from teachers based on previous learning in a related area; for example, a recommendation may be from a teacher of the course being challenged or a teacher who has previously taught the student;
  • evidence that relevant learning has been acquired outside of school; and
  • appropriateness of challenge to the student's education goals as set out in their Student Learning Plan.

The decision for readiness should be made by the school in consultation with the student and parents.
 

Courses Eligible to be Challenged

Students who qualify to participate in the challenge process may challenge for credit only grade 11 or 12 courses.  However, students may challenge a grade 11 or 12 course without being enrolled in grade 11 or 12.

The School Board will provide the opportunity for challenge in all provincial courses and those locally developed courses approved by the School Board, except as noted below:

The Board is not obliged to provide challenge for provincial courses which are not taught in the district;

The Board is not obliged to provide challenge for locally developed courses not currently being taught in the district;

The Board will arrange inter-school or challenge opportunities.  This will allow students to challenge courses not offered in their school but offered in the district.
 

Assessing and Evaluating the Challenge

The strategies involved in a challenge should reflect the range and depth of the prescribed learning outcomes for the course and could include:

  1.  laboratory demonstrations
  2.  oral/aural performances
  3. portfolios or collections of work
  4. interviews
  5. term and final school-based examinations
  6. distance education materials
  7. shop skills demonstrations
  8. reports, essays or other written forms of expression
  9. translations
  10. documentation of specific learning outcomes having been met
  11. knowledge of or demonstration of safety consciousness
  12. other assessment strategies

The assessment and evaluation strategies should include more than a single activity and should involve a process over time.

Each department as required will develop a Challenge Framework for assessing and evaluating a student's ability to meet the prescribed learning outcomes.

The assessment and evaluation strategy should be established jointly by administrator, department head or designate, counsellor, challenge student and their parents.  The final decision shall rest with the Principal.

The assessment and evaluation strategy must be completed at least four weeks prior to the start of the quarter exam schedule.

If challenge is unsuccessful, students have the option of pursuing course credit through enrolling in the course.
 

Challenging Courses with Provincial Examinations

Students may challenge courses with a provincial examination according to the following procedures:

  • Students will first challenge the school portion of the course mark.
  • If the students are unsuccessful, they will be given an opportunity to write the provincial examination.
  • The school will submit the school mark derived from the challenge process before the provincial examination is written, as indicated in the Ministry's Handbook of Procedures.
  • Students will only write the provincial examination at the scheduled times set by the Ministry.
  • Students will be awarded credit and receive a letter grade and percentage mark according to Ministry Reporting Regulation and Guidelines and the Student Progress Report Order.

1160-30 | Equivalency for Credit Grade 11 and 12

A.    Definition
Equivalency is the process of granting credit for a Grade 11 or 12 provincial or locally developed course offered in Prince Rupert School District No. 52, if supporting documentation shows that a student has achieved the course learning outcomes at another institution or in another educational jurisdiction.

B.    Regulation

  1. All students enrolled at a secondary school in School District No. 52, including home schooled students, are entitled to apply for an equivalency review of their credentials received from other educational jurisdictions and institutions outside the regular school system.
  2. Equivalency credit will be available only for Grade 11 and 12 courses.
  3. To qualify for an equivalency review, students must provide documentation to prove they have successfully completed a course or program of learning.
  4. Full equivalency credit will only be granted for credentials from other educational jurisdictions and institutions outside the regular school system which match at least 80% of the prescribed learning outcomes for provincial and locally developed courses.  
  5. Partial equivalency may be granted for credentials which meet less than 80% of the prescribed learning outcomes of a provincial or locally developed course.
  6. There is no limit to the number of credits a students may be awarded through the equivalency process.
  7. All course credits which are received through equivalency must be assigned either "Transfer Standing", or a letter grade and percentage, for transcript and reporting purposes.
  8. The school administrative officer will be responsible for implementing procedures for determining equivalency.
  9. School District No. 52 will follow the Table of Equivalencies issued by the Ministry of Education, which assesses credentials from other institutions outside the regular school system for equivalent course credit.
  10. If a student requests an Equivalency Review for a provincial course with credentials not listed in the Table of Equivalencies, the student must follow Prince Rupert School District No. 52 procedures for establishing equivalency.
  11. If an Equivalency Review is required there is a $100.00 fee to cover additional expenses.

C.    Procedures for Establishing Equivalency

  1. In order to be eligible for an Equivalency Review students must provide a credential, document, diploma or certificate stating what course was completed and giving an evaluation of the student's performance, translated into English if necessary. 

    i)  Selection and Challenge of Learning Resources (B.C. Ministry of Education, 1991).

    ii) Secondary Education in Canada: A Student Transfer Guide (Council of Ministers of Education of Canada, 1991).

    iii) The International Guide to Qualifications in Education (The National Academic Recognition Information Centre for the United Kingdom, Mansell Publishing Ltd.).

  2. After the student's credential is verified, provincial equivalency will be granted and credit value will be assigned in accordance with:
  3. The school counsellor, in consultation with appropriate school personnel, is responsible for assigning a letter grade and percentage, or a transfer standing to the learning.
  4. If the credential is not listed in the list of resources under C.2 then the following procedure will be followed:

    a)   The student will fill in an "Application for Equivalency" form.

    b)   A fee of $100.00 is to be paid to the school.

    c)   The student will provide a copy of the course syllabus describing learning outcomes, translated into English if necessary.

    d)   The school counsellor, in consultation with appropriate school personnel, will decide whether or not there is a match of learning outcomes between the syllabus and the course for which full or partial equivalency is being sought.

    e)   The school administrative officer will contact the District Principal of Secondary Education who will convene a District Review Panel consisting of at least one administrator, one counsellor and one subject specialist to determine the credibility of the institution and the qualifications of the instructor and to evaluate the criteria used to assess and evaluate student performance.  Consultation with community resource people may need to occur.

    f)   The District Review Panel will recommend to the Superintendent of Schools whether or not equivalency should be granted and what credit value should be assigned.

    g)   Once equivalency is granted, this information should be communicated to schools under the title "School District 52's Table of Equivalencies".

    h)   The school counsellor, in consultation with appropriate school personnel, is responsible for assigning a letter grade and a percentage, or a transfer standing, to the learning.

  5.  Schools are responsible for establishing reasonable timelines for students to apply for equivalency.
  6. Schools are responsible for ensuring this Regulation and procedures are communicated to students and parents.
  7. If equivalency is not granted, students can apply to challenge the course.

1160-40 | Independent Directed Study

A.   Purpose

The purpose of independent-directed study is to permit students to initiate their own course of learning at the grade 11 or 12 level under the supervision of a teacher.  Such study is intended to provide opportunity for in-depth study and will be based on either provincial curriculum or locally developed curriculum.

B.   Preamble

Independent-directed study provides opportunities for greater flexibility in the education system.  It does this by permitting students to pursue learning outcomes beyond those usually taught in the school course.  This could take the form of extending the curriculum at a higher level, addressing parts of the curriculum that have not been taught, conducting an in-depth study of an aspect of the curriculum, or doing more focused activities related to parts of the curriculum.

C.   Regulation

  1. The Independent-Directed Study Regulation is not a student entitlement.
  2. Independent-directed study must be based on either the learning outcomes of a provincial curriculum or the learning outcomes of a locally developed curriculum.
  3. The maximum value in one subject for independent-directed study is two credits.
  4. Credit earned through independent-directed study will be applied only to the Selected Studies component of the provincial graduation requirements.
  5. Within the selected studies there is a 12 credit and a 10 credit section.  Students are permitted to apply 10 independent-directed study credits to the 10 credit section and 12 or more credits to the 12 credit section.  Secondary counsellors, therefore, will determine the best placement for the independent-directed study credits within the selected studies components.

D.   Guidelines

General

School Boards should develop procedures to allow students to pursue independent-directed study.  Principals will be delegated responsibility to implement the procedures and approve all independent studies.  Teachers will decide whether they wish to arrange independent-directed study with a student.

Student Participation

In order to participate in independent-directed study, students will demonstrate an ability to work independently with minimal direction.

Students will not be required to be enrolled in, or have completed, the specific course in order to be considered for the opportunity to participate in an independent-directed study related to the course.

Requests and approval to participate in an independent-directed study will be linked to the student's goals as articulated in the Student Learning Plan.  Students will be advised how independent-directed study will fit into their course of studies and graduation requirements.
 

Designing an Independent-Directed Study

An independent-directed study must be principally based on the learning outcomes from one curriculum, either provincially approved or locally developed.

An independent-directed study must be assigned a value of one or two credits.

Students will be involved in the design, planning and evaluation of their work.  With the support of an educator each student will develop a plan for completing the independent-directed study.  This will become part of the Student Learning Plan and include:

  • a process for ongoing facilitation and assessment of student progress;
  • a criteria for determining successful completion of the independent-directed study; and
  • an agreed upon credit value for the proposed independent-directed study.
     

Assigning and Reporting Independent-Directed Study

When a student has completed an independent-directed study, the results will be reported in the subsequent reporting period using a letter grade and a percentage and will show the associated credit(s).

The independent-directed study code will indicate the course on which it is based.

Students will receive provincial course credit when the independent-directed study is based on provincial curriculum; students will receive local course credit when the independent-directed study is based on locally developed curriculum.

An independent-directed study based on curriculum at the grade 11 level will be recorded as grade 11 credit; such study at the grade 12 level will be recorded as a grade 12 credit.


1170-10 | Copyright

The Board of School Trustees recognizes the existence of the Copyright Act (1988) designed to protect the rights of authors and producers of creative works. 

The Board requires its employees to respect copyright provisions as they pertain to all aspects of modern publishing, media and computer technology and the Board will not accept financial responsibility for any violations that are knowingly undertaken by its employees. 

Employees of School District No. 52 need to be instructed so that they do not violate the Copyright Act (1988) when performing their duties. Accordingly, Administrative Officers and supervisors should ensure their staff is familiar with the Regulations and guidelines. 

The Board requires teachers, when there are opportunities for copyright violations by students, to instruct students what the Copyright Act means and to attempt to supervise students in a manner that a copyright violation does not occur. 

The Superintendent shall create guidelines to instruct employees on what is or is not a violation of the Copyright Act. 

Copies of the guidelines shall be readily available to all employees. 

Applicable portions of the Copyright Act and guidelines will be attached to V.C.R.'s, computers, photocopiers and other appropriate duplicating equipment. 
 

COPYRIGHT GUIDELINES 

A. Computer Software 

  1. Unauthorized duplication of computer software is illegal and constitutes infringement of copyright according to both judicial precedent and the Copyright Act. 
  2. It is not legal for a teacher to make class sets of software without first obtaining authorization (e.g., site licences) from the copyright owner. 
  3. Owners of computer software may make one back-up copy and/or modify legally obtained computer software for their personal use. 
  4. Administrators are advised to investigate the overall computer software situation at their schools and formulate policies for dealing with unlawful software duplication. For example, if classroom sets of pirated software are currently in use, steps should be taken to destroy such copies, and to obtain the software legally. Teachers and students should also be advised that pirated software is illegal and subject to penalty. 

B. Audio Visual Materials 

  1. It is illegal to tape TV programs "off air" on a VCR, for classroom use without an appropriate licence. 
  2. Transferring 16 mm film to video for classroom use constitutes an infringement of copyright without the appropriate licence. (The appropriate licence will be provincially negotiated permission or individually acquired permission - i.e., individual has legal permission.) 
  3. Classroom screenings of video cassettes rented or purchased from video outlets "for home use only" constitutes a "public performance" and therefore are in violation of copyright. 
  4. School Administrators are requested to circulate school regulations regarding audio visual taping restrictions, as well as providing teachers with information regarding materials that are licensed for school use (e.g., materials found in the Learning Resources Branch repertoire have been licensed for school use). 

C. Public Performance 

  1. The right to perform is among the rights conferred to owners of copyright works by the Copyright Act. A performance is considered to be of a "public" nature simply if it can be "heard" by members of the public. School performances of both dramatic and musical works are protected by copyright. 
  2. A dramatic work is only infringed if an unauthorized "material and substantial" portion of the production is performed in public. The unauthorized reading or recitation in public by one person of any reasonable extract from any "published work" is not prohibited by the Act. 
  3. Copyright of a dramatic work will be infringed if there is an unauthorized reproduction of a substantial portion of the work, incidents or characters in "the same order and arrangement" as provided for in the original production. 
  4. A copyright infringement is avoided where the person permitting an unauthorized performance subject to copyright was not aware and had no reasonable grounds for suspecting that the performance would be an infringement of copyright. This fair dealing defence could be employed, for example, in the case of a teacher who, in good faith, was not aware of the copyright laws governing a public performance and staged dramatic work without the permission of a copyright holder. 
  5. The unauthorized reproduction (i.e., photocopy) or distribution of multiple copies of a substantial portion of a dramatic work constitutes copyright infringement. 
  6. Copyright of a musical work is infringed in most circumstances by staging a public performance of a substantial part of the work, without authorization. Schools are exempted from the general copyright rules as a result of Section 17(3) of the Copyright Act which states that no school shall be held liable to pay any compensation to the owner of any musical work or to any person claiming through him by reason of the public performance of any musical work in furtherance of an educational purpose. 
  7. The term "musical" is not defined by the Copyright Act. Schools should therefore verify that the work to be performed is in fact a "musical", before a public performance is staged. 
  8. Photocopying and distributing a substantial portion of a musical work to students for a public performance, without authorization constitutes copyright infringement. 

D. Photocopying/Blackboard Copying 

  1. Students, teachers, administrators, etc. are legally entitled to make photocopies of an insubstantial portion of copyrighted materials for purposes of personal research, study, review or criticism. 
  2. Teachers are not prohibited from reciting, reading, or copying onto the classroom board or overhead projector a brief or "insubstantial" passage of a copyrighted work without authorization. Common sense should be exercised in determining what constitutes a "substantial" portion of a work being copied. 
  3. Students are not prohibited from copying an unauthorized brief or "insubstantial" passage of a copyrighted work for a school purpose (e.g., a school assignment). 
  4. Reproducing and distributing multiple photocopies of an unauthorized, insubstantial passage of a copyrighted work for a school purpose (e.g., an examination), is not expressly prohibited. Educators should bear in mind that the use of unauthorized, insubstantial portions of copyrighted materials is limited to very brief passages. The unauthorized use of copyrighted material as a means to avoid the purchase of such materials, however, clearly constitutes copyright infringement not falling within the fair dealing defence. 
  5. If multiple copies of a substantial portion of a copyrighted work are necessary for classroom use, permission should be requested from the copyright holder (usually the publisher listed in the front of the book or article). Such requests will generally be met with a positive reply, and may require payment of a copyright fee (which varies depending upon the work in question). 
  6. Plays, music, choreographic works, art work, etc. are subject to the same copyright rules and prohibitions as other materials. 
  7. Original copies of maps and charts can be displayed without infringing copyright. 
  8. Short passages from copyrighted works, not themselves published for the use of schools, may be published in a collection of materials intended for a school purpose. Both the title of the collection and any advertisements issued by the publisher must indicate the educational purpose for which the materials are intended. Not more than two such passages from works by the same author may be published by the same publisher without authorization within a five year period. The sources of such passages must also be acknowledged. 

Note: If in doubt as to whether a passage is substantial or insubstantial, then do not copy. 

These statements will appear on all V.C.R.'s: 

School District No. 52 Regulation prohibits Copyright Law infringement. It is illegal to tape TV programs "off air" on a VCR, for classroom use without an appropriate licence. 

Classroom screenings of video cassettes rented or purchased from video outlets "for home use only" constitutes a "public performance" and therefore are in violation of copyright. 

These statements will appear on all photocopiers: 

School District No. 52 Regulation prohibits Copyright Law infringement. Students, teachers, administrators, etc. are legally entitled to make photocopies of an insubstantial portion of copyrighted materials for purposes of personal research, study, review or criticism. 

Reproducing and distributing photocopies of an unauthorized, insubstantial passage of a copyrighted work for a school purpose (e.g., an examination or a school assignment), is not expressly prohibited. Educators should bear in mind that the use of unauthorized, insubstantial portions of copyrighted materials is limited to very brief passages. The unauthorized use of copyrighted material as a means to avoid the purchase of such materials, however, clearly constitutes copyright infringement not falling within the fair dealing defence. 


1210 | Student Registration and Catchment Area (Elementary) Policy

RATIONALE

The Board of Education recognizes that there is an obligation to provide educational programs and services for eligible students who live within the geographical boundaries of the school district. 

It is in the best interest of students that enrolment in schools and assignment to programs occur in a systematic, equitable and educationally beneficial fashion.  There must be a balance between school attendance based on designated catchment areas and attendance at a school, for good reasons, as a non-catchment child.

POLICY

School district students are generally expected to attend their neighbourhood school according to catchment areas defined by the Board of Education. 

Space permitting, students may attend a school outside their catchment area.

As outlined in the School Act, Sections 74.1, 75 and 75.1, students will be enrolled in schools and assigned to programs with respect to age, school catchment area, residence location, statutory entitlement, and the availability of space, facilities and instructional resources.  The catchment areas are defined by the Board and may be amended as provided by Section 75.1 (2) of the School Act. 

Parents or guardians may request a cross-boundary transfer for their elementary student or students to attend another school in accordance with district regulations. 

 

Related Policies and Regulations:

1210-10 Student Registration and Catchment Area (Elementary)


1210-10 | Student Registration and Catchment Area (Elementary) Regulation

Reference Title View

Student Registration and Catchment Area (Elementary)

view »

1210-10A | Application for Elementary Cross Boundary

Reference Title View

Application for Elementary Cross Boundary

view »

1220 | International Students Policy

RATIONALE/PURPOSE

In recent years, many students from other countries have come to British Columbia for schooling because their families value the high quality of education provided by our school system.  Some International students enroll in Canadian schools to upgrade their language ability in one or both of Canada's official languages.  Some students enroll to benefit from the cross-cultural experience of living and attending school in a country other than their own.  Others come in order to graduate from secondary schools and earn a Dogwood Diploma.

Ministry of Education policy provides guidelines for international students who intend to graduate from a public or independent school in British Columbia with a Dogwood Certificate.

 

POLICY

The Board supports enrollment of international students and strives to meet their educational needs while ensuring that those who intend to graduate meet all of the requirements of the Ministry of Education legislation and policy.

International students who intend to graduate must meet all graduation requirements in ways that ensure competence in either French or English.  In accordance with Ministry policy, international students may be restricted in the number and type of courses given credit through equivalency, external credits, or challenge.

Enrollment of international and non-reciprocal exchange students is subject to space being available and to tuition being paid to cover costs of their educational program.

Reciprocal exchange students is subject to space being available and a local student attending in their stead overseas.

 

REFERENCES

Ministry of Education Policy, International Student Graduation Credit
Ministerial Order 302/04, the Graduation Program Order

Related Policies and Regulations:
1220-10 - - International and Non-Reciprocal Exchange Students - Admission and Tuition 


1220-10 | International and Non-Reciprocal Exchange Students – Admission and Tuition

The Ministry of Education defines “International Students” in the International Student Graduation Credit Policy 2009 as follows:

Students who have moved from outside of Canada to British Columbia and do not meet the residency requirements of Section 82 of the School Act.

For the purposes of the International Student Graduation Credit Policy 2009, an international student is a student from outside of Canada who is in British Columbia for the purpose of obtaining an educational program, is not ordinarily resident in British Columbia nor eligible for provincial or federal funding.

Note that students who are eligible for provincial funding under the exceptions listed in the Eligibility of Students for Operating Grant Funding do not need to meet the requirements of the International Student Graduation Credit Policy 2009.

For the purpose of this regulation, a “Non-Reciprocal Exchange Student” is:

  • a student from outside of Canada;
  • who is in British Columbia for the purpose of attending school but not to obtain credit towards graduation; and
  • for whom there is no exchange with a local student attending in their stead overseas.

International and Non-Reciprocal Exchange students are not funded by the Ministry of Education and are required to pay tuition fees as set out in this regulation.

  1. Applicants are to make their request in writing to the office of the Superintendent of Schools.
  2. Applications must be approved by the Superintendent of Schools prior to applicants attending school in School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert).
  3. "International" students will be allowed to attend school in School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) subject to space being available and subject to the payment by certified cheque:
    • for attendance for a full year, an amount equal to the School District's average student funding for the previous school year, rounded up to the next $500 increment. Such tuition cheque is to be received by the Secretary-Treasurer by August 15.
    • for attendance for the second semester of secondary school, an amount equal to 65% of the fee set out in (a) above.  Such tuition cheque is to be received by the Secretary-Treasurer by January 15.
  4. "Non-Reciprocal Exchange" students will be allowed to attend school in School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) subject to space being available and subject to the payment by certified cheque of $7,000 for the 2016-17 school year. Such tuition cheque is to be received by the Secretary-Treasurer by August 15.
  5. International and Non-Reciprocal Exchange students will also be expected to pay the normal course and school charges.  (See Regulation 1710-10)
  6. The Superintendent of Schools will assess the International or Non-Reciprocal Exchange student's competency in English. If English as a Second Language (E.S.L). help is deemed necessary the tuition fees shall be increased by an amount necessary to pay for the E.S.L. instruction.
  7. If an International or Non-Reciprocal Exchange Student has special needs which require additional services, the tuition fees for will be increased by an amount necessary to pay for those additional services.

REFERENCE:

1220 International Students Policy

1220-20A  Application for Admission of Non-Canadian Students

1710-10   Student Fees and Deposits


1220-20A | Application for Admission of Non-Canadian Students - Form

Reference Title View

Application for Admission of Non-Canadian Students - Form

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1230-10 | Student Access to their School

All school children should have access to their school upon their arrival at school each morning, as well as at recess and at noon hours when scheduled supervision is available.

  1. Each school Principal shall ensure that school doors are open to all students each school day a full one-half hour prior to school starting time and the Principal will ensure that the students are appropriately supervised during this time.
  2. Students given the privilege of entering the school early will be expected to behave according to school rules and to stay in the areas designated by the Principal.
  3. The privilege of early entry may be denied to students who do not behave appropriately and parents will be so notified.
  4. Students in elementary and middle school are generally expected to be outside before school and during recess and noon hour breaks. However at the Principal’s discretion, during inclement weather, students may be allowed to use a supervised area of the school.

1310 | Child Protection Policy

I   Rationale and Purpose

The purpose of this policy is to support a comprehensive, coordinated and collaborative approach for responding to child abuse and neglect by:

a)   providing child abuse prevention programs to students;

b)   providing school officials, employees and other persons working in schools with training in recognizing signs of child abuse and neglect;

c)   providing school officials, employees and other persons working in schools with direction and training on their legal obligation to report child abuse and neglect to a Child Welfare Worker under the Child, Family and Community Service Act, to the RCMP where the child is in immediate danger, and to school officials;

d)   requiring school officials to investigate and/or report to the RCMP allegations of child abuse involving current and former Board employees, volunteers, or contract service providers;

e)   establishing a child abuse/neglect reporting and investigation protocol with other responsible agencies, to identify the roles and responsibilities of school officials and personnel from other agencies in responding to allegations of child abuse or neglect;

f)    providing assistance to victims of child abuse and neglect by counselling and referrals to other agencies, as appropriate.
 

II Recognizing Child Abuse and Neglect

Child abuse can take physical, sexual, or emotional forms, or may take the form of parental neglect.  The descriptions of physical abuse, emotional abuse, emotional harm, sexual abuse, sexual exploitation, and neglect contained in the BC Handbook for Action on Child Abuse and Neglect for Service Providers (2007) (pages 23-26) (or later editions) should be applied for purposes of this policy.
 

III  Reporting and Investigation

The Board acknowledges that responses to reports of child abuse and neglect may involve Board of Education personnel, child welfare and law enforcement agencies.

The Board supports a coordinated and collaborative response to reports of child abuse and neglect between:

  1. The Board;
  2. Prince Rupert RCMP;
  3. The Ministry of Children and Family Development; and
  4. Delegated Aboriginal Child and Family Services Agencies, for example:
  • Nisga’a Child and Family Services; and
  • Northwest Inter-Nation Family and Child Services.

The Board supports the development of an interagency child abuse/neglect protocol agreement that sets out roles and responsibilities for reporting and investigating child abuse/neglect issues and is consistent with Board procedures for Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect.

All school officials and employees must understand and respect their legal obligation to report child abuse and neglect to a child welfare worker where they have reason to believe that a child is in need of protection within the meaning of the Child, Family and Community Service Act.  They also need to comply with their reporting obligations as identified in Board procedures for Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect.

School officials must also understand their role in coordinating with responsible agencies and in investigating allegations of child abuse against school employees, in accordance with Board procedures for Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect and the interagency child abuse/neglect protocol agreement.
 

IV Respecting the Rights of Accused Individuals

The Board acknowledges that individuals under investigation regarding allegations of child abuse or neglect may have contractual or other legal rights during the investigative process.  Board investigations will be conducted in a manner that is respectful of these rights.
 

V  Training and Educational Programs

The Board requires that school officials, employees, volunteers and contract service providers receive training on how to recognize signs of child abuse or neglect, how to respond to reports of child abuse or neglect, and standards of conduct for employees, volunteers and service providers governing their interactions with students.

The Superintendent or designate will ensure that appropriate opportunities to receive and/or review training are made available, on an annual basis, to school officials, employees, volunteers and contract service providers.

The Superintendent or designate will ensure that child abuse prevention programs are provided to students in accordance with the Ministry of Education’s prescribed learning outcomes.
 

Related Policies and Regulations:

1310-10   Child Protection / Child Neglect and Abuse Regulation

 


1310-10 | Child Protection / Child Neglect and Abuse

Board Procedures for Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect

1.0 Definitions:

    1.1 “Child Welfare Worker” in these procedures refers to a person delegated under the Child, Family and Community Service Act to provide child welfare services, including responses to suspected child abuse and neglect.  The Ministry of Children and Family Development and fully delegated Aboriginal Child and Family Service Agencies employ Child Welfare Workers authorized to respond to suspected child abuse and neglect.

    1.2 “Interagency Child Abuse / Neglect Reporting and Investigation Protocol” refers to the interagency agreement between the Board of Education of School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert), Ministry of Children and Family Development Child Welfare Authority, Nishga’a Child and Family Services, Northwest Inter-Nation Family and Child Services, and the Prince Rupert RCMP, dated October ___, 2011, as amended from time to time, setting out responsibilities of the respective agencies in reporting and responding to situations involving concerns about child abuse or neglect.

    1.3 “Parent” (CFCSA s. 1) includes someone with whom a child resides and who stands in place of a parent (except if placed there by Ministry of Children and Family Development or a delegated Aboriginal Child and Family Services Agency).

    1.4 “Police” refers to the Prince Rupert Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) local detachment.

    1.5 “Superintendent” refers to the Board’s Superintendent of Schools appointed under the School Act and includes any person designated by the Superintendent to fulfill the Superintendent’s responsibilities described herein.

2.0 Where allegations of child abuse or neglect involve the conduct of parents or parental failure to protect a child

    2.1 Reporting to a Child Welfare Worker
The Child, Family and Community Service Act makes it a legal duty (CFCSA s. 14) of every person who has reason to believe that a child “needs protection” as defined in that Act
(CFCSA s. 13) to report the matter to a Child Welfare Worker.
The definition of when a child “needs protection” includes circumstances of physical harm, sexual abuse and exploitation or emotional harm by a child’s parent, or by another person if the parent is unwilling or unable to protect the child.  It also includes circumstances of parental neglect and abandonment.

    2.2 “Reason to believe” means that based on observation or information received, the person believes that a child has been or is likely to be at risk.  Proof is not required.  The child welfare worker may investigate and makes a determination whether abuse or neglect has occurred or is likely to occur. (Further discussion and examples may be found in the BC Handbook for Action on Child Abuse and Neglect for Service Providers.)

A Board employee who has reason to believe that a child "needs protection", must make a report to a Child Welfare Worker.  If the employee has a concern but is not sure whether the concern amounts to a reason to believe that the child needs protection, the employee should consult with school officials and/or a Child Welfare Worker about whether the indicators observed are cause for concern or amount to reason to believe that the child needs protection.  School officials may support employees in consultations or reports but should not hinder any employee from consulting with a Child Welfare Worker about a concern.

    2.3 Reporting to the police
Abused or neglected children may be victims of offences under the Criminal Code of Canada such as physical or sexual assault; sexual exploitation; failure to provide the necessities of life; or criminal negligence causing bodily harm.

Where a child is in imminent danger, school officials should notify the police immediately.

Not every incident that might constitute an offence (e.g., a minor physical assault) warrants police involvement.  Where a report is made to a Child Welfare Worker, normally the Child Welfare Worker will decide whether there is reason to believe that there has been a criminal offence committed that warrants police involvement and, if so, the matter is reported by the Child Welfare Worker to the police in order that they can exercise their law enforcement duties.

If school employees have any question as to whether conduct should be reported to the police, they should consult with school officials and/or a Child Welfare Worker.

    2.4 Reporting to Board Officials
Employees who make reports to a Child Welfare Worker should inform the school principal or the District Principal of Student Support Services.

Where allegations of child abuse are made against Board employees, volunteers, contract service providers, or others in the school setting

Reports of child abuse may involve allegations against Board employees, volunteers, contract service providers, or other persons on school property, school officials have the primary responsibility for dealing with these allegations.  Reports to Child Welfare Workers from school officials are not usually required, unless there is reason to believe that children outside the school setting may need protection or the parents are unable or unwilling to take any action required to protect the child. 

Employees who have reason to believe that another employee, volunteer, contract service provider or other person on school property has abused a student must report the incident or information to the school principal or the Director of Instruction (Human Resources).  Parents of children alleged to have been abused in the school setting must be informed by Board officials of the allegation and the outcome of the Board investigation, unless there are special circumstances relating, for example, to a child protection or police investigation, or endangerment of the child.

    3.1 Board Employees
It is the legal responsibility of school officials and employees to provide a safe learning environment for students.  Where there are allegations of child abuse by a Board employee, the Superintendent is responsible to investigate the allegations and/or report the matter to the police in accordance with the Interagency Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting and Investigation Protocol.  The Board and Superintendent have the authority under the School Act (s. 15) to suspend an employee whose presence threatens the welfare of students.  The Board also has the authority under the School Act to suspend an employee who is charged with a criminal offence.

    3.2 Volunteers
Where there are allegations of child abuse by a volunteer, school officials have the authority to prohibit the volunteer’s attendance at school or an official school function, in accordance with Policy #5310 (Volunteers), the School Act (s. 177(2)), if applicable, and the Interagency Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting and Investigation Protocol.

    3.3 Contracted Service Providers
Where there are allegations of child abuse by contracted service providers, school officials have the authority to prohibit the service provider’s attendance at school or an official school function, in accordance with the Board’s contractual rights, property rights and its authority under the School Act.

    3.4 Other Persons
Where there are allegations of child abuse by other persons, school officials have the authority under the School Act to prohibit the person’s attendance on school premises (S.A. s. 177) and to seek the assistance of the police, in accordance with the Interagency Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting and Investigation Protocol.

    3.5 Reporting to the police
Not every incident that might, if proven to constitute an offence, will warrant police involvement.  School officials are expected to exercise judgment.  Where there is reason to believe that the alleged child abuse by employees, volunteers, contract service providers or other persons may constitute a criminal offence warranting police involvement, school officials should consult with the police regarding the matter.  Where the police initiate a criminal investigation, the Superintendent must cooperate with the police, in accordance with the Interagency Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting and Investigation Protocol.

    3.6 Reporting to a Child Welfare Worker
Although the primary responsibility for dealing with abuse allegations involving Board employees, volunteers, or contract service provider, rests with the Board as employer, there may still be a need to report to a Child Welfare Worker.  For example, there may be indications:

of abuse outside the scope of the Board investigation;
that the parents may respond to the abuse allegations in a way that suggests that they are unwilling or unable to take any action needed to protect the child; or
that the child is at risk of being abused by the parent.

Where there is reason to believe that abuse or neglect of a child has taken place outside the scope of the Board investigation and the parent is unwilling or unable to protect the child, or there is reason to believe that the parent is unwilling or unable to protect the child with respect to the abuse that is the subject of the Board investigation, school officials must report this to a Child Welfare Worker in accordance with the Child, Family and Community Service Act.

    3.7 Reporting to BC College of Teachers and other professional bodies
School employees and officials who are members of the BC College of Teachers have an obligation under the Teaching Profession Act (T.P.A. s. 27.1) to report to the Registrar of the College where they have reason to believe that another member is guilty of professional misconduct involving physical harm to a student, sexual abuse or sexual exploitation of a student or significant emotional harm to a student.  This requirement is in addition to the obligation of school officials to report the dismissal, suspension and discipline of members (or persons holding letters of permission) to the College under the School Act (S.A. s. 16).

If an employee or contractor is a registered member of another professional body, such as the BC College of Psychologists or the College of Registered Nurses of BC, there may be duties to report to that professional body. For example, under the Health Professions Act of BC, an employer who terminates or suspends a registered member based on a belief that the member’s continued practice of the health profession would be a danger to the public, must report to the professional body.

    3.8 Reporting to Board Insurers
If the circumstances indicate that a civil claim is likely to be made against the Board or its staff or volunteers as a result of the incident, the Secretary-Treasurer is responsible for ensuring that a report is made to the School Protection Program.

    4.0.  Where allegations of child abuse are made against school-aged students
School officials have the responsibility and authority under the School Act to investigate allegations that a student has abused another student within the school environment.  School officials may take disciplinary or other remedial action, in accordance with Board Policy.

School employees and officials also have responsibility to take appropriate action to safeguard a student who is the victim of abusive conduct by other students at school and to notify the parents of the students involved.

School officials may notify and/or consult the police or a Child Welfare Worker where appropriate, in accordance with the Interagency Child Abuse/Neglect Reporting and Investigation Protocol.  School authorities have discretion, in the circumstances of many minor offences, whether to deal with a matter through the school discipline process or whether to call in the police.  A report to a Child Welfare Worker is only required where there is reason to believe that the child’s parent is unable or unwilling to take action required to protect the child or where there is reason to believe that other abuse (including abuse of the alleged abuser) has taken place outside the scope of the Board investigation and the parent is unwilling or unable to protect the child (or the parent is implicated in the abuse).

Employees who make reports to a Child Welfare Worker should inform the school principal or the District Principal of Support Services.  

    4.1 Reporting to Board Insurers
If the circumstances indicate that a civil claim is likely to be made against the Board or its staff or volunteers as a result of the incident, the Secretary-Treasurer is responsible for ensuring that a report is made to the School Protection Program.

References:
BC Handbook for Action on Child Abuse and Neglect for Service Providers, 2007, Ministry of Children and Family Development
Responding to Child Welfare Concerns, 2007, Ministry of Children and Family Development
Child, Family and Community Service Act, sections 13 and 14
Health Professions Act , s. 32.2
School Act, sections 15, 16, 177
Teaching Profession Act, s. 27.1

APPENDIX A
Interagency Protocol for Reporting and Investigation of Child Abuse and Neglect in
School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert)

 

A. Statement of Purpose
The purpose of this protocol is to set out and clarify the practices of the agencies involved with the Board of Education of School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) (the “Board”) in responding to reports of child abuse and neglect, especially as they interact respecting:

  • Reporting suspected child abuse and neglect
  • Investigating suspected child abuse and neglect
  • Sharing information about suspected child abuse and neglect
  •  

The protocol is intended to:

  • Facilitate collaboration between the Parties to ensure the safety, well-being and protection of children.
  • Support and be consistent with the Board’s Child Protection Policy #1310 and Board Procedures for Reporting Child Abuse and Neglect.
  • Be consistent with relevant legislation including the Child, Family and Community Service Act, the School Act, and the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.
  • Supplement the BC Handbook for Action on Child Abuse and Neglect (“the Handbook”).  The Handbook contains important information not found in this protocol.

The protocol is not intended to create legal contractual relationships.

B. Terminology

In this protocol:

“CFCSA” refers to the Child, Family and Community Service Act, RSBC 1996, c. 46, as amended.

“Child” means a person under the age of 19.

“Criminal offence warranting police involvement” refers to an offence within police jurisdiction that either is required to be reported to police under school board policy or, in the judgment of the school administrator, requires the involvement of the criminal justice system to be dealt with appropriately. The courts have recognized that school authorities have discretion in the circumstances of many minor offences whether to deal with the matter through the school discipline process (which is more immediate in its consequences and so may be more effective) or whether to call in the police.  Not every potential offence warrants police involvement.[1]

“Child Welfare Worker” refers to a person delegated under the Child, Family and Community Service Act to provide child welfare services, including responses to suspected child abuse and neglect.  Both the Ministry of Children and Family Development and named delegated Aboriginal Family and Child Service Agencies employ Child Welfare Workers.

“Child Welfare Authority” refers to the Ministry of Children and Families or a delegated Aboriginal Family and Child Service Agency, as the case may be.

Nisga’a Child and Family Services and Northwest Inter-Nation Family and Child Services are both Aboriginal Child and Family Service Agency that have been delegated authority under the Child, Family and Community Service Act.

“The Handbook” refers to The BC Handbook for Action on Child Abuse and Neglect for Service Providers, 2007, published by the Ministry of Children and Family Development, or any successor publication.

“Needs Protection” refers to the situation of a child in any of the following circumstances, as defined by CFCSA s.13(1):

a) the child has been, or is likely to be, physically harmed by the child’s parent;
b) the child has been, or is likely to be, sexually abused or exploited by the child’s parent;
c) the child has been, or is likely to be, physically harmed, sexually abused or sexually exploited by another person and if the child’s parent is unwilling or unable to protect the child;
d) the child has been, or is likely to be, physically harmed because of neglect by the child’s parent;
e) the child is emotionally harmed by the parent’s conduct;
f) the child is deprived of necessary health care;
g) the child’s development is likely to be seriously impaired by a treatable condition and the child’s parent refuses to provide or consent to treatment;
h) the child’s parent is unable or unwilling to care for the child and has not made adequate provision for the child’s care;
i) the child is, or has been, absent from home in circumstances that endanger the child’s safety or wellbeing;
j) the child’s parent is dead and adequate provision has not been made for the child’s care;
k) the child has been abandoned and adequate provision has not been made for the child’s care; or
l) the child is in the care of a director or another person by agreement and the child's parent is unwilling or unable to resume care when the agreement is no longer in force.

Working definitions of child abuse and neglect are contained in The BC Handbook for Action on Child Abuse and Neglect for Service Providers (See pages 23-26.)

“Parties” means the agencies listed below as having approved this protocol.

“Principal” includes a vice-principal or other staff member designated by the principal of a Board school to fulfill the duties of the Principal under this Protocol Agreement.

“SA” refers to the School Act, RSBC 1996, c. 412, as amended.

“Superintendent” refers to the Superintendent of Schools appointed by the Board under the SA, and includes any person designated by the Superintendent to fulfill the Superintendent’s duties under this Protocol Agreement.  The designated person would be the District Principal of Student Support Services. 

C. Reporting and Investigation Procedures
The Parties agree that the attached tables set out their expectations of their own responsibilities and their expectations of the responsibilities of the other Parties. At the request of any Party, the Parties agree to meet, review the procedures set out in the attached tables and make amendments to supplement or amend them.

[1] . Legal references: R. v. Keukens, [1993] O.J. No. 1223; R. v G. (J.M.), (1986) 56 O.R. (2dd) 705.

D. Parties
The parties listed below agree to conduct their affairs in accordance with this Protocol.

Signed on behalf of School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) on October __, 2011:

 __________________________________
 [Name, Title]

Signed on behalf of Ministry of Children and Family Development (Prince Rupert) on October___, 2011: 

 __________________________________
 [Name, Title] 

Signed on behalf of Nisga’a Child and Family Services on October __, 2011:

__________________________________
 [Name, Title] 

Signed on behalf of Northwest Inter-Nation Family and Child Services on October__ , 2011:

 __________________________________
 [Name, Title]

Signed on behalf of the Prince Rupert RCMP on October __, 2011:               

__________________________________
[Name, Title]


1310-10A | Report of Suspected Child Abuse Form

Reference Title View

Report of Suspected Child Abuse - Form

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1320 | Communicable Diseases and Immunizations Policy

RATIONALE/PURPOSE

The Board of Education acknowledges its obligation under the Workers Compensation Act
(Part 6) and School Act (sections 91, 92) to provide a safe environment for students and Board employees and to ensure the health and safety of the public it serves.

POLICY

The Board understands the need to ensure the safety and well-being of students and staff within its jurisdiction. Every precaution will be taken to ensure that an individual's medical condition does not present a health and safety risk to students and Board employees. The Board supports appropriate procedures regarding infectious blood borne pathogens and immunizations, as described in the regulations.

The Board recognizes that a student with an infectious blood borne-disease is entitled to an educational program and, insofar as it is possible and prudent, shall be treated as any other student with a medical condition. The student's personal physician shall be responsible for evaluating the student's health.

A Board employee with an infectious blood-borne disease shall be treated as would any other employee with a medical condition. The employee's personal physician shall be responsible for evaluating the employee's health.

The Board endorses the position of Northern Health that all school-age children should be protected by immunization against all common, preventable diseases.
 

REFERENCES

  • Northern Health website:
    http:www.northernhealth.ca/YourHealth/PublicHealth/Immunizationand Vaccines.aspx  accessed online March 25, 2013
  • Province of British Columbia Healthlink BC Website, http://www.healthlinkbc.ca
    Blood and Body Fluid Precautions, accessed online March 27, 2016.

1320-10 | Communicable Disease Regulation

Under Section 109 of the School Act, School Boards are responsible for protecting students from exposure to a child with a serious communicable disease.  The School Board will base its decision upon the advice of the Medical Health Officer and deal with each situation in accordance with the following regulations.

AIDS AND HIV INFECTIONS

INTRODUCTION

Children and adults with a diagnosis of AIDS are those with the most serious form of illness related to HIV infection.  There are many more persons who are infected with the virus, perhaps unknowingly, and who have either a mild illness or no signs of infection at all.

The majority of infected children acquire the virus from their infected mothers in the perinatal period.  In utero or intrapartum, transmission occurs and at least one case has been reported in which breast milk transmission was the probable mechanism.  Sexual transmission is only likely with youth in their later teens and with adults.

The issue of concern is whether the child with HIV infection can transmit the infection to classmates and staff, and under what circumstances transmission is likely to occur.
 

RISKS ASSOCIATED WITH SCHOOL ATTENDANCE

A.    Risks of Infection to Classmates and Staff
In the everyday social contact setting of the school environment, there is no risk of transmission of the virus among children and staff.  There is a theoretical potential for transmission when open skin sores or broken mucous membranes come in contact with blood or other body fluids of an infected person.  These circumstances are more likely to occur in institutions for very young children who still lack bowel and/or bladder control and are diapered.
Also mentally handicapped children who lack control of their secretions and excretions or who exhibit aggressive behavior, such as biting or striking, pose a higher risk.

B.    Risks of the Child's Environment to the Child
The infected child may have immune system damage which renders the youngster more susceptible to infectious diseases such as chicken pox, measles, herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus.  The risk to the child is greater in the school or day care setting than in the home.  In specific disease contact situations this risk can be reduced by the prompt use of appropriate immunoglobulin.
The diagnosis of AIDS or associated illnesses evokes fear and even panic in most persons in contact with the infected individual.  To prevent social isolation and ostracism by classmates and teachers, confidentiality and child's right to privacy must be paramount when the safety of employees and students is not a concern.

C.    Risk of Transmission by Infected Adult
 Teachers and other staff who have an HIV infection pose no risks to other staff or students since casual social contact does not allow for the exchange of infectious body fluid.
 

RECOMMENDATIONS

A.    School Age Children

  1. A student with HIV infection should be allowed to attend school without restriction unless there are significant risks to others from the student's attendance.  Restrictions are for specific reason(s) beyond presence of HIV infection.
  2. Each student should be assessed on an individual basis by the attending physician and the Medical Officer for the school.  The assessment for attendance should be based on the behavior, development and physical condition of the student and the expected type of interaction with the others in that setting.  Involvement of the parent is essential to ensure that all facts are taken into account and that everyone understands the rationale for the final decisions.
  3. In general, school staff need not be informed that a student with HIV infection is in the school.  If, in the opinion of the School Medical Officer and the attending physician, it is necessary to inform school personnel of the student's infection, then the information shall be restricted to those staff who "need to know".  The parent must be made aware of the intention to inform and, if possible, should be a participant during the transmission of this information to ensure that everyone involved understands the situation and the implications of any actions which may be taken.  The decision to inform is most often required when the student's health status requires consideration of alternative or special educational arrangements.
  4. If the student's health permits and in the absence of special risk factors, the benefits of unrestricted school attendance outweigh the student's risk of acquiring potentially harmful infections in the school setting and the extremely remote risk of transmission of the infection in the school environment.  The condition of the student should be monitored regularly by the family physician and the School Medical Officer, and changes in the student's school program should be recommended if necessary.
  5. An uninfected student who has a family member with HIV infection should not be excluded from school.
  6. Routine screening of children for HIV infection is not warranted.

Since blood and body fluids may carry various infectious agents, all schools should be encouraged to adopt good hygiene practices for handling environmental soiling by blood, urine, stool, vomit or other body fluids.  School personnel involved in such cleaning should be taught to avoid exposure of open skin lesions or mucous membranes to blood or body fluids.


1330-10 | Immunization of Students

The School Board believes that all children should be protected by immunization against all common preventable diseases: measles, mumps, rubella, diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus and polio.  These immunizations should be up to date before school entry and the parents should keep a record of the student's current and future immunizations.

The School Board supports the need for a measles elimination program and requests that all children entering kindergarten or otherwise enrolling in School District No. 52
(Prince Rupert) for the first time show proof of measles immunization or a letter from the parents declaring that they do not want their child immunized against measles or a letter from a physician declaring that measles immunization is prohibited for medical reasons.  Each school Administrative Officer shall maintain a record of the requested information for each student enrolled.


1350 | Student Medications Policy

RATIONALE

The Board of Education recognizes its responsibility to ensure that students of school age attend school and acknowledges that some of these students may be in need of certain medication.

POLICY

It is the policy of the Board that in those cases where a student requires medication during school activities, the administration of such medication shall be the responsibility of the school principal. It shall be the responsibility of the parent or guardian to bring the matter to the attention of school principal.

Except in emergency situations, no employee of the Board shall administer medication or supervise the self-administration of medication unless it is carried out in accordance with the district procedures. Until such procedures are arranged, medication should not be administered, even though this may result in a student being absent from school for a few days.

It is recognized that the medication to be administered should not require any special skill or knowledge on the part of the school principal or designate.

REFERENCES

  • Regulation 1350-10 Medication for Students
  • Regulation 1350-10A Request for Administration of Medication at School
  • Regulation 1350-10B Student Medical Alert

1350-10 | Medication for Students Regulation

The Board of School Trustees recognizes its responsibility to ensure that students of school age attend school and that some of these students may be in need of certain medication.  In those cases where a student requires medication for reasons related to his health during school activities, the administration of such medication shall be the responsibility of the Administrative Officer of the school.  It shall be the responsibility of the parent to bring the matter to the Administrative Officer's attention.

It is recognized that the medication to be administered should not require any special skill or knowledge on the part of the Administrative Officer or his/her delegate.  Except in emergency situations, no employee of the School Board shall administer medication unless it is carried out in accordance with the provisions of the regulations of this Regulation.  Until such provisions are arranged, medication should not be administered, even though this may result in a student being absent from school for a few days.
 

1. PURPOSE

    1.1   To provide a means of keeping accurate information regarding medications required by students who have an identified continuing health problem and who need to take medication on a continuing basis while at school, i.e., for at least one    month, and who need assistance or supervision in taking their medication, or for students who may need emergency medication for allergic reaction.

    1.2   To provide a request form (Form 1350-10A) which includes physician order, parental consent and other significant data.
 

2.  PROCEDURE

    2.1   This record is to be used for students with an identified handicap or health problem:

       (a)   which makes it necessary for them to take medication while at school,

       (b)   who require this medication over an extended period, i.e., for at least one month,

       (c)   who need assistance or supervision from school staff in order to take their medication,

       (d)   or those who may require emergency medication for an allergic reaction.  (Parent completes “Student Medical Alert” – Form 1350-10B)

    2.2   The request form is given to the parent or guardian by the school Administrative Officer, or delegate, when the student is registered, or when the parent indicates that the medication is required at school.

    2.3   The parent or guardian completes Section "A" and takes the request form to the physician to have Section "B" completed.

    2.4   The parent then completes Section "C" and returns the form to the school.

    2.5   The P.H.N. reviews the form to ensure that the required information is complete and that the instructions are clear.  She/he may, if necessary, contact the parents or physician for further clarification.  She/he dates and signs Section "D".  An      extra space is provided in case there should be reason to revise or clarify instructions during the school year.

    2.6   Section "E" is for the convenience of the school and is intended to ensure that the person responsible for giving or supervising the medication has all necessary information.  Several spaces are allowed as this person may change throughout    the school year.

Any employee responsible for administration of a medication must review the information on the form and date and sign the form in Section "E".  Any employee has an unfettered right to refuse to accept responsibility for the administration of medication and may refuse to sign Section "E" or remove their name from Section "E".

   2.7   Section "F" is for the training documentation to be entered.

   2.8   Section "G" is the section for the administration of medication scheduling to be entered.

   2.9   The completed request form is to be kept in the school in an easily accessible place as determined by the Administrative Officer.

   2.10  A new request form should be completed each September and the previous one destroyed.

 

3.  FILING

   3.1   The Request for Administration of Medication at School card is filed in an easily accessible place in the school as determined by the school Administrative Officer.

   3.2   Student Medical Alert Form 1350-10B is completed by Parent/Guardian and information is shared with staff.   Form is displayed in conspicuous location in school main office.

 

 

 

 

 

 


 


1350-10A | Request for Administration of Medication at School - Form

Reference Title View

Request for Administration of Medication at School - Form

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1350-10B | Student Medical Alert - Form

Reference Title View

1350-10B

Student Medical Alert - Form

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1350-10C | Anaphylaxis Action Plan

Reference Title View

Anaphylaxis Action Plan

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1350-10D | Care of Students with Asthma

Reference Title View

Care of Students with Asthma

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1350-10E | Care of Students with Diabetes

Reference Title View

Care of Students with Diabetes

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1350-10F | Care of Students with Seizures

Reference Title View

Care of Students with Seizures

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1360-10 | Participation by Children with Down’s Syndrome in Physical Activities

Some Down's Syndrome children have an instability in the spine close to where it joins the skull. Participation in some physical activities by Down's Syndrome children with this weakness can result in very serious injury (atlantoaxial dislocation). Severe injury to the upper spinal cord may result. 

Therefore, in order to protect Down's Syndrome students, the Board of School Trustees requires that all Down's Syndrome students be properly screened by a medical doctor prior to their participation in physical activities. Down's syndrome students shall not be permitted to participate in physical activities without written approval by a medical practitioner permitting participation in physical activities. 

Physical activities for Down's Syndrome children with an instability in the spine close to where it joins the skull are identified as the following: 

gymnastics, diving, butterfly stroke in swimming, diving starts in swimming, high jump, pentathlon and soccer. 

  1. Down's Syndrome students may be permitted to participate in physical activities only after approval by a medical doctor to participate in such activities as defined by Board Policy. The permission shall be in writing. 
     
  2. The Administrative Officer is responsible for maintaining a record of the status of each Down's Syndrome student in regard to their possible instability in the spine. 
     
  3. The Administrative Officer shall advise staff of which Down's Syndrome students suffer from an instability in the spine or who have not yet been examined by a medical doctor. Such students shall be prohibited from participating in physical activities as defined in Policy. 

1370-10 | Restraint

Rationale 

The Board wishes to maintain a safe and secure environment for students and staff. In order to achieve this general goal, the Board accepts that on the occasion when the uncontrolled physical actions of a student: 

a) threaten to cause harm to self: 
b) threaten to cause harm to others; 
c) threaten to cause harm to property;  it may be necessary to physically restrain the student. 

When restraint is used it will be used with the least amount of force necessary to protect both restrainer and restrainee. 

Definition: Physical restraint is a judicious control measure applied temporarily to a student for the protection of that student, others or property, when in the opinion of the supervisory adult the threat of harm is immediate. 

Physical restraint should only be used in situations when there is an immediate risk to the student, others or property due to the uncontrolled physical behavior of the student. 

Restraint will only be used when the restrainer does not believe that safe control can be established in any other way. 

Physical restraint may be used inside or outside of the classroom and may be performed by any supervisory adult. 

The following guidelines are to be followed regarding the restraining measures themselves, the debriefing procedure to be used and the documentation of the incident. 
 

Restraining Measures 

Prior to imposing restraining measures, the restrainer will inform the student of the process that will be used. 

When possible physical contact should be conducted: 

  • with controlled, calm and reassuring statements for the restraint and describe the necessary behaviour for ending the restraint; 
  • with the least amount of force to protect student and restrainer; 
  • with the least amount of disturbance to the rest of the class; and 
  • in the presence of another adult when possible. 

Teachers and child care workers of students who have been identified as having a recent history of violent behaviour should be inserviced regarding appropriate restraint techniques. This training is to occur as approved by the District Principal/Director of Instruction who is responsible for Student Support Services. 

Parents/guardians of students who have been identified as having a recent history of violent behaviour shall be informed of the restraint techniques to be explored by the child care worker and/or teacher. 
 

Debriefing 

Debriefing should occur immediately with the student so that both the restrainer and the student are comfortable with the resolution and that the student is encouraged to: 

  • state what happened; 
  • state the behavioural rule or expectation; and 
  • state a more appropriate behavioural plan. 
     

Documentation 

Documentation and review includes: 

  • time and location of incident; 
  • written statements that lead to and describe the incident and the resolution (direct quotes are advisable); 
  • notification of restraining to the principal should be done as soon as possible; 
  • the principal shall arrange for the parent/guardian to be notified as soon as practical after the incident; 
  • names of all people involved or witnessing the incident; 
  • debriefing with personnel directly involved in the restraint; 
  • if restraint is required more than once, a meeting with concerned personnel and parent/guardian in order to discuss future strategies; 
  • if restraint occurs in a public space, persons in charge (e.g., manager of the Civic Centre, manager of the shopping mall) should be informed of the situation whenever possible; 
  • include WCB documentation when appropriate. 

(Please refer to Prince Rupert School District Violence Prevention Manual page 17, “Dealing with Violent Students” for further information.) 


1380 | Anaphylaxis Policy

POLICY

In accordance with Ministry of Education requirements, the Board provides this policy and regulation relating to the response to anaphylaxis in school settings. This policy acknowledges the principles identified in the BC Anaphylactic and Child Safety Framework.

The safety, health, and well-being of students is the primary responsibility of parents or guardians, and is a shared responsibility among parents or guardians, Boards, school employees, students, and health care workers.

School principals have overall responsibility for student safety in school, including implementation of anaphylaxis safety plans in accordance with the requirements of Board policy and procedures.

Parents or guardians of student are responsible to inform the school about their children’s potential risk for anaphylaxis and for providing ongoing health support services.

Every employee exposed to individual student emergency response plans has a duty to maintain the confidentiality of all student personal health information.

The Board will minimize the risk of exposure for students at risk of anaphylaxis to allergens, without depriving the student at risk of normal peer relations or placing unreasonable restrictions on other students.

 

REFERENCES

Ministerial Order 232/07 – Anaphylaxis Protection Order

British Columbia Anaphylactic and Child Safety Framework

1380-10 - Anaphylaxis Regulation


1380-10 | Anaphylaxis

Definition

Anaphylaxis is a sudden and severe allergic reaction, which can be fatal, requiring immediate medical emergency measures be taken.

A.   Signs and symptoms of Anaphylaxis

  1. Signs and symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can occur within minutes of exposure to an offending substance.  Reactions usually occur within two hours of exposure, but in rarer cases can develop hours later.  Specific warning signs as well as the severity and intensity of symptoms can vary from person to person and sometimes from attach to attack in the same person. 
  2. Signs and symptoms of an anaphylactic reaction can involve any of the following symptoms which may appear alone or in any combination, regardless of the triggering allergen:
    • Skin:  hives, swelling, itching, warmth, redness, rash;
    • Respiratory (Breathing):  wheezing, shortness of breath, throat tightness, cough, hoarse voice, chest pain/tightness, nasal congestion or hay fever-like symptoms *runny, itchy nose and watery eyes, sneezing), trouble swallowing;
    • Gastrointestinal:  nausea, pain/cramps, vomiting, diarrhea;
    • Cardiovascular:  pale/blue colour, weak pulse, passing out, dizzy/lightheaded, shock;
    • Other:  anxiety, feeling of “impending doom”, headache, uterine cramps in females.
  3. The most dangerous symptoms of an allergic reaction involve:Both of these symptoms may lead to death if untreated.
    • Cardiovascular:  pale/blue colour, weak pulse, passing out, dizzy/lightheaded, shock;
    • Breathing difficulties caused by swelling of the airways, and
    • A drop in blood pressure indicated by dizziness, light-headedness or feeling faint/weak.
      • BOTH OF THESE SYSTEMS MAY LEAD TO DEATH IF UNTREATED
  4.  Because of the unpredictability of reactions, early symptoms should never be ignored, especially if the person has suffered an anaphylactic reaction in the past.  If an allergic student expresses any concern that a reaction might be starting, the student should always be taken seriously.  When a reaction begins, it is important to respond immediately, following instructions in the student’s Emergency Response Plan.  The cause of the reaction can be investigated later.

 

B.  Identifying Students at Risk

  1. It is the responsibility of the parents/guardians with anaphylactic children to notify the school principal when a child is diagnosed as being at risk of anaphylaxis and provide the school with updated medical information annually.  An adult student with anaphylaxis is also required to provide this information.
  2. The parents/guardians/adult student must further provide the school with updated medical information whenever there is a significant change related to their child/children or self. 
  3. The parent/guardian or adult student must outline the possible symptoms and requested intervention by school staff.
  4. The parent/guardian or adult student shall familiarize him/herself with Board Policy and School Anaphylaxis Administrative Guidelines.
  5. The parent/guardian or adult student shall provide the required medication to the school with instructions for intervention.
  6. The Emergency Response Plan will include:
    • A completed copy of form 1350-10A Request for Administration of Medication at School
    • A completed copy of form 1350-10B Student Medical Alert
    • A completed copy of the form 1350-10C Anaphylaxis Action Plan
  7. A copy of the current Request for Administration of Medication at School must be filed in the student’s file and copies must be located in the areas designated by the Principal.  The form must be readily available in the event of emergency. 
  8. The Principal shall establish and maintain a School Anaphylaxis Management Plan that shall include the development and maintenance of strategies that reduce the risk of exposure to anaphylactic agents in all areas of the school.

 

C.  Record Keeping:  Monitoring & Reporting

  1. The school Principal is responsible for keeping accurate records for each students  at-risk of life-threatening allergies
  2. A record with information relating to the specific allergies for an identified anaphylactic student will form part of the record required to be maintained under section 2 of the Permanent Student Record Order.  That record shall include the Emergency Response Plan.
  3. School Principals must monitor and report information about anaphylactic incidents to the Superintendent of Schools in aggregate form, to include number of at-risk anaphylactic students and number of anaphylactic incidents.
  4. All staff members, including support staff, teachers-teaching-on-call and when necessary, volunteers, must be made aware of anaphylactic students and appropriate procedures.
  5. In a school where a student has been identified as at-risk for anaphylaxis, the Principal shall enlist the support and cooperation of all staff, students, and parents/guardians so as to reduce the potential risk to the student

 

D.  Emergency Response Plan

Student Level Emergency Procedure Plan

  1. For each student with identified life-threatening allergies, the school must develop and maintain an accurate, up-to-date Emergency Response Plan.  The plan should be developed in conjunction with the student’s parents and the student (where age appropriate), and the plan must be approved by a qualified physician, allergist, or public health nurse.
  2. The student Emergency Response Plan must be signed by the student’s parents, the student (where age appropriate) and the physician, and must be kept on file at readily accessible locations.
  3. The student Emergency Response Plan shall include at minimum:
    • The diagnosis;
    • The current treatment regimen;
    • Who within the school community is to be informed about the plan (e.g. teachers, volunteers, classmates); and
    • Current emergency contact information for the student’s parents/guardian
  4. The student’s emergency response plan shall also explicitly address:
    • The parent’s responsibility for advising the school about any change/s in the student’s condition; and
    • The school’s responsibility for updating records
  5. Those exposed to individual student Emergency Response Plans have a duty to maintain the confidentiality of all student personal health information.

School Level Emergency Procedure Plan

  1. All schools must have an emergency protocol in place to ensure responders know what to do in an emergency.  The emergency protocol shall include:
    • Administering an auto-injector;
    • Calling emergency medical care (911)
    • Calling student’s parents;
    • Administering second dose (within 10 to 15 minutes if symptoms have not improved)

 

E.  Use of Medical Information
The use of medical identifying information such as the Medic Alert® is strongly recommended.  To provide a uniform standard of identification, boards of education are required to include an education plan for anaphylactic students and their parents to encourage the use by anaphylactic students of medical identifying information.

 

F.  Provision and Storage of Medication
School policy must identify the central, unlocked location where medication will be stored.  Additionally, schools must ensure that parents/guardians are informed that it is their responsibility:

  1. Provide appropriate medication for their anaphylactic child;
  2. To inform the school where the anaphylactic child’s medication will be kept – i.e. with the student, in the student’s classroom, and/or other locations;
  3. To inform the school when they deem the child competent to carry their own medication/s, and that the child understands they must carry their medication on their person at all times;
  4. To provide a second auto-injector to be stored in a central, safe but unlocked location;
  5. To ensure anaphylaxis medications have not expired; and
  6. To ensure they replace expired medications.

 

G.  Allergy Awareness, Prevention, & Avoidance Strategies
While it is impossible to eliminate all potential allergens from the school environment, schools should create an allergy-aware environment in response to the most common triggers for anaphylaxis: food allergens and insect stings and for managing risk associated with rarer allergies to other substances, for example when a child is identified with allergies to medications, exercise, latex.

 

H.  ​Staff Development and Training

Appropriate training is a critical component to effectively managing risk associated with anaphylaxis. 

  1. The Principal shall be responsible for ensuring that school-based staff is informed as to identification of at-risk students and trained annually in
    • Signs and symptoms
    • Common allergens
    • Avoidance strategies
    • Emergency procedures
    • Emergency plans
    • Methods of communication with and strategies to educate and raise awareness of parents, students, employees, and volunteers about anaphylaxis.
  2. The Northern Health Department shall be contacted to provide training to all staff on anaphylaxis management and administration of an epinephrine auto-injector (Epipen©) at the beginning of each school year or as soon as an at-risk individual(s) has been identified at the school.
  3. Should staff change at any time throughout the year, it is the responsibility of the Principal to inform and provide training for new staff members(s) and Teachers-Teaching-On-Call or substitute Education Assistants. 
  4. Direct training is provided to all those reasonably expected to have supervisory responsibility of school-age and pre-school students (e.g. school personnel, teachers-teaching-on-call, foodservice staff, and volunteers); best practice suggests training should include student peers, depending on age and maturity.
  5. Distinction is made between needs of younger and older anaphylactic students.
  6. School principals should communicate to all school community members (students, parents, teachers, volunteers, etc.) the school’s anaphylaxis policies and procedures.

 

Related Policies and Procedures:

1380  Anaphylaxis Policy

1350-10A  Request for Administration of Medication at School

1350-10B  Student Medical Alert

1380-10C  Anaphylaxis Action Plan


1410 | District Code of Conduct Policy

POLICY 
The Board of Education has the responsibility to set expectations for student behavior in schools as part of its governance role for the district. 

The Board believes that schools should be safe, welcoming, caring and orderly places where all students are encouraged to succeed and to engage in their educational programs with a sense of hope, purpose and control. Such an environment is best built on a foundation of respect (in Sm’algyax, Łoomsk): respect for others, for property and for community. 

The Board is committed to the principles and values set out in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms and the BC Human Rights Code. In particular, the Board is committed to providing a working and learning environment free from discrimination regarding any accommodation, service, or facility customarily available to the public, and also free from discriminatory decisions on the basis of the race, colour, ancestry, place of origin, religion, marital status, family status, physical or mental disability, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or age of that person or class of persons.

The Board believes that the responsibility for student behavior and conduct in schools is shared among students, staff, parents and guardians in order to create a safe, caring and orderly learning and working environment.

The District Code of Conduct Regulations provide a framework with respect to expectations for student behavior while at school, during school related activities whether on or off school property, or engaging in an activity that has an impact on or connection with the school environment. 

Individual school codes of conduct are to be developed within this framework by the principal in a collaborative process which includes representatives of staff, students, parents and guardians.  

Students and employees have the responsibility to conduct themselves in accordance with the codes of conduct established by the school district and by their school. Failure to comply with district expectations may result in appropriate consequences.

Whenever possible and where appropriate, consequences for unacceptable conduct shall be restorative in nature.  Restorative and other measures, including student suspension and exclusion from school may be necessary for those occasions when efforts fail to result in a student complying with the expected conduct standards.  Students will be disciplined in a timely and fair manner, and such discipline shall be in accordance with district regulations. 

 

 

REFERENCES

2310 - - Protection of Students and Maintenance of Order Policy
1410-10 - - District Code of Conduct Regulation
1410-20 - - Use and or Possession of Illegal Drugs and Alcohol  Regulation
1420-10 - - Student Responsibilities, Discipline and Suspension  Regulation
1430 - - District Discipline Committee Policy
1440-10 - - Multiculturalism  Regulation
1440-20 - - Sexual Orientation  Regulation


1410-10 | District Code of Conduct

A.  Scope of the District Code of Conduct

  1. The District Code of Conduct applies to students of the school district engaged in, present at, or attending:
  • School or any activity on school premises whether during a regular school day, outside the regular school day, or on a day that is not a school day;
  • Travel on a school bus or other transportation for the purpose of attending school activities, whether or not it has been contracted or arranged by the school district or school;
  • Any activity sponsored, organized or participated in by the school regardless of the time or place;
  • Any activity in and around the school premises occurring during the school day that involves the property of neighbouring residents, or that constitutes mischief or abusive behaviour;
  • Any activity which may have a connection with the maintenance of order and discipline at a school.
    • The school principal has the authority to respond to student misconduct occurring outside the school day or school-related or sponsored activities (e.g., cyberbullying in the evening) if the principal determines the conduct may negatively impact the school environment.
    • The district and school will cooperate with the outside agencies and police (as per the Child Protection Act) in cases where students violate the law.

B.  Conduct Expectations

  1. The Board expects students to conduct themselves in the following manner:
  • Maintain courteous and respectful relationships with fellow students, teachers, support staff, and others involved in the school system;
  • Respect public and personal property;
  • Adhere to all classroom, school and district rules and policies;
  • Comply with the reasonable directives of a teacher or other employee of the school district;
  • Maintain appropriate standards of hygiene, dress and language;
  • Maintain a healthy lifestyle and attitude;
  • Attend school daily and promptly at the appointed hours;
  • Work diligently and respectfully at their studies without disrupting the work of others;
  • Demonstrate respect for all people, both in and outside school in compliance with the BC Human Rights Code – See #G below;
  • Comply with the Tobacco and Vapour Products Control Act 2016 prohibiting the use of tobacco or vapour products on school property.

     2.  The Board regards the following as examples of serious misconduct which are not acceptable in the district’s schools and workplaces:

  • Bullying (including cyberbullying);
  • Verbal or physical harassment, disrespect, and/or intimidation;
  • Physical or emotional violence;
  • Discrimination contrary to the BC Human Rights Code;
  • The possession, use and/or trafficking of illegal or restricted drugs, alcohol, or other harmful substances – See Regulation 1410-20;
  • The possession and/or use of weapons;
  • The possession and/or use of fireworks or incendiary devices;
  • The possession and/or use of noxious or toxic substances;
  • Engaging in conduct contrary to the District or School Code of Conduct and/or any school rule or Board policy;
  • Taking retaliation against a person who has reported incidents of unacceptable behaviour – See #H below.

C.   Consequences for Unacceptable Conduct

Where appropriate, consequences for unacceptable conduct should be restorative in nature and should provide students with the opportunity to change behaviour. Other measures, including student suspension and exclusion from school may be necessary for those occasions when other interventions fail to result in a student complying with the expected conduct standards. In such instances, disciplinary actions must recognize and adhere to certain principles.

  1. Each instance of student misconduct must be dealt with on an individual basis taking into consideration the individual circumstances of the student.
  2. Each case of student misconduct shall be dealt with as expeditiously as possible.
  3. Students who contravene the District or School Codes of Conduct will be subject to consequences reflective of the age, maturity and developmental levels of the student and the severity and frequency of the unacceptable conduct:
  • Consequences should be progressive in nature;
  • As students become older, behaviour expectations become higher and consequences of unacceptable behaviour become greater;
  • Severe, pervasive, or retaliatory behaviour will warrant stronger consequences and may lead to a referral to the Superintendent of Schools.

      4.  Discipline will be fair, consistent and meaningful, for the purpose of making restitution and enhancing student responsibility and self-discipline.

      5.  Special considerations may apply to students with special needs if these students are unable or do not comply with a Code of Conduct due to a disability of an intellectual, physical, sensory, emotional or behavioural nature. When students with identified special needs require intervention regarding their conduct, the school Principal will ensure that:

  • Such students have been adequately assessed;
  • Appropriate interventions are applied before discipline is considered;
  • The grounds for suspension are clear and appropriate;
  • Meaningful education programs and/or interventions are offered during any period of suspension;
  • Planning is undertaken for successful re-entry of the student if suspension is imposed.

      6.  In cases of property damage, the School Act assigns a liability for costs to the parents and student(s) involved.

 

D.  Suspensions

Suspension from school is an action of last resort when all other efforts have failed, or in those instances in which the misconduct is deemed to be of a serious enough nature that the student’s continued presence in the school may be detrimental to the well-being of students or staff, or to the overall school environment. In such cases:

  1. School Principals have the authority to suspend a student from school for up to five (5) consecutive school days;
  2. In the event of a suspension, the school Principal shall immediately report it in writing to the student’s parent(s)/guardian(s) and to the Superintendent of Schools or designate. The report should include the dates involved, reason(s), date of reinstatement, and advice to parents regarding alternatives they may pursue, including reference to the Student and/or parent Appeal By-law (By-Law #4) – See #6 below;
  3. If, in the opinion of the school Principal, an infraction is of a serious enough nature to warrant a suspension of greater than five (5) days, the school Principal shall consult with the Superintendent of Schools or designate.

 

E.  Record-Keeping

The Board expects that district and school administration and staff will maintain accurate and reliable records which allow the monitoring and tracking of individual, school and district-wide student conduct data over time.

 

F.  Appeals

The school Principal responsible for imposing discipline on a particular student shall advise parents and students that discipline decisions significantly affecting the education, health or safety of a student entitled to an educational program in the district are subject to appeal as provided by s. 11 of the School Act and Board By-Law #4 – Student and/or Parent Appeal Bylaw.

 

G.  BC Human Rights Code

  1. The Board of Education recognizes that the BC Human Rights Code prohibits discrimination, which is defined as an intentional or unintentional act which adversely affects a person or group on the basis of prejudice.
  2. In order to “promote a climate of understanding and respect where all are equal in dignity and rights” (BC Human Rights Code), the Board supports the values expressed in the BC Human Rights Code prohibiting discrimination based on race, colour, ancestry, place of origin, religion, marital status, family status, physical and mental ability, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or age.
  3. The Board therefore expects that students shall, at all times, engage in behaviour which is inclusive and respectful of every person and in particular is respectful of minorities and the diversity of Canadian society.

 

H.  Retaliation

The Board will take all reasonable steps to prevent retaliation by a person against a student who has made a complaint of a breach of a Code of Conduct.

 

I.  School Codes of Conduct

Within the framework of the District Code of Conduct, each school shall establish a written School Code of Conduct that will govern student conduct. School principals will ensure these codes are:

  1. Reflective of the standards outlined in Safe, Caring, and Orderly Schools, 2008;
  2. Developed collaboratively with staff, parents and students;
  3. Supportive of the values expressed in the BC Human Rights Code prohibiting discrimination based on race, colour, ancestry, place of origin, religion, marital status, family status, physical and mental ability, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, or age;
  4. Made available to the public;
  5. Distributed to students, parents and employees of the School Board at the beginning of each school year.
  6. Provided to students and parents who enroll in the school during the school year;
  7. Provided to employees of the Board who are assigned to the school during the school year when they are so assigned;
  8. Displayed prominently in the school;
  9. Reviewed annually with individuals or groups the school considers are representative of:
  • employees of the Board;
  • parents, and
  • students

       in order to assess the effectiveness of the School Code of Conduct in addressing current school safety issues;

      10.  Actively “taught” as part of the regular classroom and school experience.

 

References:

Ministry Document: Safe, Caring, and Orderly Schools (2008)

1410 District Code of Conduct Policy

1410-20 Use and or Possession of Illegal Drugs and Alcohol Regulation

1420-10 Student Responsibilities, Discipline and Suspension Regulation

1430 District Discipline Committee Policy

1430-10 District Discipline Committee Regulation

1440-20 Sexual Orientation/Gender Identity and Expression Regulation


1410-20 | Use and/or Possession of Illegal Drugs and Alcohol

The Board of Education does not condone the use of illegal drugs or alcohol in district schools or school sponsored activities regardless of whether the activity takes place inside or outside of the district’s geographical boundaries.

The following process will occur if a student is found to be under the influence, or in possession, of drugs and/or alcohol while under the supervision of the school;

  1. Parents or guardians will be contacted to take the student home.
  2. Parents or guardians will be invited to attend a family meeting at the school as soon as possible, and prior to the student returning to school.  They will meet with the School Based Team which may include Principal or Vice-Principal/s, school counsellor, Aboriginal Family Resource Worker, Drug and Alcohol Counsellor/Youth worker, or others.  At the family meeting, the following will occur: 
    • Discussion and development of an individualized program to be completed by the student, taking into account the age and developmental needs of the student, preferably in-school in a designated space (under supervision) prior to returning to regular classes.  This program may include:
      1. Work from teachers.
      2. Inquiry work developed collaboratively between the student and a Counsellor or other support worker.
      3. Restitution.
      4. Packaged material re: drug and alcohol use and abuse.
      5. Other.
    • Discussion regarding ongoing supports to the student and family as necessary, for example, continued counselling, academic support, treatment options, medical assistance, etc.
  3. The student may return to regular classes after the individualized program has been satisfactorily completed.  The time frame for completion may vary.

 

For repeated offence/s:
The Parent/guardians will be contacted to take the student home.  A School Based Team meeting will occur to determine next steps which may include: 

  1. Repeat of procedure as for first time.
  2. District Discipline Committee meeting.
  3. Out of school suspension approved by the Superintendent or designate.

1420-10 | Student Responsibilities, Discipline and Suspension

It is the Board's belief that commonly accepted standards of student and parent behaviour will be expected by the schools. This behaviour will be clarified in school rules that are authorized by the Administrative Office of the school. These rules shall be distributed to all students, parents, staff and the Superintendent of Schools. They shall be communicated in a clear manner to the students. 

School rules shall apply to the general conduct of students, both on school premises and during activities that are off school premises and that are organized or sponsored by the school. School rules shall also apply to school bus, air, train and ferry transportation. 

Discipline is regarded primarily as an internal teaching and administrative function in each school, in cooperation with the student and his or her parent. Every effort should be made through parental conferences and other means to bring about a satisfactory solution to problems which arise. The Board shall support its teachers and Administrative Officers in the maintenance of proper order and discipline provided the methods used are permissible under the School Act, Regulations, Minister of Education Orders and any school district policies or regulations which may be applicable. 

It is the Regulation of the Board that all reasonable measures shall be taken to retain students at school. Nevertheless, an Administrative Officer or a teacher authorized by the Board may suspend a student, or may remove a suspension that he or she has imposed on a student. 

SUSPENSION PROCEDURES 

  1. The Principal of a school is responsible for administrating and supervising the school including the general conduct of students, both on school premises and during activities that are off school premises and that are organized or sponsored by the school, and shall, in accordance with the policies of the Board, exercise paramount authority within the school in matters concerning the discipline of students. (School Act Regulation 5 (7)(g)) Hence, discipline in the school shall be applied in accordance with the terms of the school rules authorized by the Principal. 
     
  2. Discipline is most effective when Administrative Officers and teachers work in co-operation with the student and parent(s) or guardian(s). Administrative Officers and teachers shall make every effort to ensure that in the matter of student discipline they act as a kind, firm and judicious parent or guardian. 
     
  3. Administrative Officers shall keep appropriate documentation on significant matters of student discipline. 
     
  4. When a student fails to comply with the authorized school rules, an Administrative Officer of a school or a teacher authorized by him or her may: 

    a) give him or her due warning, 
    b) inform the parents or guardians of the student by letter that the student has been warned, 
    c) arrange, when practicable, for an interview with the parents or guardians of the student at the school. 

  5. Administrative Officers or a teacher authorized by the Board may suspend a student for up to five (5) days when it is concluded that: 

    a) the student has been wilfully disobedient to a teacher or any other employee of the Board carrying out responsibilities approved by the Board, or; 
    b) the behaviour of the student has a harmful effect on the character or persons of other students. 

  6. In some cases of serious wilful disobedience and/or serious harmful behaviour it may be necessary to suspend without following the steps outlined in number 4 above. 
     
  7. The Administrative Officer or authorized teacher shall forthwith report the circumstances and duration of the suspension by registered or hand delivered letter to the parents or guardians of the student and shall, where possible, report the circumstances and duration of the suspension to the parents or guardians in person or by telephone. A copy of the letter must be sent to the Superintendent of Schools. 
     
  8. The Administrative Officer shall provide an educational program by providing assignments to the student at the time the suspension is made and may condition the removal of the suspension upon an assessment of the work done by the student. 
     
  9. If, within a reasonable period of time after a warning and/or suspension, a student fails to make a serious effort to reform, the Administrative Officer may request the intervention of the Superintendent of Schools or his or her designate. This intervention may be in the form of a meeting which includes the student, parents or guardians, the Administrative Officer and others. This meeting shall focus upon the educational needs of the student and attempt to raise the awareness level of the responsibilities of the student and parents or guardians. 
     
  10. On-going disobedience and/or harmful behaviour, in spite of a number of actions attempting to bring about correction, may lead to a lengthy suspension imposed by an Administrative Officer. 
     
  11. Suspensions longer than ten school days are considered to have a significant effect on the education of a student. The suspended student and/or parents or guardians may appeal such a decision under Student and/or Parent Appeal Board Bylaw #4. 

The Administrative Officer may suspend a student for up to five (5) days. Suspensions for greater than five days must be approved by the Superintendent, or designate. Any student suspended for more than ten days shall be provided, by the Administrative Officer, with a copy of the appeal procedure to the student and parents or guardians. 


1430 | District Discipline Committee

RATIONALE

The Board of Education believes that the reporting of incidents which pose a serious threat to the safe and orderly conduct of a school’s environment must be handled appropriately to ensure reasonableness, procedural fairness and natural justice for all involved. 

POLICY

The Board of Education shall establish a District Discipline Committee to review serious disciplinary situations involving students and to report their decisions regarding appropriate disciplinary action to the Board.  

This policy applies in all cases in which a student is prohibited from attendance at school for contravention of the District Code of Conduct/ and/or the School Code of Conduct.  The basis for suspension, re-admittance or refusal to continue to offer an educational program to students will be conducted in accordance with Sections 6, 26 and 85 of the School Act.  

Restorative action is one of the guiding principles for this policy.  

Related Policies:      1430         District Code of Conduct
                                 1410-20    Use of Illegal Drugs or Alcohol
                                 3110        School Bus and Ferry Discipline
                                 4210        Weapons


1430-10 | District Discipline Committee Regulation

1.0    Procedures for District Discipline Committee Referral 

1.1     When a serious disciplinary situation involving a student arises, the principal may refer the student to the Superintendent of Schools (or his/her designate) for review.

1.2    When a principal and the superintendent (or designate) have reviewed an incident of exceptional severity and referred it to the District Discipline Committee, the following procedures are to be followed by the principal: 

    1.2.1    contact the student’s parent or guardian;

    1.2.2    send a letter to the parent or guardian by registered mail.  The letter should include the provisions of the School Act relating to the incident;

    1.2.3    send a copy of the letter to the superintendent;

    1.2.4    give a copy of the letter, if possible, to the student to take home. 
 
1.3     Upon receiving the necessary documentation and letter, the superintendent (or designate) may arrange a meeting of the District Discipline Committee with the student, the parent(s) or guardian(s) and the principal.  A detailed report of the student’s school record and the incident will be discussed at the committee meeting.  The report of the principal shall include: 

    1.3.1    identification of the student – birth date, address, telephone number, parents’ or guardians’ names, school and placement;

    1.3.2    copies of relevant school records – permanent record card, medical report, attendance records, discipline records, report card marks;

    1.3.3    anecdotal record of the incident that was recorded as soon as possible after the incident occurred.  
 
1.4    The committee shall give the student and the parent(s) or guardian(s) an opportunity to appear before it to speak to the issues of subsequent placement or program offering.  The chairperson of the committee will facilitate this process. 

     1.5    The committee may seek the input of other agencies involved with the
    student and make a decision regarding appropriate action.  The parent(s) or guardian(s) of the student and the principal will be notified in writing of the decision.  The District Discipline Committee shall report the decision to the Board of Education.  

     1.6    The District Discipline Committee may decide to refuse to continue an
    educational program.  This decision is subject to appeal under Section 11 of the School Act.  

     1.7    Following the District Discipline Committee’s hearing, the Chair will inform
    the school and parent(s)/guardian(s) in writing of the final decision.  The letter will include:

        1.7.1     the student’s date of return to school, the school to be attended, and the conditions under which the student will return to school; or

        1.7.2     other arrangements for a student under sixteen (16) years of age to continue his/her education. 

2.0 Appeal of a District Discipline Decision

2.1    The parent(s)/guardian(s) will be informed of their right to appeal the decision of the District Discipline Committee to the Board of Education under School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) Appeal Procedure Bylaw#4 (Student and/or Parent Appeal)

3.0 Refusal to Continue to Offer an Educational Program

 3.1    The Board delegates authority to the Superintendent or designate under
    Section 85 (3) of the School Act to decide to refuse to continue to offer an educational program to a student sixteen (16) years of age or older if that student:

        3.1.1    has refused to comply with the code of conduct, other rules and policies, and /or
    
        3.1.2    has failed to apply himself or herself to his or her studies

 3.2    The Board delegates authority to the Superintendent or designate under School Act Section 85 (2) (d), to refuse to continue an educational program for a student under sixteen (16) years of age and other arrangements will be made for them   to continue their education.  


1440-10 | Multiculturalism

"Every individual is equal before and under the law and has the right to the equal protection and equal benefit of the law without discrimination and, in particular, without discrimination based on race, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, sex, age, mental or physical disability."

Equality Rights, S.15 (a) Charter of Rights and Freedoms

The Board holds the position that students of all ethnic and cultural backgrounds shall have the opportunity to develop their educational potential in School District No. 52.

The Board recognizes that the population of the district's schools consists of people from varied ethnic and cultural backgrounds.  The Board believes that this mix of cultures provides a potential environment of greater understanding and respect for the various cultures within our community.

The Board is committed to a Regulation of respect and acceptance of many cultures within our schools and encourages the development of awareness, understanding, and respect for others of different ethnic, cultural and linguistic heritages.  In this regard the Board encourages and is receptive of community input.

Definition:  Culture is an expression of a person's heritage through such variables as religion, family, home, community, language, dress, aesthetics and recreation.

A.    INSERVICE

  1. Teachers and district staff are encouraged to develop locally initiated projects to recognize the multicultural nature of their school and this district and which fosters greater understanding and respect for the various cultures in our community.
  2. Administrative Officers are encouraged to facilitate inservice on the various cultures in their schools.
  3. Administrative Officers, where appropriate, should make use of various cultural groups as a resource in providing inservice or developing programs.

B.    HOME SCHOOL RELATIONS

  1. That schools shall make their communities aware of their practices on multiculturalism.
  2. Each school, through its normal promotion of multiculturalism, should ensure that all concerned are aware that verbal exchanges involving racially and ethnically derogatory terms are not acceptable.
  3. That the resources of the school-community should be used in the effort to develop good cross-cultural relationships.

C.    CURRICULUM AND LEARNING RESOURCES

  1. The District Resource Centre and schools should develop their resource materials and library holdings to support multicultural teaching and reflect cultural and ethnic diversity.
  2. An inventory of multicultural resources be compiled and made available to teachers.
  3. Schools, in selecting ancillary teaching materials, should ensure they are not culturally biased or racially stereotyped.

1440-20 | Sexual Orientation/Gender Identity and Expression

The Board of School Trustees believes that all public schools in this district shall be safe for everyone.  We recognize and value the diversity found within its school communities and believe that each individual contributes to the strength of the district's culture.  The Board also recognizes that students and other school community members with diverse sexual orientations or gender identities face a unique set of challenges within our schools and communities.  In accordance with this regulation, and all relevant laws of more senior governing bodies, School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert):

  1. Prohibits any form of discrimination, intimidation or harassment against any person based on gender identity or expression, or sexual orientation.
  2. Encourages members of the school community to welcome, include and support all others regardless of their gender identity or expression, or sexual orientation.
  3. Instructs that all schools in the district put in place procedures and practices that support this regulation. 

The School District will provide an environment for all members of the school community to work and learn, free from fear, discrimination, and harassment, while also promoting proactive strategies and guidelines to ensure that all students, employees and families, irrespective of sexual orientation, gender identity, or gender expression, are welcomed and included in all aspects of education and school life, and are treated with respect and dignity. 

The purpose of this regulation is to define appropriate behaviours and actions in order to prevent discrimination and harassment through greater awareness of and responsiveness to their harmful effects.  This regulation is also to ensure that all complaints are taken seriously and dealt with expeditiously and effectively.  The regulation will also raise awareness and improved understanding regarding the variations of sexual orientation and gender identity or expression.  By valuing diversity and respecting differences, students and staff act in accordance with Ministry established principles related to diversity. 

It is the responsibility of all administrators, teachers and support staff to work together to build school communities which are positive and welcoming and will:
    (a)    foster respect, inclusion, fairness and equity;
    (b)    set, communicate and establish clear expectations for acceptable conduct;
    (c)    provide students, through various techniques, information that will lead to greater understanding, acceptance and support for all students. 

Social responsibility, including information, issues and attitudes related to sexual orientation. gender identity, or gender expression is not assigned to a particular grade or subject area; instead, it is a responsibility shared among all staff.

Within each school, staff will take concrete actions to ensure that the school is more welcoming and safe for all students irrespective of sexual orientation or gender identity. 

Therefore, School Codes of Conduct must include language that prohibits fear-promoting, harassing or discriminatory language and behaviour toward students, employees or others based on their real or perceived sexual orientation, or gender identification or expression.

 

 

Related Policy and Regulations
1440-10        Multiculturism Regulation


1510-10A | Student and or Parent Appeal - Form

Reference Title View

1510-10A

Student and or Parent Appeal - Form

view »

1510-20 | Student or Parent Travel Expense for Appeals

This regulation applies to students in attendance at the Hartley Bay school.

The Superintendent of Schools or designate may authorize reimbursement to parents and/or students of all or part of their expenses for travelling from Hartley Bay to Prince Rupert to attend appeals.


1510-30 | Procedures for Appeal Meetings

An appeal meeting under Bylaw #4 Appeals will normally be convened by the Chairperson of the Board, and will follow these procedures: 

 

1.Welcome and Introductions 

2.The Chairperson will state the purpose of the meeting: to hear an appeal under Bylaw # 4 

3.The Board will receive the report prepared by the Superintendent pursuant to Bylaw #4

4.Parent or spokesperson will be invited to make a written or oral submission

5.The employee whose decision is under appeal will be invited to make a written or oral submission.

6.The Board may receive any other information which, in the opinion of the Board, may be of assistance to the Board in disposing of the appeal

7.Trustees may ask questions of any person appearing at the appeal hearing

8.Parents and staff are excused from the meeting 

9.Board deliberations and decision

 

The decision of the appeal committee will communicated to the appellant by letter as soon as possible. 


1530-10 | Dress Regulations

All students shall conform to reasonable standards of appropriateness, hygiene and safety in dress and grooming.  Clothing is not appropriate if it becomes an unduly distracting factor in the learning situation.  School Principals are given authority to require any student not conforming to return home and change to suitable clothing before being re-admitted to class. 

The choice of clothing and accessories worn by a student is to be regarded as a prerogative of the individual and his or her parents, provided that the following criteria are met: 

  1. Clothing should be clean and in good repair and meet requirements of good hygiene and safety. Loose clothing, jewellery, and long loose hair must not be tolerated in classes where machinery is used or in classes such as Foods or Science when an open flame may be in use. 
  2. Clothing should be appropriate for the activities to be undertaken by the class, such as field trips,  gym classes or activity centres such as those found in primary classrooms.  Gym strip and running shoes are expected to be worn for physical education classes.  Shoes which may damage floors are not to be permitted. 

In accordance with these guidelines, the suitability of dress is a matter of judgement on the part of the Principal and staff.  Dress is a very personal matter.  If instances arise where the criteria are not being met, and action is deemed necessary, then it is expected that care will be taken to avoid offending the sensibilities of students or parents. 

This implies that references to the dress of an individual will not be made in the presence of other students.  Any discussions are to be held privately with the student or by direct contact with the parents.  Particularly when a question of taste may be involved or when dress may be deemed to be a distracting factor in the learning situation, tact and quiet diplomacy are to be utilized in preference to confrontation and coercion. 


1540-10 | Questioning of Students by Police in Schools

Except as indicated in the Regulation, Prince Rupert School District No. 52 believes that students are not to be interviewed by police officers on school premises. 

  1. If school students are interviewed by a police officer at school, it is essential that either a parent or a guardian be present at the interview. Teachers should not participate in these interviews. 
     
  2. In the case of a situation where a police officer insists on interviewing a student immediately and on school premises, any member of the Board's staff should request the police officer to delay the interview until such time as the school can obtain the presence of a parent or guardian. 
     
  3. If the request as described in clause 2 is denied, than the Administrative Officer should attend the interview and: 
    a) Ensure that the student understands that he/she has the right to remain silent. 
    b) Ensure that the student's parents are contacted immediately. 
    c) Notify the Superintendent of Schools or the Secretary-Treasurer of the happenings, who will in turn consult the Board's solicitor immediately for advice. 

1610 | Field Trip Policy

RATIONALE/PURPOSE

Well-planned and properly supervised field trips provide educational and cultural value for students.  For the purpose of this policy and the accompanying regulations, a field trip is any supervised teacher or school-sponsored activity where students leave the school premises for part of a day, a day, or multiple days.  Field trips should be selected, planned, organized, and conducted in the context of clear educational benefits and student safety.

 

POLICY
The Board of Education supports well-planned and properly supervised field trips that are of educational and cultural value for students.  The safety of students and the educational and cultural value of the field trips shall be the primary considerations when planning and approving such trips.

 

Related Policies and Regulations
1610-10         Field Trip Approval and Permissions Regulation

1610-11         Field Trip Transportation Regulation

1610-12         Field Trip Supervision Regulation

1610-13         Field Trip Risk Management Regulation

1610-14         Field Trip – Unescorted Travel Regulation

1610-15         Field Trip Budget Regulation

1610-20A      Field Trip Approval Application Form

1610-30A      Field Trip Consent Form

1610-35A      Field Trip Information Form

1610-40A      High Risk Consent Form


1610-10 | Field Trip Approval and Permissions

Student trips of significant educational value are encouraged and student trips of recreational value are permitted subject to the rules established in this regulation.  Student safety is a primary consideration.

Students participating in field trips will behave in accordance with the school code of conduct and any special directions required to ensure student safety during the trip.

A curricular (educational) field trip relates specifically to a particular course or school program, and should generally be intended for all students in a class or program.  Planning for a curricular field trip should endeavour to enable all students in the class to participate in the field trip.

The following table provides a brief summary of the categories of field trips that may be approved:

 

Category

Duration

Location

Activity (examples)

Approval

Low Risk

Up to One Day

Prince Rupert/ Port Edward *

Museum; swimming pool; ice rink; Lester Centre

Principal

Medium Risk

One Day or Overnight

Within B.C.

Outdoor skating or swimming; skiing; play days; band trip; sports tournaments

Superintendent

High Risk

One Day or Overnight

Any Location

Wilderness activities, e.g. backpacking; kayaking

Superintendent

Overnight

Out of Province (including international)

Tours, tournaments

Board of Education

* For Hartley Bay school, in the Hartley Bay area.

 

Low Risk Activities

a)  Low risk field trips will have the following characteristics:

  • One day or less in duration (i.e. not overnight).
  • Take place within the Prince Rupert to Port Edward area (or, for the Hartley Bay school, within the Hartley Bay area).
  • Provide for educational visits to local institutions for activities that do not fall within the medium or high risk definitions

b)  Form 1610-20, Field Trip Approval Application Form, must be submitted by the teacher to the principal for approval a minimum of five (5) school days before the planned trip.  The principal will send a scanned copy of all approved forms to the Superintendent for information purposes.

c)  Approval from the Principal is required.  The principal will send a scanned copy of all approved forms to the Superintendent for information purpo

d)  Procedures– the teacher shall:

  1. Obtain copies of Form 1610-30, Field Trip Consent Form, signed by a parent/guardian for each student participating in the field trip.
  2. If parent/guardian approval has been obtained for all low risk field trips, Form 1610-35, Field Trip Information Form, should be provided to parents in advance of each individual field trip.
  3. With the principal, make alternate arrangements for any student who has not provided a signed permission form for the field trip.
  4. Take on the field trip a copy of the form for each student.
  5. Consider having male and female supervisors on co-ed field trips; this may involve the use of parent volunteers (see Regulation 5310-10, Volunteers In School).

 

 

Medium Risk Activities

a)  Medium risk field trips will have the following characteristics:

  • One day or longer in duration.
  • Take place within the Province of British Columbia.
  • Provide for educational or extra-curricular trips for activities that do not fall within the high risk definitions.

b)  Form 1610-20, Field Trip Approval Application Form, must be submitted by the teacher to the principal and the Superintendent for approval a minimum of ten (10) school days before the planned trip.

c)  Approval from the Superintendent is required.
d)  For an extra-curricular sports team with a schedule of play days in other communities, it is expected that approval will be asked for all of the scheduled games at the commencement of the season.
e)  Commercial transportation is recommended during winter driving months (October to April).
f)  Procedures– the teacher shall:

  1. Obtain copies of Form 1610-40, High Risk Activity Consent Form, signed by a parent/guardian for each student participating in the field trip; if the teacher believes Form 1610-30, Field Trip / Extracurricular Trip Consent Form is sufficient for the risks associated with the proposed field trip, the teacher can request use of this form on Form 1610-20, Field Trip Approval Application Form.
  2. If parent/guardian approval has been obtained for all of the scheduled games for an extra-curricular sports team, Form 1610-35, Field Trip Information Form, should be provided to parents in advance of each individual game.
  3. With the principal, make alternate arrangements for any student who has not provided a signed permission form for the field trip.
  4. Take on the field trip a copy of the form for each student.
  5. Consider having male and female supervisors on co-ed field trips; this may involve the use of parent volunteers (see Regulation 5310-10, Volunteers in Schools).

 

High Risk – Wilderness Activities

a)  High risk field trips – wilderness activities – will have the following characteristics:

  • One day or longer in duration.
  • Normally take place within the Province of British Columbia.
  • Provide for educational trips for wilderness activities with a high degree of risk, such as backpacking, rock climbing and kayaking.

b)  Form 1610-20, Field Trip Approval Application Form, must be submitted by the teacher to the principal and the Superintendent for approval a minimum of fifteen (15) school days before the planned trip.

 

c)  Approval from the Superintendent is required.

d)  Commercial transportation is recommended during winter driving months (October to April).

e)  Procedures– the teacher shall:

  1. Obtain copies of Form 1610-40, High Risk Activity Consent Form, signed by a parent/guardian for each student participating in the field trip.
  2. With the principal, make alternate arrangements for any student who has not provided a signed permission form for the field trip.
  3. Take on the field trip a copy of the form for each student.
  4. Consider having male and female supervisors on co-ed field trips; this may involve the use of parent volunteers (see Regulation 5310-10, Volunteers In Schools).
  5. Ensure at least one supervisor has a current first aid certificate.
  6. Ensure trip planning includes appropriate precautions for the nature of the risks inherent in the planned activity, including the use of necessary safety equipment.
  7. Ensure students have received appropriate instruction and training for the planned activity, and are aware of the risks involved in the activity.
  8. Inform parents, at a pre-trip meeting, of the specific nature of the activity, its inherent risks, precautions that will be taken, and the role of the activity in the school curriculum.

 

High Risk Activities – Out of Province Travel

a)  High risk field trips – out of Province travel – will have the following characteristics:

  • One day or longer in duration.
  • Take place outside the Province of British Columbia.
  • Provide for educational or extra-curricular trips.

b)  A sponsor teacher must not have any discussions with students, parents or the media prior to obtaining approval for the trip from the Board of Education.

c)  The plan submitted to the school administration must outline educational objectives, expected costs & funding, location, means of travel & duration of trip.

d)  If plan is approved by principal, Form 1610-20, Field Trip Approval Application Form, must be submitted by the teacher to the principal and the Superintendent for approval a minimum of four (4) months before the planned trip; if trip fundraising is expected to exceed $20,000 the form must be submitted a minimum of twelve (12) months before the planned trip. 

e)  Approval from the Board of Education is required.  Fundraising must not take place before Board of Education approval for the trip is received.

e)  Commercial transportation is required.

f)  Procedures– the teacher shall:

  1. Obtain copies of Form 1610-40, High Risk Activity Consent Form, signed by a parent/guardian for each student participating in the field trip.
  2. With the principal, make alternate arrangements for any student who has not provided a signed permission form for the field trip.
  3. Take on the field trip a copy of the form for each student.
  4. Consider having male and female supervisors on co-ed field trips; this may involve the use of parent volunteers (see Regulation 5310-10, Volunteers In Schools).
  5. Ensure at least one supervisor has a current first aid certificate.
  6. Ensure trip planning includes appropriate precautions for the nature of the risks inherent in the planned activity, including medical insurance and the need for passports.
  7. Ensure students have received appropriate instruction and training for the planned activity, and are aware of the risks involved in the activity.
  8. Inform parents, at a pre-trip meeting, of the specific nature of the activity, its inherent risks, precautions that will be taken, and the role of the activity in the school curriculum.

 

Field Trip Decision Tree

Will the field trip be outside of British Columbia?
      If Yes High Risk - Board of Education Approval
IF        
No Will the trip involve wilderness or other high-risk activities?   If Yes High-Risk - Superintendent Approval
         
No Will the Field Trip be outside of Prince Rupert / Port Edward?   If Yes Medium Risk - Superintendent Approval
         
No Will the trip include outdoor activities such as skating or swimming?   If Yes Medium - Risk - Superintendent Approval
         
No Low Risk - Principal Approval      

1610-11 | Field Trip Transportation Regulation

Low Risk (Local) Field Trips

  1. A class may walk together on a field trip when time allows and providing appropriate supervision is available, considering the age of the students.
  2. Private vehicles may be used if the vehicles are in good working order, all passengers use seat belts (and booster seats when necessary), the designed seating capacity is not exceeded and there are no more than ten people in the vehicle, including the driver.  Each volunteer driver should complete the Volunteer Driver Application Form (as per Regulation 1610-20).  Note: Minimum Third Party Liability Insurance in the amount of $2,000,000.00 is required.
  3. Transportation by commercial bus is encouraged when funds are available.

 

Medium and High Risk (Out of Town) Field Trips

  1. Commercial transportation (Bus, Train or Air) is expected.
  2. Use of alternate transportation requires approval of the Superintendent.  If the use of private vehicles is approved, the requirements for private vehicles set out in #2 for Low Risk Field Trips apply.
  3. When students travel by different means as participants in the same event and a cost to students is involved, it is expected that the travel costs will be pooled and shared equitably among the participants.  For example if some students travel using Air Miles tickets, the cost of those tickets must be included in trip costs and all students will pay the same average cost.

 

Use of Electronic Devices

Supervisors must ensure that passengers are not using electronic devices in such a way as to distract the vehicle driver.

 

Use of District Field Trip Bus

The district has a bus, licensed for 20 passengers and one driver, available for field trips.  The following conditions must be met in order for a driver to be approved for the bus:

  1. Obtain approval from the school principal.
  2. The School Board Office must be provided with copies of:
    • the driver's Class 4 (or higher) drive'’s license; and
    • a current drive'’s abstract from the Motor Vehicles Branch indicating that the driver has no driving offences.
  3. This is a diesel bus and is slightly different to operate from gasoline fueled buses, so before a driver uses the bus for the first time, they must contact either Dave Salyn or Dave Garcia for a quick run-through.

 

The procedures to book and use the district field trip bus are as follows:

  1. The principal or vice-principal will contact Helena Geske at the School Board Office to book the bus.
  2. The bus key will only be available at the School Board Office.  The bus is stored at the City Yard on Wantage Road.
  3. Each driver must complete and sign a Trip Record/Pre-Trip Inspection Report and submit the report to the School Board Office at the end of the trip.  This form can be picked up with the bus key.
  4. All bus inspection deficiencies must be reported immediately to Dave Garcia, Director of Operations.  If the bus does not pass the Pre-Trip Inspection it will not be used until the deficiencies have been corrected.
  5. No eating or drinking on the bus.  The bus must be returned clean, inside and outside, when you are finished with it.
  6. The bus must be filled with diesel fuel after each use so that it is ready for the next user.   Record the fueling information on the Trip Record/Pre-Trip Inspection Report.
  7. If the City Yard is closed when the bus is to be returned, the bus must be returned early the next morning.  If this is not possible, contact Helena Geske at the School Board Office to confirm whether the bus is booked for the next day and, if so, make arrangements with the next driver.
  8. Your club/team, etc., will be charged $25.00 per day plus the current rate per kilometer for each booking.
  9. Community User groups will be charged $50 per day, plus the current rate per kilometer for each booking.
  10. A School Bus Confirmation Form will be issued following the use of the bus.  This form will also be the invoice for the use of the bus.

 

NOTE:  The field trip bus serves as the back-up to the district's busses for students with special needs.  A booking for the field trip bus is subject to cancellation if one of the busses for students with special needs is out of service.


1610-12 | Field Trip Supervision Regulation

Teacher Responsibilities

The School Regulation, Sec. 5 (7) (g) states:

(7)        The principal of a school is responsible for administering and supervising the school including

(f)        the general conduct of students, both on school premises and during activities that are off school premises and that are organized or sponsored by the school.

 

The School Regulation, Sec. 4 (1) (b) states:

(1)        The duties of a teacher include the following:

(b)       providing such assistance as the board or principal considers necessary for the supervision of students on school premises and at school functions, whenever and wherever held

 

Therefore teachers involved in field trips are responsible under the authority of the principal for the supervision of students before, during and after regular hours, both inside and outside the school itself.

When planning a field trip a teacher will ensure that supervision is available at all times, and that assistant supervisors are competent to deal with any emergencies that may arise.  The degree of supervision necessary will depend on factors such as:

  1. the age and maturity of the students;
  2. the risks associated with the activity;
  3. the location for the field trip (for example, a trip to the museum would not need as many supervisors as a trip to the seashore).

The teacher is responsible for adequate supervision of students at all times, although the teacher may be assisted by parent volunteers and other competent adults.

Supervision arrangements will be made known to parents.

 

Water Activities

A supervisor with a lifeguarding certificate is required for any field trip taking students in or on the water.  Swimming pool lifeguards meet this requirement at a public swimming pool.  For other activities such as swimming in Diana Lake or taking students on canoeing or kayaking trips, a lifeguard must accompany students on the trip.

 

Overnight Trips

Male students will be accompanied by male supervisor(s) and female students will be accompanied by female supervisor(s) for overnight trips, unless special arrangements have been made with, and approval given by, the Superintendent.  Special arrangements will include obtaining written parental permission on a form that outlines the specific nature of supervision to be provided.

For the protection of both students and supervisors, the following rules will be used for each overnight trip that requires supervision:

  • Students shall not be given single accommodation.
  • Student access to supervisor's room shall be carefully controlled and single access prohibited (one-on-one discussions or counselling shall occur at a neutral site such as a coffee shop or hotel lobby).
  • In cases of billeting, there shall be more than one student per home.  Students and billets shall be given the contact numbers for the coaches and other chaperones.  The coach sets the curfew and monitors that curfew by calling the hosts to ensure compliance.  (No students are to be billeted in homes without a phone.)

 

High Risk Field Trips – Wilderness Activities

For high risk activities, competent instruction and supervision is mandatory.  The principal must be satisfied that the teacher will provide adequate supervision, competent instruction, and follow recognized safety procedures for the planned activities.  Competence may be established by virtue of a certificate from a governing body, such as a Canoeing Instructor's Certificate from Canoe Sport B.C., a Red Cross Small Boats Certificate, or a Canadian Canoeing Association Instructor Certificate.  In areas where certificates are not issued, competency may be recognized by the leader's peers by virtue of experience and demonstrated expertise in the activity.


1610-13 | Field Trip Risk Management Regulation

Trip Planning – Identification of Risk

Risk management begins with the initial planning for a trip.  In addition to looking at the logistics for a trip (number of students, means of transportation, length of trip) it is important to identify the risks associated with the trip.  A general categorization of trips can be found in Regulation 1610-10 Field Trip Approval and Permissions.  The expected risks associated with each proposed trip must be considered.  This risk will depend upon all of the circumstances, including:

  1. The nature and location of the activity;
  2. The number of students being supervised;
  3. Known medical risks and special needs of students expected to participate (e.g. allergies);
  4. The competency and capacity of the students, taking into account their age, training and degree of skill;
  5. The possibility that some students may act recklessly or in disregard of authority; and
  6. The risk of injury to a student.

 

 

Trip Planning – Mitigation of Risk

Once the planning for a trip is underway, consideration must turn to mitigating the risks identified.  Mitigation of risk will include consideration of:

  1. Appropriate numbers of supervisors (Volunteer supervisors must meet the requirements set out in Regulation 5310-10 Volunteers, including completion of a criminal record check);
  2. Adequate training and expertise of supervisors.  For example, a canoe outing will require supervisors with appropriate knowledge and expertise in canoeing;
  3. Availability of both female and male supervisors on co-ed trips;
  4. Availability and use of appropriate safety equipment, e.g. helmets, personal flotation devices; and
  5. Whether a supervisor with first aid training is required.

 

 

Parental Consent

Parents must provide informed consent, so it is important that the consent form provide specific identification of the risks associated with the field trip.  For high risk field trips an information meeting for parents and students is mandatory.

 

Safety & Emergency Preparedness

All supervisors on a trip must be familiar with all of the risks identified for a trip.  An emergency response plan must be in place which will include items such as:

  1. Access to student emergency response kits and knowing how to use them;
  2. Copies of all consent forms to be brought by the teacher;
  3. Access to an appropriate first aid kit;
  4. Chain of notification in the event of an emergency, including the Principal, the Superintendent and parents; and
  5. An emergency communication device if the field trip will be in a remote area;

 

REFERENCES

  • Policy 1410 – District Code of Conduct Policy
  • Policy 1610 – Field Trip Policy
  • Regulation 1610 – Field Trip Approval and Permissions Regulation
  • Regulation 1611 – Field Trip Transportation Regulation
  • Regulation 1612 – Field Trip Supervision Regulation
  • Regulation 1614 – Field Trip – Unescorted Travel –  Regulation
  • Regulation 1615– Field Trip Budget Regulation
  • Form 1610-20 – Field Trip Approval Application Form
  • Form 1610-30 – Field Trip / Extracurricular Trip Consent Form
  • Form 1610-35 - Field Trip / Extracurricular Trip Information Form
  • Form 1610-40 – High Risk Activity Consent Form
  • Regulation 5310 – Volunteers Regulation

1610-14 | Field Trip - Unescorted Travel Regulation

Under special circumstances students may travel unescorted.  In these cases the Superintendent's approval and signed consent forms from the student's parents/guardians are required.


1610-15 | Field Trip - Budget Regulation

Funds may be assessed against participants or contributed by school organizations for voluntary sports, music and other field trips.

Budgeted Funding of Curricular Field Trips
In recognition of the value of well-planned curricular field trips, funds are budgeted for each school in Prince Rupert and Port Edward to share the transportation and other costs of curricular trips organized in accordance with the Board policies and regulations.

Particulars of field trips during school hours involving a cost to students are to be submitted to the Superintendent of Schools for consideration sufficiently in advance of the event to allow for reference to the Board if deemed necessary.

Budgeted Funding of Extracurricular Field Trips
In recognition of the value of well-planned extracurricular field trips, funds are budgeted for each school in Prince Rupert and Port Edward to share the transportation and other costs of extracurricular trips organized in accordance with the Board policies and regulations.  These funds will normally be used to support students participating in drama, music and sports activities.

For senior groups and teams which qualify for provincial or national competitions, the Board will contribute up to 20% of the travel, meal and accommodation cost, subject to the availability of funds budgeted for this purpose.

 

REFERENCES

1410 - - District Code of Conduct Policy 
1610 - - Field Trip Policy 
1610-10 - - Field Trip Approval and Permissions 
1610-11 - - Field Trip Transportation Regulation 
1610-12 - - Field Trip Supervision Regulation 
1610-13 - - Field Trip Risk Management Regulation 
5310-10 - - Volunteers in Schools 
1610-20A - - Field Trip Approval - Application Form 
1610-30A - - Field Trip -  Consent Form 
1610-35A - - Field Trip - Information Form 
1610-40A - - Field Trip - High Risk Consent Form 


1610-20A | Field Trip Approval - Application Form

Reference Title View

1610-20A

Field Trip Approval - Application Form

view »

1610-30A | Field Trip -  Consent Form

Reference Title View

1610-30A

Field Trip - Consent Form

view »

1610-35A | Field Trip - Information Form

Reference Title View

Field Trip - Information Form

view »

1610-40A | Field Trip - High Risk Consent Form

Reference Title View

Field Trip - High Risk Consent Form

view »

1610-50 | Travel Costs for School Events

  1. Funds may be assessed against participants or contributed by school organizations for voluntary sports, music and field trips in accordance with other policies of the Board.
     
  2. Particulars of field trips during school hours involving a cost to students are to be submitted to the Superintendent of Schools for consideration sufficiently in advance of the event to allow for reference to the Board if deemed necessary.

1710 | Student Fees and Deposits Policy

RATIONALE/PURPOSE
The School Act, Section 82 (1) and Ministerial Order M236/07 state that the Board of Education must provide free of charge to every student of school age resident in BC and enrolled in an educational program in a school operated by the Board or registered with the Board under Section 13,

a)    instruction in an educational program sufficient to meet the general requirements for graduation,

b)    instruction in an educational program after the student has met the general requirements for graduation, and

c)    educational resource materials necessary to participate in the educational program.

Subject to the School Act Section 82 and Ministerial Orders M236/07 and M140/89, the Board may charge fees and/or deposits for goods and services provided by the Board.


POLICY
In accordance with the School Act and Ministerial Orders, the Board supports the right of every student enrolled in the school district or registered under Section 13 of the School Act to receive an educational program free of charge.

The Board may require a fee or deposit in specific circumstances, as allowed by the School Act.  The Board will publish a schedule of fees and deposits each year. This schedule will be available to students and parents/guardians before the beginning of the school year.
 

REFERENCES
BC School Act, Sections 82, 82.1, 82.2, 82.3, 82.31, 82.4, 83
Ministerial Order 236/07, Board of Education Fees Order
Ministerial Order 140/89 Amended by M201/11, Provincial Fees Order

Related Policy and Regulations

1710-10 Student Fees and Deposits Regulation


1710-10 | Student Fees and Deposits Regulation

Fees

Fees may be charged where students choose options above and beyond course requirements and where the student materially benefits from that choice. Fees may also be assessed for activities, resources and usage of facilities that are not directly related to student education.

Fees will not be charged for one-use workbooks or laboratory activities (e.g. shops, science, home economics, art).

Students may be expected to purchase materials that are for projects they choose and keep after the course is completed.

Deposits

Deposits may be charged for learning resource materials to a maximum of $10.00 per item for a total maximum of $50.00. Home schooled students accessing library and textbook learning resource materials may also be charged a deposit of $10.00 per item for a total maximum of $50.00.

Approval

All fees and deposits will normally be presented to the School Board for approval by May 15 prior to the school year that they apply to.

Student Supplies

Students are expected to attend classes with appropriate personal resources, such as gym strip, writing materials, etc. Notebooks, agenda books, duo tangs, loose-leaf paper, computer paper, computer disks, pencils, crayons, pencil crayons, erasers, rulers and math sets are common examples of student supplies which parents have the responsibility of purchasing.

Schools may collect money from parents for the bulk purchasing of such supplies to achieve cost effectiveness as well as standardization of materials for student use. This practice is not considered to be a student fee. Parents will be informed that they have the option of buying their own student supplies if they do not wish to participate in a bulk purchase plan.

Money may be collected for kindergarten snacks in schools and this is not considered to be a fee.

 

REFERENCE:

Policy 1710 – Student Fees and Deposits 


2 | Vehicles Bylaw

WHEREAS

a)         It has been in recent years and still is today in the public interest to permit and encourage use of school lands, buildings and facilities for other than strictly scholastic activities when said lands, buildings and facilities are available;

b)         Persons other than students, staff, parents, guardians and employees of the Board have occasion from time to time to make use of said lands, buildings and facilities and are welcome to do so;

c)         It has been felt necessary by the Board to define the permissible limits within which students, parents, guardians and employees of the Board and all other persons making use of said lands, buildings and facilities may operate.

 

NOW THEREFORE THIS BYLAW PROVIDES AS FOLLOWS:

  1. No person shall drive, operate or ride any motorized vehicle on or over any land owned or administered by the Board of School Trustees of School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert), hereinafter called "The Board", except:

Deliveries

a)         Persons proceeding to or from a public school on a roadway provided for that purpose in the course of delivering or receiving chattels in connection with the operation of the said school;

Board Employees

b)    Persons proceeding to or from a public school on a roadway provided for that purpose in connection with their duties therein, or on other bona fide business pertaining to the operation of the said school;

Students

c)         Persons proceeding to or from a public school on a roadway provided for that purpose, and who are students registered at that school;

Board Consent

d)         Parents, guardians, employees of the Board or such other persons proceeding to or from a public school on a roadway provided for that purpose, who have first received permission from the Board, either deemed or expressed.

 

2.         No person shall:

Speed Limit

a)         Operate any motorized vehicle on or over any land owned or administered by the Board at a rate of speed greater than sixteen (16) kilometres per hour;

Parking

b)         Park, or otherwise leave unattended, a motor vehicle upon land owned or     administered by the Board in any area other than those set aside for parking by the Board, unless written permission has been received.

 

3.         Trespassing

a)         No person, other than bona fide students registered at a school, parents or guardians or such students and employees of the Board, shall enter upon any land owned or administered by the Board save with prior permission from the Board.

b)         No person, having been requested by a school Administrative Officer or other person in authority shall refuse to leave any land owned or administered by the Board;

c)         No person shall trespass, cross over or loiter upon any land owned or administered by the Board between the hours of one-half hour after sunset and one-half hour before sunrise, save with prior permission from the Board;

d)         No person shall cause, suffer or permit any domestic or range animal to enter upon land owned or administered by the Board, notwithstanding in open range areas the Provincial statutes governing Range Animal Control shall apply.

 

4.         Responsibility of Registered Owner

The owner of a motor vehicle shall be held responsible for any violation of this Bylaw by a person entrusted by the owner with the possession of the said motor vehicle.  The burden of proving that the person so in possession of the motor vehicle was not a person entrusted by the owner with the possession of the said motor vehicle shall be on the said owner.

 

5.         Penalty

Any person contravening or committing any breach of or committing any offence
against this Bylaw or any of the provisions of this Bylaw or who fails, refuses, omits
or neglects to fulfil, observe, carry out or perform any duty, obligation, matter or thing whatsoever by this Bylaw prescribed or imposed or required to be done, is liable, on summary conviction, to such penalties as are prescribed by the Summary Convictions Act.

 

6.         Authority to Make Regulations

The Board may by regulation provide for the erection of traffic control devices to regulate, prohibit, control and direct vehicular and pedestrian traffic on land owned or administered by the Board, and the erection of any such traffic control device shall be deemed prime facie evidence that such device was erected at the direction and with the authority of the Board.

 

7.         Date of Resolution    

This Bylaw shall come into force and take effect forthwith.


2110 | Staff Recruitment & Hiring Policy

POLICY 

The Board believes that the quality of the educational environment is dependent on the staff it recruits and hires. Consequently, the Board will work to attract and retain personnel with suitable credentials and skills to provide high quality instruction and student support. 

The Board subscribes to the provisions and principles of the British Columbia Labour Relations Code, the Employment Standards Act (British Columbia), and the Human Rights Code of British Columbia. The Board commits to maintaining an employment environment that is free from discrimination against any potential employee. 

Recruitment and hiring procedures for positions represented by a union will follow practices for posting and filling positions in accordance with the collective agreement. 

REFERENCES 

Related Policy and Regulations

2110-10 - -  Training to Fill Vacancies
2110-20 - - Advertising Vacant Positions 
2110-30 - - Interview Expenses 
2110-40 - - Employee Reference Check 


2110-10 | Training to Fill Vacancies

Preamble: 

From time to time, the Board experiences difficulties in filling positions vital to the operation of the District. Often these positions require specific educational credentials, including specialized certificates or degrees.  When after failing to fill one of these positions through regular processes (advertising locally, provincially and nationally), the District will consider providing incentives to candidates considered to have the potential necessary to successfully fill one of these positions through training and/or education. 

Persons currently employed by the District will be informed of the District’s intention to offer incentives for specific positions so that potential candidates are able to express their interest to the board office. All interested candidates will be considered using the following criteria 

Criteria for considering potential candidates:

  • Must have demonstrated a strong aptitude for the position. 
  • Must have relevant educational background (including prerequisites). 
  • Must be able to complete necessary educational requirements within three years. 

Final decision regarding the suitability of candidates will be with the Board. 

Subject to the provisions of a collective agreement, the following may be included as incentives:

  • Educational leave. 
  • Financial assistance through a loan. 
  • Continuation of benefits during the educational leave. 
  • Relocation assistance. 

Return of Service: 

Candidates will be expected to return to the District for up to five years following successful completion of the educational program.  The Board will forgive a portion of the loan or relocation assistance allowance on a prorated basis over the agreed upon period to a maximum of $5000 per year. 

Related Policy and Regulations

 2110 - Staff Recruitment and Hiring Policy 


2110-20 | Advertising Vacant Positions

  1. Administrative Positions: 

          a) When school is in session the position may be posted in each school. 

          b) The position may be advertised provincially by newspaper or circular. 

          c) When school is not in session the position will be advertised as deemed appropriate. 
 

  1. Non-Teaching Personnel: 

          a) All non-teaching positions will be posted in the district and will be advertised as deemed appropriate
              unless the position is filled according to a collective agreement. 

          b) Difficult to fill positions may be advertised during the posting process required in the
              collective agreement.

 

Related Policy and Regulations

2110 - Staff Recruitment and Hiring Policy 


2110-30 | Interview Expenses

The Board will reimburse administrative applicants brought in to be interviewed for appointment to the staff of the district for actual travelling and accommodation expenses incurred, at rates not exceeding those applicable to members of the Board's own staff. Expenses for incidentals are not reimbursable. 
 

Related Policy and Regulations

2110 - Staff Recruitment and Hiring Policy 


2110-40 | Employee Reference Check

Individuals who work with or have access to children must have appropriate qualifications and a fit character.  The purpose of this is to provide children with a safe environment in which to learn.  In support of this objective, staff charged with the hiring of employees conduct reference checks with previous employers, supervisors, instructors or other sources relevant to the proposed employment.  When these reference checks are being made, the following question shall be asked and a record kept of the response.

 

"Do you know of any reason why this individual should NOT be employed in a capacity where they are in contact with children

  1. Yes / No 

    If the answer is yes, an explanation is asked for. 

     


2120-10 | Orientation of New Teachers

The district will schedule orientation meetings by district staff for newly appointed teachers prior to school opening in September or early in the school year.

The purpose of the orientation meetings will be to assist new teachers to become acquainted with the educational services of the district, the policies and procedures of the district and the schools in which they are assigned, and the community in which they will be teaching.


2130-10 | Non-Certified Replacement Teachers

In order to provide a continuous, well-directed educational program for students, the district may hire the best available non-certified replacement teachers in the absence or shortage of certified Teachers Teaching-on-Call.

Non-certified replacement teachers shall be paid a daily rate as set out below, which includes 4% vacation pay, and which will be pro-rated for assignments of less than a full day. This rate of pay shall be reviewed from time to time.

Non-certified replacement teachers must complete a district training program and are expected to conduct themselves in a professional manner, observing confidentiality in matters concerning students, other District staff, and schools.

Effective Date

Daily Rate

   March 1, 2015

    $165

   February 1, 2017

    $167

   September 1, 2017

    $169


2220-10 | Evaluation of School Administrators

The Board is committed to the principle of accountability in the operation of schools under its jurisdiction. This accountability involves responsibility for the quality of educational leadership and management in District schools. 

The evaluation of school administrators is the responsibility of the Superintendent of Schools and will be carried out under his supervision. 

Evaluation is a normal and important step in a Supervisory Cycle established for school administrators. The purpose of evaluation is to improve and maintain the quality of service by assuring accountability for School-based Administrators. Furthermore, it is the goal of this process in School District 52 to support the continuous professional growth and development of these individuals in each of the schools that comprise School District 52 (Prince Rupert). 

This is accomplished over the course of a two-year professional evaluation cycle for new administrators or a five-year cycle for veteran administrators. 

The evaluation involves a process of professional reflection, self-evaluation, and the provision of meaningful feedback through the compilation of relevant, supporting data and documents. Thus, the responsibility for evaluation is shared between each of the School-based Administrators and the Superintendent of Schools. 

The professional appraisal process is guided by the Vision, Mission, and Principles of School District 52 (Prince Rupert). 

The School-based Administrators Evaluation system includes the following components: 

  1. performance standards and indicators for each area of professional responsibility; 
     
  2. a system of data collection that involves multiple sources; and 
     
  3. a procedure for conducting performance reviews that emphasizes accountability, promotes professional growth, and involves the School-based Administrators as full partners in the evaluation process. 

 

Areas of Professional Responsibility 

The areas of professional responsibility provide the framework for evaluating the work of School-based Administrators. The eight areas of responsibility include: 

  1. Caring and Respectful Schools: Insists upon a school environment that is open and welcoming, culturally affirming, and equitable. 
     
  2. Responsive Curriculum and Instruction: Promotes and models instructional diversity through adaptive and personalized programming. 
     
  3. Assessment for Learning: Promotes assessment for learning through multiple strategies and the use of assessment to enhance both instruction and achievement. 
     
  4. Adaptive Leadership: Demonstrates a commitment to shared leadership and collaboration through a learning community orientation. 
     
  5. Authentic Partnerships: Communicates effectively and engages with youth, parents, and community to involve them in the life of the school. 
     
  6. Comprehensive Prevention and Early Intervention: Seeks preventative programming, early intervention, and timely interventions and supports for students. 
     
  7. Professionalism: Demonstrates a commitment to professional ethics and growth in the context of the Vision, Mission, and Principles of School District 52. 
     
  8. School Resource Management: Plans and organizes for the effective use of resources to support school goals.

2230-10 | Evaluation of Employees Not Covered by a Collective Agreement

The Board believes that regular evaluation of all employees not covered by a Collective Agreement should take place. This will promote improvement in administrative functions, recognize exceptional performance, and ultimately result in continued improvement in the teaching-learning process in the school district. 

Therefore, in compliance with Section 15.(2) of the School Act, evaluation of employees not covered by a Collective Agreement shall take place. In support of this: 

  1. The frequency of evaluation will be at least once during a term appointment. If the appointment is continuing, an evaluation will be completed within the first twelve months of employment and every three years thereafter. 
     
  2. The Superintendent shall be responsible for implementing evaluations for all teacher certified staff not covered by a Collective Agreement and may set Regulations in regards to this. 

    The Superintendent shall be responsible for evaluating the Secretary-Treasurer with the involvement of the Board of School Trustees. 

    The Secretary-Treasurer shall be responsible for implementing evaluations for all non-teaching staff not covered by a Collective Agreement and may set Regulations in regards to this. 

  3. A professional development plan shall be created by the evaluator and employee, that includes goals and strategies where areas for improvement have been identified. 

2310 | Protection of Students and Maintenance of Order Policy

In accordance with School Act Section 177, the Board of Education authorizes principals, teachers, secretaries, and custodians in its employ to make directions and to follow such courses of action as deemed appropriate for the protection of students and maintenance of order.

The order of authority under this authorization is as follows:

  1. School principal, and in the event of absence,
  2. Designate, and in the event of absence,
  3. Teacher, and in the event of absence,
  4. Secretary, and in the event of absence,
  5. Custodian.

 

School Act, Section 177 states:

  1. A person must not disturb or interrupt the proceedings of a school or an official school function.
  2. A person who is directed to leave the land or premises of a school by a principal, vice principal, director of instruction or a person authorized by the board to make that direction
    1. Must immediately leave the land and premises, and
    2. Must not enter on the land and premises again except with prior approval from the principal, vice principal, director of instruction or a person who is authorized by the board to give that approval.
  3. A person who contravenes subsection (1) or (2) commits an offence.
  4. A principal, vice principal or director of instruction of a school or a person authorized by the board may, in order to restore order on school premises require adequate assistance from a peace officer.

 

 

References:
School Act, Section 177
2310-10 – Opening and Closing of Schools Regulation
2310-20 – Protection of Students and Maintenance of Order Regulation


2310-10 | Opening and Closing of Schools

The Principal(s) appointed to each school shall work at least one week beyond the last day of school and at least two weeks before the first day of school to ensure (a) the proper closing of the school, filing of necessary reports and the handling of inquiries from parents and students, and (b) the effective organization of their school for the ensuing year, the proper registration of students, and the handling of inquiries concerning school opening and other matters connected therewith.


2310-20 | Protection of Students and Maintenance of Order Regulation

School Activities

  1. The Principal is responsible for the manner in which the occupants use the school buildings and grounds during the school day and when school functions are held.
  2. Students must be under the supervision of a teacher at all times while in a school.

 

Curricular Field Trips and Extracurricular Activities

  1. Principals are responsible for students during all curricular field trips. 
  2. Principals are responsible for students during all extracurricular activities.  This will include appropriate supervision of students for before- and after-school activities
  3. 1610 – Field Trip Policy, and its accompanying regulations, will be followed for all curricular field trips and extracurricular activities occurring off of school property.

 

Leasing of Schools

  1. When the school premises have been leased to other parties outside of school hours, the janitorial staff on duty, under the direction of the Head Custodian are responsible. 
  2. When the school premises have been leased to other parties outside of school hours and janitorial hours, the staff member who opened and closed the building is responsible.

 

Related Policies and Regulations:

1610               Field Trip Policy
2310               Protection of Students and Maintenance of Order Policy
5220-10         Use of Schools, Grounds and Equipment Regulation


2320-10 | Communicable Disease

The School Board is responsible under Section 110 of the School Act for protecting students’ health from being endangered by teachers and other employees. The School Board will base its decision upon the advice of the Medical Health Officer and deal with each situation in accordance with this regulation. 

The Medical Health Officer will treat each case of a serious communicable disease (such as HIV infection) as an occupational health matter. That is, employees will continue to carry out their duties until and unless the condition becomes such that the employee can no longer function properly, at which time the case will be brought to the attention of the Board, and the employee removed, at least temporarily, from regular duties. This shall be done on the advice of the Medical Health Officer. Therefore, the Board and its officials most likely will not be advised until such time as the employee's health status required him/her to be off work. 

In circumstances where a school or district official becomes aware that an employee has a serious communicable disease or is a carrier, that person has the responsibility of informing the Medical Health Officer. 

Where employees must be removed from the work environment, the normal procedures for dealing with sick leave can be used. Where prolonged or continued absence occurs, Section 110 of the School Act contains provisions for dealing with situations where the health of an employee may endanger the health of students. 


2320-20 | Strenuous Physical Activity

Physical education instructors and coaches at the Secondary School level (grades 8-12) are to be qualified and re-certified in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). This certificate will conform with the standards set by the Canadian Red Cross Society, St. John's Ambulance or the Worker's Compensation Board. 

This is in recognition of the potential health risk to a very small number of students when they engage in strenuous physical exercise during a physical education class. 

Elementary physical education instructors and regular classroom teachers who also teach physical education classes are to be encouraged to obtain this certification. Two members of every school staff shall have CPR training. 


2330 | Service Awards

Recognizing that continuity of service of the teaching and non-teaching staff is a valuable asset to the community the following Policy shall be adopted. 

The Board will provide service awards as follows:

Employees

5 years service:                     Lapel pin with School District logo.

15 years service:                   A Certificate of Service, plus a gift to the value of $150

25 years service:                   A Certificate of Service, plus a gift to the value of $300

Retirement:                          A Certificate of Service, plus a $50 dining gift certificate

 

Board Members:

A trustee leaving the Board upon successful completion of at least one full term: an engraved plaque with the School District logo and the years of service.

An Honours and Awards event will be held annually for all employees to honour those employees with 5, 15 and 25 years of service as well as those retiring from the district.  The event will normally be held during the month of June.


2340 | Release Time of Staff to Act as Resource Personnel Policy

POLICY

The Board approves the release for limited periods of time with no cost to the Board, except of salary and benefits, of school or district personnel who, because of some special competence, are requested to act as speakers or consultants at educational conventions or conferences.

For such purposes, the Superintendent is authorized to approve limited absences which, in the view of the Superintendent, will not interfere seriously with the duties of the person involved.

 

Related Policy and Regulations:
2340-10 Non-Instructions Released Time


2340-10 | Non-Instructional Released Time

Non-instructional days in schools should be for topics that achieve specific objectives. These objectives should be known well in advance so that appropriate planning, sharing of topics, and student/family planning can take place. For these reasons non instructional days will be applied for as set out in Regulation 5.1.9.1 and approval obtained from the Board. 

Requests for approval of non-instructional released time are to be submitted to the Superintendent of Schools on Exhibit 5.1.9.1.1. Requests should be submitted in time to allow for referral to the Board at either the 2nd Board meeting in September, or the 1st Board meeting in January. The Superintendent may approve any change in days scheduled for reasonable reasons. Changes in the objectives should be returned to the Board for approval. Parents should be informed of approved Non Instructional Days prior to October 1 and January 15. 


2340-30 | Lost Time Due to Transportation Difficulties

When staff experience delay when returning to work due to severe weather and/or transportation difficulties beyond their control, leave may be granted with pay at the discretion of the Superintendent. 


2350-10 | Early Retirement Incentive Plan

The purpose of the Early Retirement Incentive Plan (ERIP) shall be: 
 a) To provide a financial incentive for members of the teaching profession to retire between the ages of 55 and 64. 
 b) To provide more teaching opportunities. 
 c) To reduce the number of teachers or staff during times of financial restraint. 

The purpose of the Early Retirement Incentive Plan (ERIP) shall be:

  1. To provide a financial incentive for members of the teaching profession to retire between the ages of 55 and 64.
  2. To provide more teaching opportunities.
  3. To reduce the number of teachers or staff during times of financial restraint.

The Board may pay a retiring allowance to teachers who retire before reaching age 65, subject to the following conditions:

The teacher must:

  1. be on a continuing appointment
  2. be age 55 or over
  3. be on the maximum step of the salary scale
  4. retire.

The allowance will be paid in one sum on the date of retirement and will be based on scale salary without allowance in the following amounts: 

Full years to compulsory retirement  Pay-out 
1 20% of annual salary
2 25% of annual salary
3 30% of annual salary
4 35% of annual salary
5 40% of annual salary

 

It is possible that this payment may be treated as a retiring allowance for tax purposes and that the tax may be deferred on this payment by the purchase of an income averaging annuity contract or by paying the amount directly into a registered retirement savings plan. Further information should be obtained from the District Taxation Office.

Procedures:

  1. An application for an Early Retirement Incentive and a commitment to retire at the end of the school year must be given to the Board, in writing, by March 31 each year.
  2. Incentive payment is based on scale salary without allowances. For example, teachers receiving an allowance because they hold a position of special responsibility, such as a Department Head or a school Administrative Assistant, will receive a payment based solely on their position on the teachers' salary scale.
  3. Any continuing part time teachers who qualify will be paid the gratuity on a pro-rated basis.
  4. The Board reserves the right to restrict the number of applicants granted the ERIP in one year.
  5. Where the number of applicants is restricted, the criteria shall be the number of continuous years service to the district.
  6. If a teacher is eligible for and receives an early retirement incentive from the Ministry of Education, he or she will not be eligible for a retirement incentive from the School District.
  7. If a teacher receives a retirement incentive from the District, the individual must retire from the teaching force and cannot be considered for teacher teaching on call or other teaching assignments in the District for at least one year after retirement.

Note: Please refer to section B.1.16 of the teacher collective agreement.


2350-20 | Retirement Age of Non-Teaching Staff

All non-teaching staff, must retire when they reach the maximum retirement age as defined in the Municipal Superannuation Act. 

(See Article IX Section 1 of the International Union of Operating Engineers Agreement - Local 882B.) 


2360 | Employee Conduct and Political Activities Policy

The School Act requires a non-sectarian approach to the conduct of education in British Columbia schools.  Therefore, the study of political or religious issues in classrooms shall be of an objective and comparative nature, and related to the provincial curriculum.

The Board will not allow any activities or distribution of materials in its schools during instructional hours which are political or religious in nature and which proselytize.  The Board delegates to the Superintendent the authority to make and implement regulations with respect to activities that may be pursued and materials that may be distributed.

 

Principles for Employee Conduct include the following:

Loyalty: All employees have a duty of loyalty to the school district as their employer.  The duty of loyalty requires employees, irrespective of political preferences or affiliations, to serve the school district to the best of their ability.  Employees must, in the conduct of their duties, instill confidence and trust, and must not impugn the reputation of the school district.

Public Comment: School district employees are free to comment on public issues but must exercise caution to ensure that, by doing so, they do not jeopardize the perception of impartiality in the performance of their duties.  For this reason, care should be taken in making comments or entering into public debate regarding school district policies.  Employees must not use their position in the school district to lend weight to the public expression of their personal opinions.

Political Activity: Employees are free to participate in political activities.  Employees (or their affiliates) must not engage in political activities during working hours.  Employees’ political activities must be clearly separated from activities related to their employment (including the use of organization resources of any kind).  Employees are required to obtain prior approval in accordance with Regulation 2360-10 before distributing union, political or religious information to students or parents.

 

 

Related Policies and Regulations:

2360-10    Employee Conduct and Political Activities

5220        Use of Schools, Grounds and Equipment Policy

5220-10    Use of Schools, Grounds and Equipment


2360-10 | Employee Conduct and Political Activities

1.0    Discussion of Political or Religious Issues in Classrooms

    1.1    Political or religious issues, as they form part of the curriculum under study in a School District classroom, shall be dealt with in accordance with the British Columbia Teachers' Association's    Code of Ethics and Regulations 1110-10 through 1110-50.

2.0    Distribution of Political or Religious Materials

    2.1    There shall be no distribution of political or religious materials for the purpose of proselytism in schools.

    2.2    Teachers are required to submit correspondence to their administrator for approval prior to sending it home to parents in order that administration is aware of what is being considered for distribution.

    2.3    Subsection 2.2 does not include homework, notes or comments in agenda books, or documents specifically for students (e.g. Birthday cards).

    2.4    Before rejecting, or requiring material changes to, any correspondence, administrators are required to consult with the Superintendent with respect to such correspondence.

3.0    Meetings of a Political or Religious Nature 

    3.1    Meetings of a partisan political or denominational religious nature may not be conducted as part of a curricular or extra-curricular activity for students.  Meetings and displays of a partisan political or denominational religious nature conducted by community groups renting a School District facility shall be confined to areas to which the students do not, under normal circumstances, have access, or from which for the duration of such activities students have been excluded.

4.0    Running for Public Office

    4.1    It is the privilege of any employee of the Board of Education to offer themself as a candidate for any public office for which they may be eligible.  They shall, however, first familiarize themself with Board regulations by consulting the Superintendent.

    4.2    In any case where, in the opinion of the Superintendent, the requirements of the public office would interfere with the carrying out of the duties of its employee, leave-of-absence must be obtained.  Subject to the requirements of any collective agreement, full-time leave-of-absence will be granted, without pay, for the duration of the term of office.  Upon application, part-time leave-of-absence may be granted where no loss to the educational program results.  Such absence will be monitored by the Superintendent.

    4.3    On expiration of the leave-of-absence, subject to the requirements of any collective agreement, the employee shall be re-engaged by the Board but not necessarily in the same position that they formerly held.  Reasonable efforts will be made to place the returning employee in their former position or in a relatively equal position for which they are qualified.


2420-10 | Department Heads and Team Leaders

Teachers may be appointed by the Superintendent of Schools to the position of Department Head or Team Leader, with an allowance in accordance with the collective agreement in effect at the time.  Each appointment shall be for a definite stated period of time.

Purpose and Responsibilities

A.  General 

  1. The position of "Department Head" or “Team Leader” exists for the prime purpose of improving student success, improving communication, and school wide planning.
  2. It is expected that the Department Head or Team Leader will attempt to achieve this purpose by:
    • Collaborating with their respective Departments or Teams regarding student learning, curriculum, assessment practices, and resources.
    • Offering professional assistance and leadership to colleagues.
    • Carrying out assigned administrative details.
  3. Department Heads and Team Leaders are directly responsible to their Principal for the proper performance of their duties.

 

B. Specific

    In addition to a normal teaching load, Department Heads and Team Leaders shall:

  1. Chair meetings of teachers, as required.
  2. Encourage both individual initiative and the sharing of ideas amongst teachers.
  3. Lead the organizing of adequate and appropriate term work in all courses taught within the Department or Team.
  4. Discuss individual class progress with teachers.
  5. Discuss assessment practices and ways to communicate student learning.
  6. Assist in examining and implementing the curricular Learning Standards, Big Ideas, and Core Competencies.
  7. Obtain suitable teaching resources for use within the Department or Team.
  8. Report to the Principal regularly regarding budgets, requisitions, and recent or upcoming department/team activities.
  9. Maintain an up-to-date inventory of supplies and equipment.
  10. Carry out such other specific duties as are requested by the Principal and Superintendent of Schools.

3 | Perpetual Trust Fund Bylaw (Charitable Donations)

A bylaw to establish a perpetual Trust Fund for the handling of financial contributions for purposes acceptable to the Board.

 

WHEREAS Revenue Canada, Taxation Department, has approved the Board’s application for “registered charity” status and

 

WHEREAS the Board may therefore issue receipts which may be used by contributors to support deductions claimed under Sub-Paragraph 110 (1) (a) (i) of the Income Tax Act and

 

WHEREAS the Ministry of Education has granted its approval to establish the Trust in accordance with Section 240(3) of the School Act,

 

NOW THEREFORE the Board of School Trustees, School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) in open meeting enacts the following:

 

THAT the Secretary-Treasurer cause to be established upon the Board’s books of accounts and in a bank as shall be declared from time to time by the Board, a separate account designated as “School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) Charitable Trust”.

 

THE SPECIFIC PURPOSE for the Trust shall be:

To provide a mechanism by which individuals and/or private corporations may contribute financially for purposes acceptable to the Board of School Trustees, School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert).

 

THE TERMS OF THE SAID TRUST shall be as follows:

1. Revenue
   (a)     Approved Programs
       (i)  On receiving a Trust contribution designated to an approved or an existing program, the Secretary Treasurer or his designate shall issue a receipt bearing the income tax registration number held by the Secretary-Treasurer.
       (ii)  The receipt shall identify the program for which the contribution has been designated.

    (b)    Unapproved Programs
        (i)   On receiving a contribution to an unapproved or non-existent program, the Secretary-Treasurer or his designate shall issue an interim receipt which does not bear the income tax registration number.
        (ii)  The contribution shall be credited to the general Suspense Account and the Secretary-Treasurer shall report the contribution to the Board at its next meeting.
        (iii)  In the event the Board approves the establishment of the program for which the funds were contributed, the Secretary-Treasurer or his designate shall then issue a receipt bearing the income tax registration number held by the Secretary-Treasurer.  The receipt shall identify the program for which the contribution is to be used.
        (iv)  In the event, however, the Board does not approve the establishment of the program for which the funds were contributed, the funds shall be returned forthwith to the contributor with the Board’s regrets.

     (c)   Allocation of Contributions
        (i) No contributor shall be permitted to specify that the contribution is to be directed towards a particular school or person.

 

2.  Disbursements
All commitments and disbursements made against the Trust shall be cleared through the Secretary-Treasurer or his designate who shall ensure the proper coding of the invoice and shall initial same.

 

3.  Auditing
All records, books and documents concerning the Trust shall be available for auditing as required by law.

 

Read a first, second and third time, finally passed and adopted the 10th day of January 1989.

     “Fred Beil”

     Board Chairman

 

      “A.Lien”

       Secretary-Treasurer


3110-10 | School Bus and Ferry Discipline

Bus Service for Students with Special Needs

  1. For students with special needs regularly riding on bus transportation provided by the Board, the authorized rules concerning safety and deportment are to be annually:
    • Discussed with students by school staff;
    • Given to bus drivers; and
    • Sent to parents for signature.
  2. Bus drivers have the authority to maintain order but shall report all cases requiring disciplinary action to the Principal of the school.
  3. Parents shall be advised by the Principal of all cases of misbehaviour reported by the bus driver.
  4. Principals, in consultation with the District Principal, Learning Services, have the authority to suspend the right to transportation for misbehaviour for up to five days. Any suspensions shall be reported to the parents, the District Principal, Learning Services and the Superintendent of Schools.
  5. Suspensions of longer than five school days may be imposed only by the Superintendent and if for a period of more than ten (10) days may be considered to have a significant effect on the education of a student. The suspended student and/or parent may appeal such a suspension under Board Bylaw #4. The Superintendent shall provide the parent with a copy of the appeal procedure outlined in Board Bylaw #4.
  6. Privilege of transportation shall be restored to suspended students only upon assurance to the Principal of conforming to authorized rules and only after the stated period of suspension has been completed.
  7. Students will be held responsible for wilful damage as outlined in School Act Section 10.

Students Travelling To and From School on Bus or Ferry Services

  1. The Principal will respond to any report of a student requiring disciplinary action.
  2. Parents shall be advised by the Principal of all cases of misbehaviour reported to the school.
  3. School Bus and Ferry Services are not provided by the Board, and as a result the Board does not have authority with respect to any decision by the bus or ferry operator to suspend transportation services.

Students Travelling on Field Trips

  1. For students riding on bus or ferry transportation for a curricular or extra-curricular field trip, the authorized rules concerning safety and deportment are to be discussed with students by school staff, prior to the trip.
  2. Bus drivers and ferry operators have the authority to maintain order.  The teacher travelling with the students will respond to any report of a student requiring disciplinary action, and follow the normal processes for the school.
  3. Particular care must be taken on long field trips that the driver is not distracted.  In particular, electronic devices can make it difficult for the driver to see the road if it is dark, and students should be told not to allow their screens to face the front of the bus.

References:

1610-11 – Field Trip Transportation Regulation


3210 | Energy Conservation and Environmental Stewardship Policy

POLICY

Responsible consumption, energy management and environmental stewardship are the joint responsibility of trustees, administrators, staff, and students.

A commitment to energy conservation and sustainability will achieve reductions in:

  • greenhouse gas emissions; and
  • the environmental impact of district operations.

The Board is committed to the continuous improvement of the district’s energy management performance and to building a culture of sustainability and environmental stewardship.

The Board encourages and supports the development and implementation of effective energy awareness activities, curriculum, training, and programs as a means to creating a district and community-wide culture of conservation.

 

Related Policies and Regulations:

3220                Buildings and Grounds Projects Policy
3210-10           Energy Conservation and Environmental Stewardship Regulation


3210-10 | Energy Conservation and Environmental Stewardship Regulation

Energy Conservation and Environmental Stewardship are guided by the following principles:

  1. Education leading to behavioral change.
  2. Integrating environmentally sound considerations into all business decisions.
  3. Life-cycle thinking in the management of school district assets.
  4. Encouraging partners, clients, and suppliers to adopt environmentally sustainable practices.
  5. Promoting in-house alternatives to hazardous materials.
  6. Investing in studies that support funding applications for facility upgrades that prevent or minimize consumption, conserve energy, and reduce waste.
  7. Implement equipment and facility upgrades where practicable.
  8. Continually measure and report the district’s sustainability performance and carbon footprint.

Completing studies and implementing upgrades are subject to the availability of funding.

 

Education

Effective energy awareness activities, curriculum, training, and programs will be developed and implemented to create a district and community-wide culture of conservation.

 

Asset Management

Maintenance and renovation projects will include energy efficiency upgrades whenever possible.  LEED Gold will be the minimum standard requested for all building construction projects.

 

Reporting

Reporting on the district’s sustainability performance and carbon footprint is achieved by complying with the requirements of the Climate Action Secretariat.  The school district’s annual Carbon Neutral Action Report will be available on the district’s website.

 

REFERENCES

3210                Energy Conservation and Environmental Stewardship Policy

3220                Buildings and Grounds Projects Policy


3220 | Buildings and Grounds Projects Policy

POLICY

The Board supports regular maintenance, renovation, and rejuvenation of buildings and grounds. These projects are to be delivered in an environmentally responsible manner and will address:

  1. Health and Safety Concerns
  2. Fire Protection, Emergency and Building Security Systems
  3. Building Envelope Systems
  4. Mechanical, Structural and Electrical Systems
  5. Classrooms and Other Interior Spaces
  6. Access ways, Parking Lots and Recreational Spaces
  7. Site Infrastructure (e.g. utility connections).

The Secretary Treasurer is responsible for maintaining facilities in an efficient and effective manner.

 

 

REFERENCES
3110               Energy Conservation and Environmental Sustainability Policy
3110-10         Energy Conservation and Environmental Sustainability Regulation


3220-10 | Buildings and Grounds Projects Regulations

1.         Each year the School District will budget funds for buildings and grounds maintenance, renovation and rejuvenation.

2.         The School District will also expend funds received from the Ministry of Education for the purpose of facility renovation and rejuvenation.

3.         Projects will be prioritized by taking into account:

  • Health & safety concerns;
  • Maintenance of roofing;
  • Maintenance of heating & ventilation systems;
  • Cost reduction initiatives, including energy savings;
  • Maintenance of exteriors;
  • Maintenance of classrooms; and
  • Any other requirements of the Capital Asset Management Framework.

4.         The Secretary Treasurer is authorized to approve projects/purchases to a maximum of $100,000.

5.         The Superintendent is authorized to approve projects/purchases to a maximum of $250,000.

6.         Projects/purchases exceeding $250,000 will be reviewed by the Finance & Building Committee prior to being submitted to the Board for approval.

7.         The Director of Operations is responsible for ensuring that facilities are maintained in an efficient and effective manner.

 

 

REFERENCE:

3220               Buildings and Grounds Projects Policy

7220-20         Tendering for Maintenance and Renovation Projects Regulation

Capital Asset Management Framework of the Ministry of Finance


3310-10 | Library Services

The Board approves the provision of adequate library services to all schools and directs that adequate library space be maintained in each new school.

"Adequate library service" exists when all of the following conditions are met:

  1. The library room is large enough to conform to the Building Manual and contains the necessary furniture, books, and other materials properly installed.
  2. Books and other materials are properly classified according to a standardized system followed in general library practice.
  3. A professional staff is in charge of the library.

The Superintendent of Schools shall prepare for the Board schedules showing the amount of time to be given to library supervision and administration.


3320-10 | School Food Services

The Board supports the following Regulation because of the increased awareness of the value of good nutrition to the development and maintenance of health, and the evidence that poor nutrition contributes to caries and disease:

a)    It is a responsibility of schools selling foods to promote especially the sale of nutritionally acceptable items and to provide education in nutrition, and thus to assist in the development of healthy eating habits.

b)    Food sold in elementary schools shall be limited to those which are both nutritious and not detrimental to the teeth.

c)    Beverage vending machines in secondary schools shall offer a wide selection of nutritional drinks along with soft drinks.


3330-10 | School Stores

That the Board of School Trustees approves of the establishment of school stores in the schools of this district.  Merchandise approved for sale in these stores shall consist of such items as school sweaters, rings, gym strip, and emergent school supplies which provide a necessary service to students.


3340-10 | Inventories of Furnishings and Equipment

Furnishings and equipment used in the district represent a significant outlay of money and as such should be controlled and accounted for by the responsible parties.

Inventory holders are to be appointed for each major area.  For example, the Administrative Officer of the school shall be the inventory holder, in other major buildings an appropriate inventory holder is to be designated.  It is expected that due care and attention will be given to the use and control of the inventory and the inventory holder will be responsible.

Inventories are to include all capital equipment valued over $100 and has a life expectancy of more than 2 years, that is purchased or donated to the district.  Multiple capital equipment less than $100 but in quantity should be counted, i.e., student desks - 100 x $75.00 = $7,500.00.  Where personal property is on loan in the buildings or on site it is to be suitably marked.  All inventory items are to bear a suitable marking number which corresponds with the inventory list.  This number is in addition to a proper description which would indicate the item, type, model, and serial number where applicable.  An updated inventory is to be prepared each year by the inventory holder by October 1st.  A copy of the inventory is to remain on the location with one copy being lodged in the office of the Secretary-Treasurer.

Losses/thefts of inventory items are to be promptly reported to the Secretary-Treasurer, with a c.c. to the Superintendent of Schools, including:

a)    description of item and circumstances of loss
b)    control measures at time of loss
c)    Regulation report
d)    recommendation for recovery of cost
e)    need for replacement.


3350 | Acceptable Use of Technology

RATIONALE

The Board of Education acknowledges the potential of technology to enhance communications and learning in schools, the school community, and the district’s working environments.  Accordingly, the Board supports the safe and appropriate use of technology, including governing the use of technology by students, staff, and trustees, parents, volunteers, and the community.

POLICY

The Board encourages acceptable, ethical, responsible and legal use of all district and personal technology by users.  Such use will be consistent with this policy and other district policies including the District Code of Conduct, school rules and codes of conduct, the School Act, and the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.

The Board acknowledges the need to protect the integrity of school and working environments and ensure the safety, security and privacy of students, staff, trustees, and other users.

The Board has designed this policy to reflect the dynamic and evolving nature of technology.  However, due to the continual change that occurs in technology, this policy and its associated regulation(s) are to be reviewed on a regular basis.

Related Policies and Regulations:

Bylaw #7        Freedom of Information/Protection of Privacy Bylaw
Policy 1410        District Code of Conduct Policy
Regulation 1410-10        District Code of Conduct
Regulation 3350-10        Acceptable Use of Technology


3350-10 | Acceptable Use of Technology

1. Overview and Definitions

1.1.    This Acceptable Use of Technology Regulation applies to all Users using School District Technology or Personal Technology that is connected with any school district or school district-related activities, including off-campus activities if such activities have a connection to the district or its schools.
1.2.    The following definitions apply within this regulation:

1.2.1.    Acceptable Use of Technology supports activities consistent with the district’s policies and regulations as well as the district’s Information Technology Plan.  Specific activities may vary slightly from school to school as determined by the building administrator or his/her designate.
1.2.2.    Cyber Bullying refers to willful and repeated harm inflicted through the medium of electronic text or digital media. 
1.2.3.    Electronic Information Resources are resources provided for the purpose of conducting business related to the mission of the district.
1.2.4.    Expectation of Privacy refers to the assumptions that a reasonable person would make about what is recorded and reviewed during their interactions using School District Technology or Personal Technology.  There are several Systems where an expectation of privacy would apply.

1.2.4.1.    Email is scanned by several automated Systems for spyware, viruses, unsolicited commercial email, and other generally accepted threats.  The logs of these automated scans are reviewed on a regular basis, and when cause for concern is raised, closer scrutiny of individual email content may occur for the performance tuning of the automated Systems.  All employees and students have a reasonable expectation to privacy for their email until such time that an investigation provides reasonable cause to retrieve and examine emails.
1.2.4.2.    Internet access is filtered by an automated System for content that is not suitable for enhancing communications and learning in schools, the school community, and the district’s working environment.  This automated System implements various identification techniques to block and accept content based upon physical location, time of day, user and group membership, and actual content.  All employees have a reasonable expectation to privacy for accessing web sites until such time that there is reasonable cause to retrieve and examine web content filter logs.  

1.2.3.    False Personation means the intentional false assumption of the name and personality of another through electronic means.  For example, setting up a false Facebook profile using someone else’s name and posting false information about that person.
1.2.4.    Harassment can cover a wide range of inappropriate behaviour.  It is commonly understood to be engaging in a course of vexatious comment or conduct this known or ought reasonably to be known to be unwelcome.  For the purposes of this Acceptable Use of Technology Policy, behaviour expectations are defined in the District Code of Conduct, relevant employee collective agreements and Board policy.
1.2.5.    Information Technology Department means the Director of Information Technology of School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) and all other employees authorized by him/her to manage Electronic Information Resources.
1.2.6.    Internet refers to an electronic communication System connecting electronic devices all over the world through which individual subscribers can interact and share information.
1.2.7.    Malware is short for "malicious software," and refers to software programs designed to damage or do other unwanted actions to Electronic Information Resources, Personal Technology or School District Technology.
1.2.8.    Network Etiquette/Netiquette is a set of social conventions that facilitate interaction over networks, including email, blogs, forums and even texting on mobile communication devices.  The importance and rules that netiquette follows vary from electronic community to electronic community, and social conventions that might be completely acceptable in one community may be completely unacceptable in another.  In general, netiquette at the district should focus on basic professionalism, an amiable work and learning environment, and to enhance communication and learning.
1.2.9.    Parent includes parents and/or legal guardians of a student.
1.2.10.    Personal Information means recorded information about an identifiable individual other than contact information and will be interpreted in a manner consistent with the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (“FOIPPA”).  All electronic information collected, accessed and disclosed will be in accordance with FOIPPA, the School Act and School District 52 Bylaw #7: Freedom of Information/Protection of Privacy.
1.2.11.    Personal Technology means any electronic device, service or System designed or used to assist in extending human potential (including but not limited to computers, mobile communication devices, cameras, social networking sites, email and voice services, school networks, etc.) owned and/or operated by a User, but excludes School District Technology.
1.2.12.    Plagiarism is defined as direct use of wording from a source without appropriate citation or quotation, direct use of ideas without attribution, and paraphrasing without citation of source material.
1.2.13.    School District Network/SD52 Net/Intranet means a privately maintained computer network that can be accessed only by authorized Users, especially employees and students of the district.
1.2.14.    School District Technology includes, but is not limited to, any equipment owned or controlled by the district to access Electronic Information Resources.  Such technology may vary from school to school and by administrative building.
1.2.15.    Synonym refers to an attempt to create an electronic or otherwise online representation of a persona by way of intentional spelling mistake that is likely to fool users. For example creating an online character by the name of John Smith with the intention of purposely attempting to represent the persona of Jon Smith.
1.2.16.    System means interrelated and/or interdependent hardware, software and data communication devices.
1.2.17.    User refers to all employees, students and third parties given access to School District Technology or School District Networks including, but not limited to, agents, appointees, consultants, contractors, persons on secondment, practicum students, student teachers, exchange teachers, exchange students, volunteers, Parents, and Parent Advisory Councils (PAC/DPAC).
 

2.    Technology and Instruction

2.1.    New technologies shift the ways that information may be accessed, communicated and transferred by members of society.  As User access to rich information resources is desirable, school environments in the district will be characterized by the incorporation of the best instructional practice through the integration of information and communication technology tools into student and professional learning.  This environment will be characterized by openness, accessibility, transparency, ethical and legal use and the personal accountability and responsibility of all Users.
 

3.    Access Authorization and User Agreements

3.1.    Access to any School District Technology or School District Networks must be authorized.  In order to obtain this authorization, the end User must indicate that they have read, understood, and acknowledged the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and Regulation along with any secondary terms or conditions imposed by a school or site.  In circumstances where a User with special needs may not be able to consent to or understand the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and Regulation, consent may be obtained from a Parent and/or a school administrator may exercise his/her discretion to permit a documented exemption.

3.2.    Internet/SD52 Net access and use is a privilege and not a right

3.2.1.    Unacceptable, inappropriate or illegal use of resources on the Internet, email or other online actions that violate the district Code of Conduct or the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy or Regulation, may result in revocation of access privileges.  The district may deny, revoke, suspend or remove any User account or access at any time based upon a reasonable determination of unacceptable use by the User.  The final decision as to whether unacceptable behaviour has occurred resides with the Superintendent or his/her designate.

3.3.    Monitoring of Internet/SD52 Net Use

3.3.1.    The district employs several technologies to proactively monitor use of the Internet to protect Users and all devices.  Part of this monitoring includes collecting information about the sites visited by individual Users.  This monitoring technology also permits granular control on sites that may be blocked or accepted at the termination point of the User’s technology (School District Technology or Personal Technology). 
3.3.2.    Employees of the district have a reasonable expectation of privacy for their access to resources on the Internet.  Routine monitoring of access to the Internet shall, if reasonably practicable and appropriate, be performed in such an anonymous fashion as performance of the overall networks may allow.  The district may actively monitor the internet use of a specific employee when there are reasonable grounds to indicate that the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy or Regulation may be, are being or have been violated.  Except as otherwise required by law, access to the logs of internet use will typically not be maintained for more than 365 days unless a review or an investigation has been initiated.  As per the British Columbia Personal Information Protection Act, acceptance of the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and Regulation indicates that the User agrees with the following:

The district may collect the following information from internet access:

  • Time and date stamp of the resource accessed;
  • The resource accessed;
  • The User account of the resource accessed (where possible); and
  • The IP address of the School District Technology or Personal Technology used to access the resource.

3.3.3.    The purpose of the collection of this data is primarily for performance monitoring and traffic shaping background information to appropriately manage School District Technology and School District Networks.  This information can and will also be used to block content on the Internet that is not appropriate for use in the public school system.  At any time, an employee may request in writing of the Superintendent or the Secretary-Treasurer a copy of all records directly attributable to their own user account.  The district agrees to provide copies of these records within 25 working days.
3.3.4.    Active monitoring of an individual User’s internet access will normally only be performed after notifying the User that this monitoring is occurring, unless such notification would compromise a school district, law enforcement or other investigation.  Active monitoring will always be specified with a definitive begin start date and time and end date and time, and will never be performed for more than 31 consecutive days.
3.3.5.    Students do not have a reasonable expectation of privacy on their access to the Internet.  The monitoring of internet use for students may be reviewed continuously, and monitoring results may be shared amongst teachers and administrators directly responsible for the education of the student.
3.3.6.    All other users not defined explicitly as students or employees have no expectation of privacy on their access to the Internet.  The school district may choose to monitor and control internet access, including sharing the monitoring information as it sees fit.

3.4.    Use of private or personal information on the School District Networks

3.4.1.    The School District may collect personal information of both students and staff to manage the district.  In all cases this collection and subsequent use of information will comply with all other district policy (including the Records Management Program Policy) and the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act.
 

4.    Roles and Responsibilities of this Acceptable Use of Technology Regulation

4.1.    Role of the District

  • The district will provide reasonable monitoring and supervision of all schools’ and administrative buildings’ Electronic Information Resources, including using School District Technology for this purpose.
  • The district, with the authority of the Superintendent or his/her designate and/or the Secretary Treasurer and/or his/her designate, may authorize the application of software or hardware that may restrict or track access of inappropriate material.
  • Only district owned software programs (including free and/or open source software and hardware) may be installed on School District Technology unless otherwise authorized in writing by the Superintendent or his/her designate.  The Information Technology Department may remove any unauthorized software from School District Technology without prior warning to the User.

4.2.    Role of the User

  • Users are expected to act in a responsible, ethical and legal manner in accordance with the accepted rules of Network Etiquette, district policy and the district and school Codes of Conduct, as well as Federal and Provincial laws;
  • Users are to endeavour to make each electronic communication truthful and accurate.  Care should be used in drafting email and other electronic communications.  Anything created or stored in an electronic System must be reviewable by others (i.e. non-reversible encryption may not be used to hide actions that would not be suitable).
  • Users are responsible for any unauthorized charges, fees, and costs, resulting from their use of Electronic Information Resources while accessing the Internet using School District Technology or Personal Technology.
  • Users are permitted access to School District Technology to assist them in the performance of their job or the fulfilment of their tasks or duties, including student/school related duties.
  • A User’s use of School District Technology shall be consistent with the mission of the district’s Information Technology Plan taking into account the varied instructional needs and learning styles/abilities of the User.
  • Use of the Internet and the School District Network by Users must be in support of educational objectives or of the effective operation of the district.
  • Users must follow the district’s authorization procedures before using School District Technology
  • The user agreement or record of acknowledgement must be signed and/or acknowledged before accessing School District Technology.  These agreements or records of acknowledgement are to be submitted to the school administrator(s) or building supervisors and made available in the school or building office(s) or, for employees, in the Board Office.
  • It is the User’s responsibility not to initiate access to unacceptable material and to cease access to such material immediately upon discovery that inadvertent access to such materials has been gained (see Section 16.1 below).
  • School District Technology generally must be used for educational reasons relating to the purpose and mission of the district.  Incidental personal use is permissible, but will be subject to the terms and conditions of this policy and regulation, other district policies and other applicable federal and provincial laws.
  • The procedure to follow when a User has identified that these rules are not being followed is to perform at least any one of the following:
  • Notify a teacher;
  • Notify a school administrator(s);
  • Notify a supervisor; or
  • Notify the Information Technology Department.

4.3.    Role of the Superintendent 
The Superintendent or his/her designate:

  • Must prioritize use and access to School District Technology.
  • Is the only person authorized to create or modify electronic identities representing the district.

4.4.    Role of the Administrator or Supervisor
The administrator or supervisor must:

  • Ensure that all employees at the school or in the building receive instruction on the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and Regulation and sign the district record of acknowledgement.
  • Verify that all students are not granted access to School District Technology until they and their Parents sign the district user agreement.
  • Maintain completed user agreements for all students at the school and forward staff user records of acknowledgement to the Board Office.
  • Establish procedures to ensure adequate supervision of students using School District Technology.
  • Ensure that information about the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and Regulation is provided to all other authorized Users at the school or building.
  • When Personal Technology is utilized within a school or building using any School District Technology, the Administrator or Supervisor may authorize such use when satisfied that district security is ensured and the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and Regulation are being followed.

4.5.    Role of Teachers, Child Care Workers and Other Support Staff
Teachers, child care workers and other support staff will work together to help students to:

  • Develop the intellectual, emotional, behavioural and civic skills necessary to understand, utilize and discriminate among information sources.
  • Identify information appropriate to their age and development levels, and to evaluate and use the information to meet their personal educational goals.
  • Respect and protect the rights of every other User in the district including other Users on the Internet.
  • Inform themselves and all persons under their direction and supervision about the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and Regulation.
  • Understand the consequences of not complying with this policy and regulation and other applicable codes of conduct and student discipline policies.

4.6.    Role of Parents
Parents must:

  • •Sign the district user agreement in addition to their children enrolled in the district.
  • Read and understand the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and Regulation.
  • Discuss Acceptable Use of Technology with their children and reinforce acceptable and responsible use of Personal Technology and School District Technology.
     

5.    Liabilities of the School District

5.1.    The district will not be responsible for any damages a User suffers including loss of data resulting from delays, non-delivery, mis-delivery, or service interruption caused by the district’s negligence or by the User’s errors or omissions.

5.2.    The district will not be responsible for any financial obligations arising from a User’s or any other person’s unauthorized use.
 

6.    No Guarantee or Warranty

6.1.    While the district will attempt to make reasonable efforts to ensure that its Electronic Information Resources, as educational resources, are used responsibly by the Users, it cannot guarantee that unauthorized or inappropriate sites will not be accessed.

6.2.    The availability of Electronic Information Resources to Users does not imply an endorsement by the district of its content nor does the district guarantee the accuracy of the information within its Electronic Information Resources.


7.    Network Safety

7.1.    Users are responsible to protect their passwords and keep them private to ensure System security.

7.2.    When a User feels that he/she can identify a security problem on the network, he/she must notify the school administrator, the System administrator and/or the Information Technology Department, and not demonstrate the problem(s) to others.

7.3.    Except as required by law, it is unacceptable for any User to attempt to log on as any other person or User without the permission from the Superintendent or his/her designate.

  • The only exception will be in the case of troubleshooting access to a System; the only authorized persons permitted to perform this troubleshooting are Information Technology Department personnel.
     

8.    Vandalism and Harassment

8.1.    School District Technology, or Personal Technology connected to the School District Network, must be utilized in a manner that will not negatively impact, or threaten the security or integrity of, Electronic Information Resources, School District Network and School District Technology.
8.2.    Vandalism (including theft or unauthorized access) of Electronic Information Resources  or School District Technology will not be tolerated under any circumstances, and such inappropriate use will be subject to appropriate consequences and sanctions. 
8.3.    Harassment of any other Users or any other persons will not be tolerated under any circumstances, and such inappropriate use will be subject to appropriate consequences and sanctions.
 

9.    School District Property

9.1.    Electronic Information Resources, including all files and data generated under the employ of the district or while a student of the district, are the property of the district.

9.2.    District property may be used only for legitimate educational or operational purposes, or for other purposes referred to in the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy or Regulation or the School District 52 Technology Plan.
 

10.    Email

10.1.    District email accounts are provided for the purposes of exchanging information consistent with the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and Regulation and the mission as stated in the School District 52 Technology Plan.

10.2.    Internet email use in the district is subject to all district policy, regulation and practice.

10.3.    District email use is subject to district review at any time within the boundaries of a User’s reasonable Expectation of Privacy, if it exists (see Section 3.3 above).

10.4.    Personal use of a User’s district email account is permitted as long as the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and Regulation are followed
 

11.    Prohibited Uses of Electronic Information Resources

11.1.    It is prohibited to use School District Technology (including email):

  • For illegal, inappropriate, immoral or other purposes that are inconsistent with district values, principles and policies;
  • For purposes which would bring the reputation of the district into disrepute;
  • To facilitate use of the School District Network for commercial or for profit purposes;
  • To solicit products or services that are incompatible with the mission and purpose of the School District. 
  • For distribution of hate mail, discriminatory remarks and defensive or inflammatory communication material;
  • For the unauthorized or illegal installation, distribution, reproduction, use or plagiarism of copyrighted materials;
  • For the use or distribution of inappropriate language or profanity on the network;
  • To create internet identities to impersonate another person, or use Synonyms or False Personations;
  • To represent or identify oneself inaccurately and/or dishonestly when participating in chat groups, making postings on groups, sending email, or otherwise communicating using School District Technology; or
  • To intentionally obtain or modify files, passwords, and data.


11.2.    Waste of Electronic Information Resources:

  • Users may not deliberately perform acts that waste Electronic Information Resources or unfairly monopolize resources to the exclusion of other Users, including sending mass mailing of emails such as chain emails.
  • Users shall not spend excessive or inappropriate amounts of time on the Internet, including playing games, engaging in on-line chat groups, social networking, printing multiple copies of documents for personal use or otherwise creating unnecessary network traffic.
  • Employees will always restrict their consumption of Electronic Information Resources to those activities related to their duties with the district during regular work hours.

11.3.    Because audio files, video files and pictures have significant storage requirements, and often copyrights, files of this sort may not be downloaded unless they are related to education or otherwise approved by an administrator or supervisor

11.4.    Misuse of software – Users may not misuse software including:

  • Copy software for use on their home computers unless proper authorization is given by the Superintendent or his/her designate;
  • Provide copies of software to any other User unless authorization is granted by the Superintendent or his/her designate;
  • Modify, revise, transform, recast or adapt any software; or
  • Reverse engineer, disassemble or decompile any software.

Exceptions to this may occur for educational purposes with prior authorization by the Superintendent or his/her designate

11.5.    Unless expressly authorized by the Superintendent or his/her designate, sending, transmitting or otherwise disseminating proprietary data, trade secrets or other personal or confidential information of the district is strictly prohibited.  Unauthorized dissemination of information may result in civil liability as well as criminal penalties under Federal or Provincial laws.
 

12.    Passwords

12.1.    The requirement for a System to have a username and password combination, or in some cases only a password, only does not necessarily imply that Users have an Expectation of Privacy.  The district has a formal password requirements detailed in “School District 52 Password Policy  – SD52 Net” – which applies to the majority of Systems.  There are additional password policies at the district for Systems which are not secured by SD52 Net.  Non SD52 Net password policies will be communicated to all users that require access to Systems secured by them.

12.2.    Responsibility for passwords:
•    Users are responsible for safeguarding their passwords for access to School District Technology.  Individual passwords are not to be printed, hand written, stored on-line or given to others unless the Superintendent or his/her designate grants an exception in this regard.
•    Users are directly responsible for all actions and transactions that are made using their individual username and password combination.  No User may access School District Technology with another User’s credentials with the exception of the Information Technology Department for troubleshooting purposes or with permission granted in writing by the Superintendent or his/her designate.
 

13.    Security of Electronic Information Resources

13.1.    Users may not delete, alter, or copy a file belonging to another User without first obtaining permission from the User who made the file.  The only exceptions may be groups of Users that share common electronic workspaces where amongst the group it is generally accepted and understood that modification of electronic resources is part of their role with the district.  The ability to read, alter, or copy files from another User does not imply permission to read, alter, or copy that file.

13.2.    The district employs several shared electronic workspaces where some data does not fall under an exception of being generally accepted for modification.  Users may not use any Electronic Information Resources to snoop or otherwise investigate actions of other Users (for example, by unnecessarily and inappropriately reviewing emails or files).  Similarly, a User’s ability to connect to various computer Systems through any network or utilizing physical access does not imply a right to connect to those Systems or to make use of those Systems unless specifically authorized by the operator of those Systems, except where explicitly permitted to do so by the Information Technology Department or by the Superintendent or his/her designate.
 

14.    Viruses/Malware

14.1.    Because viruses and malware can cause substantial damage to computer Systems, each User is responsible for taking reasonable precautions to ensure that he/she does not introduce viruses into the district’s Electronic Information Resources.  Within reason, all material received on floppy disk, optical media, flash memory device, or other portable data storage media must be scanned with an antivirus product supplied by the Information Technology Department.  A list of antivirus software that is suitable for the district can be obtained by directly contacting the Information Technology Department.

14.2.    Users also understand that, if they choose to bring their Personal Technology to the district, they potentially may have viruses or malware.  Not having current antivirus and antimalware software or other reasonable controls installed on Personal Technology and being the cause of an infection or other deleterious network conditions may be grounds for temporary or permanent restrictions in utilizing Personal Technology to interact with School District Technology.
 

15.    Encryption Software

15.1.    No user is permitted to install or utilize encryption software on any Electronic Information Resources without first obtaining written permission from the Superintendent or his/her designate.  The only exception to this may be in the case of an educational goal where the Superintendent or his/her designate has been made aware beforehand. 

15.2.    The district may implement third party encryption keys and passwords where district personnel may not have the direct ability to decrypt information.  Implementation of these kinds of encryption keys may only be authorized by the Secretary-Treasurer or the Superintendent.
 

16.        Reporting of inappropriate Internet Sites

16.1.    Anyone who becomes aware of an inappropriate Internet site must advise any member of the district Information Technology Department, or any administrator or supervisor/manager, so that appropriate steps may be taken to either block or otherwise restrict who can access the site.

16.2.    Requests to have sites unblocked that are incorrectly blocked should be routed first through the school administrator or building supervisor.  The district has implemented a web content filter that errs slightly on the side of child safety so it is reasonable to expect that some sites will be incorrectly blocked.  The request process to have sites unblocked is intended to be informal and quick within the operational confines of the public education system and the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy and Regulation.
 

17.    Breach of Policy/Regulation

17.1.    Any violation of the Acceptable Use of Technology Policy or Regulation may result in:
•    Loss of access privileges;
•    Loss of volunteer positions;
•    Student disciplinary measures;
•    Employee disciplinary action (up to and including termination); and
•    Legal action including actions taken by the district, by persons unrelated to the district, and/or criminal prosecution
 

18.    Social Networking Sites

18.1.    The District recognizes that social networking sites (such as FaceBook) are increasingly useful for employee-student communications.  Employees should ensure that communications with students on social networking sites are appropriate, and generally are related to a student’s educational program and services or, other school-related activities.  Employee communications with students that are not directly education-related should at all times be appropriate, responsible, and meet professional standards and expectations. 

18.2.    District employees who participate in social networking websites shall not post:
•    Any district data, documents, photographs or other district owned or created information on any website; or
•    Any district material that is private, personal or confidential.

18.3.    District employees should ensure their conduct on social networking websites does not violate the law or any district policies, regulations, procedures, codes of conduct or staff handbooks.  

18.4.    Students are expected to use social networking websites appropriately and responsibly.  Use of social networking websites by students at the district is subject to the school administrator’s right to restrict or entirely block access to some or all social networking websites at their school.

18.5.    Employees should refrain from accessing social networking websites for personal use during work hours.  

18.6.    Any employee who violates Sections 18.1 through 18.5 may be subject to appropriate disciplinary action (up to and including termination), in accordance with applicable district policy, regulation, procedures, codes of conduct, staff handbooks, the School Act and/or collective agreements.
 

19.    Courteous Use of Electronic Information Resources

19.1.    School District Technology should be utilized at all times in a manner that upholds the integrity of the district and does not compromise the learning environment.

19.2.    In general Users should always consider that, when using Electronic Information Resources to communicate, he/she is communicating with a real person.  Electronic communications should be courteous and respectful at all times.  In addition, it is important for all users to weigh carefully the content of their messages as well as the tone in which it is delivered.
 

20.    Personal Safety

20.1.    It is important for all employees to protect and educate students about use of Electronic Information Resources in order to maximize the potential of all Users to have a safe experience. The following are guidelines to follow around personal safety as it pertains to Electronic Information Resources:
•    Do not give out personal information; and
•    Specifically for students:
•    tell Parents and teachers right away if you encounter any information that makes you uncomfortable, especially if you encounter cyber-bullying;
•    never agree to get together with someone you meet online without first checking with your Parents and teachers;
•    never use a personal picture or anything else without first checking with Parents and teachers;
•    do not respond to any messages sent or meant in any way to make you feel uncomfortable, especially if you are feeling bullied.
 

21.    User Information and Data

21.1.    The district may occasionally require new registration and account information from Users to continue existing services or to provide new services.  The district will never use email to ask for passwords or personal user information for Systems that you access; any email asking for such credential information should be immediately brought to the attention of a teacher, administrator, supervisor and/or the Director of Information Technology (see Section 7.2).

21.2.    Although the district has implemented disaster recovery policies for application, file and email servers, it is the responsibility of individual Users to ensure their personal work is stored on district file and email servers so that it will be backed up.  Users are responsible for backup of all other data critical to themselves.  All backups of Systems must be stored in a secured location.  Because backups contain extensive User information, the loss of any backup media must be immediately brought to the attention of the Superintendent.

21.3.    The district has enabled mobile technology to access our email and collaboration servers.  There are access controls that force secure remote wipe of mobile technology that must be accepted before the mobile technology is permitted to connect to Electronic Information Resources.  In the event that mobile technology that is connected to Electronic Information Resources is misplaced or stolen, the User must bring this to the attention of the Information Technology Department so that appropriate measures can be taken to remotely disable access.

21.4.    Intentional defeating of remote wipe access controls on mobile technology (personal or district owned) connected to Electronic Information Resources will result in immediate suspension of access to those systems.

21.5.    When a User leaves the district, their accounts will be immediately disabled, but not necessarily deleted.  Final deletion of the User accounts is at the discretion of the Director of Information Technology or the Superintendent.  A disabled account of a User that has left the district may be re-activated and the password reset at the direction of the Director of Information Technology, the Superintendent or the Secretary Treasurer.
 

22.    Copyrighted Software/Materials

22.1.    The illegal installation of copyrighted software files for use on School District Technology is prohibited.

22.2.    Users of software shall abide by the software licensing agreement between the district and the vendor of said software.

22.3.    Without notice, any School District Technology may be audited for compliance.

22.4.    Posting, downloading or distributing copyrighted or unlawful materials is prohibited.  If you are unsure about how to make copyrighted materials available within the license of the copyright holder, you must contact the Information Technology Department for clarification.
 

23.    District and School Websites

23.1.    The district is responsible for setting the look, feel, and operation of all public facing internet sites.  District websites may only be hosted on School District Technology or hosting that is directly under control of the Information Technology Department.

23.2.    In general, outside of setup and initial configuration, individual school administrators are responsible for content posted to school websites and building supervisors are responsible for content posted to building websites.

 

24.    Amendment of this policy

24.1.    This Acceptable Use of Technology Regulation may be amended or revised from time to time as the need arises.  Users will be advised of all amendments and revisions and will be expected to comply with the most current version of the regulation.

 

Related Policies and Regulations:

Bylaw #7        Freedom of Information/Protection of Privacy Bylaw
Policy 1410        District Code of Conduct Policy
Regulation 1410-10        District Code of Conduct
Policy 3350:        Acceptable Use of Technology
Policy 6710        Records Management Program Policy
Regulation 6710-10        Records Management Program

 

[1] Cyber Bullying definition taken from www.cyberbullying.org quote of Bill Belsey.


3410 | Security and Protection of Buildings Policy

Reasonable precaution will be taken to ensure that school district buildings are safe and secure and that the building envelopes and interior finishes are protected. All staff are to adhere to the Regulations of this policy. 

 

References:

3410-20 - - Security of School Buildings 
3430-10 - - Control of Keys and Security Codes 
3620-10 - - Protection of Building Envelopes and Interior Finishes 
4230-20 - - Accident Prevention in Schools 
5230-10 - - Billeting in Schools 


3410-20 | Security of School Buildings

The custodian is responsible for securing windows and doors, and arming the security system each evening.  At times when no custodian is on duty in a school the security of the building is the responsibility of the Principal.

  1. Keys and security codes are distributed in accordance with 3430-10 Control of Keys and Security Codes Regulation.
  2. Staff requesting access to the school when the custodian is not in the building must arrange for access through the Principal.
  3. The Principal will ensure that all staff are familiar with the fire and intruder alarm system and procedures for arming and disarming the system.
  4. Staff who access the building when the custodian is not on duty are responsible for securing windows and doors, and arming the security system on leaving the building.
  5. Keys and security codes are not to be provided to anyone other than employees at any time, with the following exceptions:
    • An organization that enters into a lease for the use of school space (for example, a day care provider).
    • Instructors from other organizations (e.g. Northwest Community College) where an agreement is in place for the course to be provided on school district property.
    • Contractors hired to complete work in a school or other facility.
    • Emergency service providers (police and fire).
  6. If a school is to be rented for community purposes when a custodian is not on duty then the group sponsoring the activity must arrange for an employee to provide access and to arm the system after the activity. This must be requested through the Principal. Any costs incurred for such call-out shall be borne by the user.

 

References:
3410 Security and Protection of Buildings Policy
3430-10 Control of Keys and Security Codes Regulation
5220 Use of Schools, Grounds and Equipment Policy
5220-10 Use of Schools, Grounds and Equipment Regulation
5220-20 Northwest Community College Use of Schools and Equipment


3420 | Video Surveillance Policy

The Board of Education supports a variety of programs and practices to improve student safety, employee safety and the protection of school property.  Each year significant funds from the district operations budget are spent to repair school property damaged from vandalism.  The need to deter destructive acts, theft and/or other criminal activities should be balanced with a commitment to providing a learning environment for students and a working environment for staff and others that recognizes the right to assemble and associate without undue intrusion on personal privacy.  The Board supports the controlled use of video surveillance systems in the district where circumstances have shown that their benefit to deter theft, destructive acts and acts of violence outweighs the impact on the privacy of those observed.

A recorded video record is recognized to be subject to the provisions of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FOIPPA).

 

References:

Bylaw #7 Freedom of Information/Protection of Privacy Bylaw

6710 - - Records Management 
6710-10 - - Records Management Regulation 
3420-10 - - Video Surveillance 
3420-10A - - Video Surveillance - Form 


3420-10 | Video Surveilance

Use

  1. Video cameras may be used to monitor and/or record.
  2. Long term storage of video data must be labeled and dated.
  3. Before video surveillance is introduced or expanded, a Privacy Impact Assessment Form must be provided to the Superintendent of Schools describing the circumstances that indicate the necessity of having surveillance at that location, including consideration of less invasive alternatives.  Details of the request shall include:
    • background and rationale for the request;
    • description of other less intrusive alternatives already tried;
    • evidence of consultation with, and support from, the School Planning Council;
    • intended location of camera, hours of operation and area under surveillance; and
    • location of notices advising that video surveillance is in place.
  4. Location of cameras at new sites shall be consistent with past practice and experience indicating areas of probable incidents such as theft, destructive acts, acts of vandalism and/or threats against personal safety in the relevant area.  Areas chosen for surveillance will be those where surveillance is considered to be a necessary and viable deterrent or to apprehend the person(s) involved.
  5. Video surveillance camera locations must be authorized by the Superintendent (or designate) of the School District.  Any change in camera location must be authorized in the same manner.
  6. Public notification signs in areas that are subject to video surveillance will be displayed in accordance with Section 3.1 below.
  7. Video surveillance is not to be ordinarily used or positioned in a location where individuals have a right to expect privacy and where common sense public expectation of privacy is compromised. (i.e. change rooms, washrooms, staff rooms, private conference/meeting rooms, neighbourhood buildings and windows.)  The Superintendent must authorize any exception to this on the grounds that no other supervision option is feasible, and that the need is pressing and outweighs the privacy interest of the student or other person likely to be observed.  Surveillance of such locations may not be authorized on an ongoing basis.

 

Security/Privacy

  1. Security and retention of video records will be the responsibility of authorized administrative and operations staff.  All video records shall be labeled in a manner to facilitate identification and audits.
  2. Only a designated employee or agent of the School District will install video cameras.  Only designated employees or agents and the building administrator shall have access to the key that opens the camera boxes.  Only these employees shall handle the camera or video recordings or have access to the computer or hard drive.
  3. Videotapes shall be stored in a locked filing cabinet or in a secure manner in an area to which students and the public do not normally have access.
  4. Video records shall not be edited or selectively erased. Video records are to be kept intact until totally erased, degaussed or destroyed as to remove any recorded information.
  5. Tapes may never be sold, publicly viewed or distributed in any other fashion except as provided for by this policy and appropriate legislation.
  6. All video tapes that are in use must be numbered and dated for identification.  When tapes are erased and reused, they must be re-numbered and re-dated.

 

Notice to Students, Parents and Public

  1. The public shall be made aware of the existence of video surveillance by clearly written and prominently displayed signage at all points of building access where cameras are installed.  These signs shall indicate the presence of cameras for the purpose of surveillance.  Signage must include contact information of the building administrator or designated staff person who is responsible for answering questions about the surveillance system.  Any exception to this, such as for a time-limited specific investigation into criminal conduct, must be authorized by the Superintendent of Schools on the grounds that covert surveillance is essential to the success of the investigation and the need outweighs the privacy interest of the persons likely to observed.  Covert surveillance may not be authorized on an on-going basis.
  2. On any bus equipped for video camera operation, one or more decals advising that a camera system is in place will be displayed on the interior of the bus.  

 

Viewing of Tapes

  1. Monitors used to view stored video data should not be located in a position that enables public viewing.  Videotapes may only be viewed by the building administrator or the individual authorizing camera installation, by School District staff with a direct involvement with the recorded contents of the specific videotape, or by employees or agents responsible for the technical operations of the system (for technical purposes only).  Search and reviewing capabilities on digital systems must be protected by password access.
  2. If an employee is facing any disciplinary action, the employee may view the recording and may authorize a union representative to also view the recording.  If a student is facing any disciplinary action, his parents/guardians may view the recording and may authorize his advocate to also view the recording.  Such must be done by appointment and in the presence of an administrator.  Viewing may be refused or limited where viewing would be an unreasonable invasion of a third party's personal privacy, would give rise to a concern for a third party's safety, or on any other grounds recognized in FOIPPA.
  3. If criminal activity is suspected, then the video recording will be viewed by the police liaison officer.

 

Retention of Videotapes

  1. Where an incident raises a prospect of a legal action, the tape, or a copy of it, shall be sent to the Secretary-Treasurer's office and to the Board’s insurers.
  2. Video recordings shall be erased within one month unless they are being retained at the request of the building administrator, Board Office, employee, parent or student for documentation related to a specific incident, or are being transferred to the Board's insurers.
  3. Video recordings retained under 5.2 above shall be erased as soon as the incident in questions has been resolved, except that if the recording has been used in the making of a decision about an individual, the recording must be kept for a minimum of one year, as required by FOIPPA.
  4. Video recording media will be destroyed when they are no longer re-usable.

 

Review

  1. The Director of Operations, in conjunction with each building administrator, is responsible for ensuring that video monitoring is to be carried out in accordance with Policy 3420 – Video Surveillance and these regulations and procedures.
  2. The Board will not accept the improper use of video surveillance and will take appropriate action in any cases of wrongful use of this policy.
  3. The Superintendent or designate shall conduct a review at least annually to ensure that these regulation and procedures are being adhered to and to make a report to the Board of Education on the use of video surveillance in the district.

3420-10A | Video Surveillance - Form

Reference Title View

Video Surveillance - Form

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3430-10 | Control of Keys and Security Codes

Building security is necessary to protect the students and employees of the district, as well as to protect the assets in the building and the building itself.  An important part of building security is the control of keys and security codes.  Keys and security codes are made available to employees based on operational and educational needs.

Under no circumstances shall an employee share their key or security code.

Issuing of Keys:

  1. Appropriate master keys and security codes are issued to:
    • Senior Board Office staff
    • Principals & Vice-Principals
    • Custodians
    • Maintenance staff
  2. The school principal is responsible for the issuance and safeguarding of school keys.
  3. Teachers requiring access to schools during the summer may make arrangements with the Principal or Vice Principal.

Lost Keys:

  1. Any lost key must be reported immediately to the school principal and the Director of Operations.
  2. A written report of the circumstances related to the loss of the key must be submitted to the Secretary-Treasurer as soon as possible following the initial report.

Return of Keys:

  1. All keys must be returned to the school principal at the end of the school year in June.
  2. During summer vacation, the principal may retain the keys in a secure location at the school or forward for safekeeping to the Secretary-Treasurer,
  3. Any employee leaving the employ of the Board will return their keys prior to their departure.

Reporting and Documentation:

  1. The Director of Operations is responsible for maintaining a list of all master keys issued.
  2. The school principal is responsible for maintaining a list of all outdoor and indoor keys issued.
  3. The school principal will report to the Secretary-Treasurer any keys not returned at the end of the school year.

Changes to Keys and Locks:

  1. Any changes to the keying of locks require the approval of the Director of Operations.
  2. Additional keys can only be made by the Director of Operations.

3510 | School Closures Policy

POLICY

The Board is committed to providing broad community consultation when considering the permanent closure of school buildings owned by the Board.

For the purposes of this policy and the accompanying regulations, permanent closure shall mean closing a school for a period in excess of twelve (12) months.  Closures of schools for the purpose of repairs, renovations, or additions shall not be deemed a permanent closure.


REFERENCES
BC Ministry of Education School Act, Section 73
BC Ministry of Education School Opening and Closure Order, 194/08
BC Ministry of Education Policy, School Building Closure and Disposal
School District Regulation, School Closures

 

Related Policies and Procedures

3510-10  School Closure Regulation


3510-10 | School Closure Regulation

Preamble: School Districts are required to have a regulation that includes a public consultation process with respect to permanent school closures and this regulation must be available to the public.

 

Regulation

  1. The Board will publicly announce by reading of a School Closure Bylaw at a Public Board Meeting that the Board will be considering the closure of one or more schools.
  2. A period of not less than sixty (60) days for public consultation will take place between the reading of the School Closure Bylaw and the Public Board Meeting when the final decision is made to close one or more schools.
  3. All persons or groups in the community who could be affected by a school closure should be made aware of the public consultation process.
  4. The Board will advertise the School Closure Bylaw in local newspaper(s) and will provide contact information to obtain information regarding the public consultation and decision making process.
  5. The Board will hold at least one Public Forum as part of the consultation process. The purpose of the Public Forum will be to discuss the proposed closure, provide information regarding the proposed closure, provide summaries of submissions, and listen to community concerns and alternative proposed options.
  6. The time and location of the Public Forum shall be appropriately advertised in local newspaper(s) and on the school district website to ensure at least seven (7) days advance notification to affected persons or groups in the community. Parents or guardians of students currently attending the school will be given written notification.
  7. The Board will provide information and directions describing how affected persons can submit written responses to the Board with respect to the proposed school closure.
  8. Consultation will be meaningful, and fair consideration will be given to all public input prior to the Board making its final decision.
  9. The Board shall make available the following information at the Public Forum:
    • Reasons for the proposed school closure;
    • The specific school(s) being considered for closure;
    • How the proposed closure(s) would affect catchment areas;
    • The general effect of the closure on surrounding schools;
    • The number of students who would be affected both in the school(s) being considered for closure and the surrounding schools;
    • The educational program/course implications for the affected students;
    • The proposed effective date for the closure;
    • The financial considerations of the closure;
    • The impact on the proposed closure on the School Board’s Capital Plan;
    • The implementation plans for the proposed closure;
    • Alternate options to the proposed closure;
    • Contents of written submissions presented to the Board by members of the community.
  10. The final decision to permanently close a school will be done at a Public School Board Meeting by voting on the third reading of the School Closure Bylaw.
  11. The closure of a school should not normally take place until the September following the final decision.
  12. Following a final decision to close a school, the Board shall provide written notification to the Minister of Education of the decisions and will include the following information:
    • The name of the School
    • The facility number of the School
    • The address of the School
    • The date the School will permanently close

 

 

Related Polices and Regulations:
3510 School Closure Policy


3520 | Disposal of Land and Improvements Policy

POLICY 

The Board is responsible for the disposal (including by sale, leases, or the granting of a charge) of real property and may dispose of land or improvements, such as buildings affixed to land, subject to the orders of the Minister of Education. 

The primary purpose of Board-owned property is to deliver and support educational programs to students served by the Board. If the Board no longer requires property for educational purposes, it must seek the approval of the Minister prior to disposing of the property by sale and transfer or by a lease of 10 years of more, unless the Board is selling or leasing land or buildings to another Board (including the Conseil Scolaire Francophone) or independent school for educational purposes. 

The Board must engage in broad consultation and in enhanced planning regarding underutilized school buildings and other property owned by the Board prior to property disposition. 

After considering future educational needs of the school district, the Board may deem property to be no longer required for educational purposes. This Policy and accompanying Regulations outline the terms and conditions that the Minister will consider in the approval of the Board’s request to dispose of real property, including the sale, exchange, or lease of 10 years or more of land or improvements, or both. 

REFERENCES 

  • School Act sections 65 (5), 73, 96 (3), 99 (2), 100 (2), and 168 (2)(p)(t) 
  • Ministerial Order M193/08, Disposal of Land or Improvements Order 
  • Ministerial Order M320/02, School Opening and Closure Order 
  • Ministry Policy: School Building Closure and Disposal Policy 
  • Ministry Policy: Allocation of Proceeds from the Disposition of Capital Assets Policy 
  • 3520-10 Disposal of Land and Improvements Regulation 

3520-10 | Disposal of Land and Improvements

When disposing of land, buildings, leases, rights-of-way and easements the process outlined in this regulation will be followed as required by School Act Sections 73, 96 (3) and 168 (2) (p) and (t), and the Ministry’s School Opening and Closure Order and Disposal of Land or Improvements Order.

Sale of Asset:

  • Prior to the disposition the future educational needs of the school district are to be considered, including early learning, grades K to 12 and adult learning.
  • Prior to the disposition the future needs of the school for alternative community use are considered in consultation with local government and community organizations.
  • The disposition of the land or improvements will be at fair market value if sold to entities other than another Board of Education, independent school, local government or community organization and will be done through a public process.
  • The disposition of the land and improvements does not have to be at fair market value if sold to another Board of Education, independent school, local government or community organization.
  • Approval of the disposition from the Minister of Education is required.

School District Bylaw:

  • To conclude disposition of land or improvements, the School District must first pass a Bylaw which will include:
    • Confirmation that the Board will not require the property for future educational purposes;
    • The name and facility number of the property; and
    • The address and legal description of the property.

Notification of Minister:

The Board will, without delay, notify the Minister of the disposition and provide a copy of the Bylaw, information regarding the disposition and the allocation of the proceeds as required under Section 100(2) of the School Act.

Application:

This regulation does not apply to grants of Crown Land described in Section 99 of the School Act.

 

References:

School Act

School Opening and Closure Order M194/08

Disposal of Land or Improvements Order M193/08

3510                School Closure Policy

3520                Disposal of Land and Improvements Policy


3530 | Disposal of Surplus Assets Policy

POLICY 
The Board endorses the reasonable disposal of surplus equipment and assets. Equipment that is declared to be surplus or unfit for further use shall be disposed of in accordance with the Regulations accompanying this policy. 


3530-10 | Disposition of Asset (Excluding Land)

  1. The District will ordinarily attempt to sell at fair market value assets surplus to its needs. 
  2. The District may donate assets to recognized non profit organizations or to other government bodies. 
  3. The Director of Operations will be consulted to determine if the assets would be of value to another District building.
  4. For assets with an anticipated residual value equal or greater than $1,000.00 the District will advertise requests for sealed bids. 
  5. For assets with an anticipated residual value less than $1,000.00 the method of disposal shall be determined by the Secretary Treasurer. The District will minimize costs related with asset disposition.
  6. Public auction and garage sale(s) are acceptable processes for the sale of assets. 
  7. In the event that assets cannot be sold or donated, the District will first look to recycle the assets.  Where storage and waste diversion options are not practical the District will dispose of assets in the landfill.

3610-10 | Deputy Fire Chief Letter

The following instructions from the Deputy Fire Chief should be regarded as School District Regulations.  (Exhibit 7.1.4.1.1)

CITY OF PRINCE RUPERT
FIRE DEPARTMENT

200 West 1st Avenue,
Prince Rupert, B.C.

March 26, 1992

Mr. H. A. Stewart
Operations Manager
School District No. 52
634 - 6th Avenue
Prince Rupert, B.C.
V8J 1X1

Dear Mr. Stewart:

As per your request, I have compiled an updated list of maximum occupant loads for the assembly areas of the district #52 schools.

The following list indicates the maximum number of persons to be allowed in the assembly areas of each school.

LOCATION                                                                            AREA                                      MAXIMUM ALLOWED

CONRAD STREET ELEMENTARY                                           GYM                                          300 persons

KANATA ELEMENTARY                                                         GYM                                          320 persons

KING EDWARD ELEMENTARY                                               GYM                                          338 persons

PINERIDGE ELEMENTARY                                                     GYM                                          341 persons

ROOSEVELT ELEMENTARY                                                   GYM                                          296 persons

SEAL COVE ELEMENTARY                                                    GYM                                          330 persons

WESTVIEW ELEMENTARY                                                     GYM                                          334 persons

CHARLES HAYS SECONDARY SCHOOL                                 GYM

                                                                                (floor only when bleachers closed)               633 persons

                                                                                (bleachers only)                                         400 persons

                                                                                (floor area when bleachers open)                 482 persons

                                                                                (total floor and bleachers)                           882 persons

                                                                                                MULTI PURPOSE ROOM

                                                                                (floor only)                                                 217 persons

                                                                                (floor and bleachers)                                   277 persons

PRINCE RUPERT SECONDARY SCHOOL                                  GYM

                                                                                (floor area)                                                  520 persons

                                                                                (fixed seating)                                             340 persons

                                                                                Total                                                          860 persons

 

The maximum occupant load for the above mentioned assembly areas were calculated using the formula set out in the Public Hall and Theatre Safety Regulations.  (Pursuant to the Fire Services Act of B.C.)

I have also enclosed a copy of the B.C. Fire Commissioners Guidelines on SEATING LAYOUTS IN SCHOOL ASSEMBLY AREAS AND OTHER SIMILAR OCCUPANCIES.  These guidelines show the correct and acceptable layouts for seating in school assembly areas.

Thank you for your attention to fire safety.

Yours truly,

 

R.G.Miller,
Deputy Fire Chief,
Prince Rupert Fire Department

Reference Title View

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3610-20 | Seating as Regulated by the Fire Services Act

The number of persons and the seating arrangement for halls are regulated by the Fire Services Act and is summarized as follows:

Regulations Governing Occupancy, and Safety of Community Halls and Assembly Halls
 

Section 16  Number of Persons Admitted

(a)  No manager, licencee, or employee shall admit to any hall more than one person for each 12 square feet of hall floor area unless approved by the Fire Commissioner.

(b)  The owner or occupier shall cause a notice setting forth the maximum number of persons and conditions for which the premises were approved which shall be posted in a conspicuous place within the hall.  Such notice to be in a form prescribed by the Fire Commissioner.
 

Section 18  Seating

Separate and detailed plans and specifications of the seating in halls where seating is permitted shall be submitted in duplicate to the Fire Commissioner or the Local Assistant for approval.  All rows of seats on the main floor shall be spaced not less than 32 inches measured from back to back and rows of seats in any gallery or balcony shall be spaced not less than 30 inches measured in like manner.  There shall be not more than seven seats between any one seat and an aisle.  Where common chairs are used for seating, such chairs shall, at the discretion of the Fire Commissioner or the local Assistant be battened together or secured to the floor in an approved manner.
 

Section 19  Obstructions

  1. No person shall sit, stand or loiter in any aisle, stairway or passageway of any hall.
  2. No person shall obstruct or cause or permit to be obstructed, any aisle, stairway, or passageway in a hall by the placing of construction, or leaving of anything therein or thereon.
  3. The proprietor or person in charge of any hall shall not permit or cause any person or persons to do anything in violation of this regulation.

3620-10 | Protection of Building Envelopes and Interior Finishes

To ensure the protection of building envelopes and interior finishes so that the life span of such are maximized, these Regulations will be followed.

  1. Use tack boards only to display student work and other poster material.
     
  2. If fastening materials to finished walls, etc., use no mar materials (no scotch tape, nails, staples, etc.).
     
  3. Clean chalk brushes using vacuum cleaner (do not use exterior of building).
     
  4. Murals, paintings, etc., shall not be applied directly to the building fabric (separate panels or hung canvas should be used).
     
  5. See Fire Prevention Regulation for information pertaining to tackboards.
     
  6. Activities such as floor hockey will be permitted in school gymnasiums providing equipment used for the game will not damage the floor surface.

4 | Student and/or Parent Appeal Bylaw

Preamble

Whereas Section 11 of the School Act provides that the Board of School Trustees of School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) (the “Board”) shall establish, by bylaw, an appeal procedure for students and parents of students;

And Whereas the Board wished to enact its procedure for the conduct of such appeals;

Now therefore in open meeting assembled, the Board enacted the following

 

STUDENT AND/OR PARENT APPEAL BYLAW

1.         A student enrolled in an educational program in the School District or the parents of the student shall be entitled to appeal a decision, including a failure to make a decision, of any employee of the Board which significantly affects the education, health or safety of the student pursuant to this Bylaw.

2.         The following decisions shall be deemed to significantly affect the education, health or safety of a student:

            a)         suspension from school for disciplinary reasons for a period in excess of five consecutive schools days;

            b)         suspension from school for a health condition;

            c)         placement in an educational program;

            d)         grade promotion and graduation;

            e)         refusal to offer an educational program to a student 16 years of age or older;

            f)          any other decision that in the opinion of the Board significantly affects the education, health or safety of a student.

 

3.         An appeal must be commenced within a reasonable period of time from the date that the student or parent was informed of the decision being appealed.   The Board must make a decision regarding the appeal as soon as practicable after receiving the appeal.

 

4.         The Board may refuse to hear an appeal if:

           a)         the appeal has not been initiated within a reasonable time from the date of the decision being appealed;

           b)         the student/parent appealing the decision has not first discussed the decision being appealed with any persons identified by the Superintendent or designate;

           c)         the Board determines that the decision does not significantly affect the student’s education, health or safety.

 

5.         If a student younger than 19 years of age appeals an employee’s decision pursuant to this Bylaw, the Board shall provide written notification to the student’s parents.

 

6.         An appeal shall be initiated by providing to the Superintendent of Schools a written Notice of Appeal (attached to this Bylaw).

 

7.         The Notice of Appeal shall include the following information:

            a)         a description of the decision that is being appealed;

            b)         the name of the employee who made the decision;

            c)         the date the person bringing the appeal learned of the decision being appealed;

            d)         the grounds of the appeal and the suggested resolution;

            e)         the name of the student on whose behalf the appeal is being filed;

            f)          the name of the school and the grade the student is enrolled in;

            g)         the name, telephone number, and address where the person filing the appeal may be contacted;

            h)         the steps that the student and/or his/her parents have taken to attempt to resolve the matter directly with the employee(s).

 

8.         The Board may consider an appeal notwithstanding any defect in form or other technical irregularity.

 

9.         The Superintendent of Schools or designate may, prior to the Board hearing the appeal, require that the student and/or his/her parents (the “Appellants”) discuss the decision being appealed with one or more persons.

 

10.       At any time during the appeal process, the Appellants are entitled to be accompanied by a parent, advocate, support person or interpreter/translator.

 

11.       The Superintendent or his designate shall immediately notify the employee whose decision is being appealed that an appeal has been filed.

 

12.       Prior to referring an appeal to the Board of a hearing, the Superintendent of Schools or designate shall gather all information relevant to the appeal and prepare a report for the Board concerning the appeal.  The Appellants and the employee shall be entitled to a copy of the Superintendent’s report.

 

13.       The Board may make any interim decision it considers necessary pending the disposition of the appeal.

 

14.       An appeal shall be heard by the Board at a hearing.   The Appellants shall be provided with written notice of the date, time and location of the meeting.

 

15.       At the hearing, the Board shall consider:

            a)         the report prepared by the Superintendent or designate regarding the appeal and any comments the Superintendent or designate may wish to make regarding the report or the appeal;

            b)         any written or oral submissions presented by the Appellants;

            c)         any written or oral submissions made by the employee whose decision is under appeal;

            d)         any other information, which in the opinion of the Board, may be of assistance to the Board for disposing of the appeal.

 

16.       The Board shall have the right to question any person appearing at the appeal hearing.

 

17.       The Board shall make any decision that it considers appropriate in respect of the matter that is being appealed and the decision of the Board is final.

 

18.       The Board’s decision shall be made in writing and shall be promptly reported to the Appellant and the employee whose decision is being appealed.

 

19.       If an appeal to the Board does not resolve the concerns of the student or parent or guardian, he or she may appeal to a superintendent of achievement, so long as the matter falls within the scope of the Appeals Regulation as noted in #2.

 

20.       An appeal to a superintendent of Achievement may be started only after a Section 11 appeals to the Board has been hear and a decision has been made.

 

 

A Guide to the Student Appeal Bylaw

The Board of School Trustees recognizes that it has a responsibility to be responsive to our learning community, and is committed to making every reasonable effort to achieve a standard of excellence in both its programs and services.   In keeping with this commitment, the Board pledges that it will endeavour to maintain fair, transparent and easily accessible processes and systems which are intended to support student learning and achievement.  

 

Consistent with these values and principles, and as required by the School Act, students and parents of students may appeal to the Board of School Trustees a decision of a School District employee, including the failure of an employee to make a decision, which significantly affects the education, health or safety of a student.

 

If a student or parent of a student initiates an appeal, the Board will make all reasonable efforts to resolve the matter in an effective and timely manner.   The details for initiating an appeal are outlined in the Student Appeal bylaw, which can be located on the School District’s website (www.sd52.bc.ca), or is available at any school or the District office.   It is important that a student or parent of a student initiates an appeal of a decision within a reasonable time from the date of the decision being appealed.

 

The focus of the Student Appeal Bylaw is to make an accessible dispute resolution process available to students and parents.  Where appeals are initiated, attempts will first be made to try and resolve any concerns with the assistance of school and District staff.   If those attempts prove unsuccessful, then the parent or student may appeal directly to the Board of School Trustees.

 

If you have any trouble understanding how the Student Appeal Bylaw works, you should feel free to ask your child’s school principal, or anyone at the District office (624-6717) to explain the process to you.

 

You may also contact the Advocacy Help Line for assistance at 627-6200.  The Advocacy Help Line is sponsored by the BC Advocacy Project, which is designed to give parents an important voice in the education of their children.   The Advocacy Help Line is free; confidential; solution-oriented; open 24-hours a day; staffed by trained parent volunteers and is available to any parent, guardian or student.

 

 

STUDENT AND/OR PARENT APPEAL FORM

1.         The appeal must be made in writing within ten school days of the decision by the school or employee that you are appealing.

2.         Complete this Appeal Form.

3.         Bring the form (within ten school days) to your school Principal or to the:

           School Board Office, 634 - 6th Avenue East, Prince Rupert, B.C.  V8J 1X1  250-624-6717

4.         You may have an advocate assist you throughout the appeal.

5.         You will be contacted by the school district.  In an attempt to resolve the appeal and depending on the circumstances, you may be asked to:

             Speak to the teacher, or

            Speak to the Principal, or

             Meet with the Appeal Committee.

6.         If the appeal cannot be resolved through the above steps, the appeal will be decided upon by the School Board.

             Date:

             Students Name:

             Date of Birth:

            Parent/Guardian Name:

            Address:

           Telephone Number        Home:_____________    Work: ______________

           Student’s School:                                               Student’s Grade:                        Teacher:

What decision of a school district employee that significantly affects you or your child's education, health or safety are you appealing?  (What did the school do that you are appealing?)

 

 

When were you informed of the decision?

 

 

Who informed you?

 

 

Who made the decision?

 

 

What are the grounds for the appeal?  (What are you unhappy about?)

 

 

 

What relief is sought?  (What changes do you want?)

 

 

______________________________________

Signature of the Person Appealing

 

_____________________________________

Printed Name of the Person Appealing

(Please attach a separate sheet if you need more space to comment on any of the questions.)


4110 | Emergency Preparedness Policy

RATIONALE

The Board of Education is committed to providing high standards of health, safety, and security for all students, staff and visitors.  The purpose of this policy and its accompanying regulations is to ensure that action plans are prepared to deal with emergencies.

This policy describes considerations that must be addressed to prepare for emergencies that might threaten the personal safety or life of persons on school district premises, or threaten district facilities.

 

POLICY

An emergency is a sudden, unexpected occurrence requiring immediate action to stabilize a situation.  Emergencies affecting school facilities, school buses and/or water taxis for an unspecified period of time include, but are not limited to:

  • earthquake
  • fire
  • tsunami
  • hazardous material accident/spills
  • threats to schools (e.g. intruders, bomb threats)
  • school bus or water taxi accident
  • severe weather

The Board recognizes the importance of being prepared for various types of emergencies.  It is important that appropriate plans and procedures are developed to deal with such emergencies.  It is also important that students, employees and parents be knowledgeable about the various emergency plans and procedures in order to be as prepared as possible in the event of an actual emergency.  To this end:

  1. all employees shall be informed about the emergency plans and procedures to be followed at their work site, to ensure their safety and the safety of others;
  2. students and employees shall practice the emergency plans and procedures implemented at their school or work site;
  3. parents shall be advised of the emergency procedures developed at the school(s), buses and/or water taxis where their child(ren) are attending and/or riding; and
  4. materials and supplies kept on hand to support school emergency procedures shall be in good order.
Reference Title View

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4110-10 | Emergency Preparedness - Fire Response

1.  Raise the Alarm

  • If Indoors:
    • Pull the nearest fire alarm.
    • If you cannot reach an alarm, notify the principal or designate, and any other nearby occupants, by any means available to you.
    • The secretary will, when safely outside the building, use a cell phone to call
      9-1-1, advising the operator of:
      • name and address of the school;
      • nature of fire, if known; and
      • whereabouts of school/building occupants.
  • If Outdoors:
    • notify the principal or designate, and any other nearby occupants, of the fire by any means available to you.
    • Move students to the designated assembly area.

 

2.  Evacuate the Building

  • Upon hearing a fire alarm, teachers will:
    • ensure all classroom activities stop; (gas and equipment, if applicable, are shut off unless doing so jeopardizes the employee’s safety);
    • ascertain if it is safe to exit the classroom via the designated evacuation route;
    • if able to exit classroom as planned, direct students to walk in a quiet and orderly manner along the evacuation route to the designated assembly area;
    • activate evacuation plans for any students with special needs;
    • when exiting, attempt to close all classroom windows and doors, if possible;
    • bring a class list, which includes that day’s attendance;
    • if unable to exit the classroom, have students sit on the floor against the outside wall;
    • if unable to exit the classroom, open exterior window and evacuate if on the ground floor, or call for help through the open window if unable to evacuate.
  • All employees will ensure that all occupants are able to immediately evacuate the building using the designated evacuation routes to a safe assembly area.
  • The earthquake kit must be taken to the command post.  Emergency medical forms and supplies will be kept close to or within the earthquake kit.
  • The visitor log must be taken to the command post.

 

3.  Fight the Fire Only If:

  • The fire department has been notified.
  • Students have been evacuated.
  • The fire is small and not spreading to other areas.
  • Escaping the area is possible by backing towards the nearest exit.
  • The fire extinguisher is in working order and personnel are trained to use it

 

4.  Account for all Occupants

  • Teachers will:
    • immediately take attendance at the assembly area;
    • immediately report any missing students, staff and/or visitors to the command post; and
    • apply I.D. information to all primary and injured students; if I.D. tags are missing, write I.D information on children’s foreheads.
  • The Principal will:
    • set up a command post;
    • determine if all students, staff, and visitors have safely exited the school building(s); and
    • inform fire department officials immediately upon their attendance of names and ages of unaccounted for students, staff, visitors and their possible location in the building, including any students with special needs waiting in secure areas of the school for assistance to be removed from the building.
  • All building occupants will remain outside the building until the Principal or designate announces that it is safe to reenter.
  • If it is impossible or unsafe to return to the school building, follow emergency student release procedures.
  • Students must wait to be reunited with parents or guardians through the Student Release Station; keep accurate records of students released. If there are any students remaining after school hours, they must be accommodated at the school or at an identified Evacuation Reception Centre.

 

5.  Situation Management

  • The Principal will attempt to confirm the location of the fire in the facility, to advise the responding fire department.
  • Teachers will:
    • remind students that parents may be delayed in calling for them; and
    • encourage students to talk about their anxieties and fears.
  • The Principal will:
    • oversee first aid, if necessary;
    • ensure all entrances to school property are open and not blocked;
    • disconnect utilities and equipment unless doing so jeopardizes employee safety; and
    • stand by and be of assistance to fire department officials, as needed.
  • All media queries regarding a fire at a district school or facility will be handled through the office of the Superintendent, in consultation with the local fire department.

 

Related Policies and Regulations

4110      Emergency Preparedness Policy
4110-12 Emergency Preparedness - fire Prevention
4110-90 Emergency Preparedness - Emergency Drills
4310-40 Emergency Preparedness - Incident Reporting and Investigation


4110-12 | Emergency Preparedness - Fire Prevention

A.   Good Housekeeping

  1. Good housekeeping must be practised at all times.
  2. No accumulation of refuse will be allowed in the hallways or stairwells.
  3. Covered metal refuse cans will be used to hold cleaning rags and waxing rags.

 

B.  Routes of Egress

  1. All exit doors will work freely and no exits will be blocked.
  2. Miscellaneous materials, supplies or equipment must not be stored in corridors, electrical rooms or boiler rooms.
  3. Subject to subsection 2.4 below, no decorations will be placed in corridors, stairways or routes of egress unless they are flame proof.
  4. Student work displays will not be considered as decorations; however, because of their flammability, they will only be displayed on tackboards which will meet the required flame spread rating for wall finishing materials in corridors in compliance with the National Building Code of Canada.
  5. Combustible materials such as instructional aids, notices and pupil work may be attached to walls or ceilings in classrooms subject to the following limits:
    • Combustible materials will not cover more than 20% of the area of such walls or ceilings;
    • Combustible materials will not be placed closer than 1000 MM to a doorway; and 
    • The intent of the regulation is to limit exposed combustible material to 20% of each individual surface.

 

C.  Assembly Areas (e.g. halls, gyms, theatres, multi-purpose rooms)

  1. All decorations, hangings, and curtains used in any assembly area will either be of a non-inflammable material or will be flame-proofed. 
  2. No decorations, hangings, or curtains will be installed in such a manner that a space for litter may be formed. 
  3. All decorative materials will be kept not less than six (6) feet above the floor.
  4. All stages and stage settings in halls (gymnasiums/activity rooms) will be of a kind and type CSA approved and no material will be used in any stage setting unless it is non-combustible or unless it has been treated to render it flame proof.

 

D.  Christmas Decorations

  1. The use of real Christmas trees in schools will be kept to a minimum. 
    • Principals and teachers are earnestly requested to consider whether the risks involved in bringing such finely divided, highly combustible material into the schools is worthwhile.
    • Real Christmas trees will be brought into the school as short a time before the last day of school as possible.  They will be removed on the last day of school and stored in the school yard at a safe distance from the school. 
    • If trees are used, they must not be stored in stairwells or on stages or in similar hazardous positions, but must be set up in their final position immediately.
    • The base of the trees will be in a container of water.  Trees will be well supported, away from sources of heat and so placed that, standing or fallen, they cannot block exits.
    • Only LED lights will be placed on the trees.
    • Classroom trees must not exceed four feet in height.

 

     2.  Paper decorations will be kept to a minimum.  They must not be permitted in hallways and, where hung in classrooms, must be kept at least six feet from the floor.  Decorations must be either of a non-inflammable material or suitably flame proofed.

 

E.  Building Plans

  1. A site and floor plan will be prepared for each building.  These plans will be posted throughout the building, and a copy will be provided to each employee and the Fire Chief.  Updated plans, including any structural changes or additions, will be posted and distributed.  The site and floor plans will show:
  • all fire emergency pull stations
  • all firefighting equipment
  • the fire alarm panel
  • mechanical, electrical and furnace/boiler room(s)
  • locations where hazardous materials are stored
  • fire evacuation routes to outside and assembly area
  • fire department connection to building sprinkler system
  • fire hydrant(s) located on or near school
  • location of gas and power shut offs.

 

F.  Classroom Considerations for Evacuation

  1. A teacher may appoint one or more pupils from the class to act as monitors in the event of a fire.  These monitors will check to ensure that no children remain in the classroom or cloakroom or any part thereof.  Upon completion of this check, the monitors will report to the teacher and then take their places with the rest of the class.
  2. If time permits, it is permissible to allow students to take weather-appropriate clothing immediately accessible to them when evacuating;
  3. A student with special needs, who cannot move along the halls at the same pace as their classmates, will be allowed to follow their class at their own, best rate of speed with the assistance of a teacher or education assistant.
  4. If it is determined the safest place for a student with special needs is in the classroom or at a refuge area, the Principal (or person in charge) will be immediately notified of the student’s identity and location so emergency rescue personnel can remove the student safely.

 

G.  Other

  1. No smoking will be allowed in or on school district property at any time.
  2. All drapes and curtains in a school building will be flame proofed.
  3. Boilers and furnaces will be serviced at least twice a year and the venting system will be kept in good order at all times.
  4. Electrical wiring will be regularly maintained and only a qualified electrician will be allowed to extend circuits.
  5. Storage of gasoline
    • In areas specifically provided for mechanical training not more than 5 gallons of gasoline will be stored and all gasoline must be contained in a clearly labelled and approved safety can in accordance with WHMIS regulations.
    •  
    • No gasoline-powered machinery having gasoline in its fuel tank will be stored in the building over night when the area is not supervised.

 

H.  Fire Equipment

  1. Fire Alarms
    • All schools will be protected by alarm systems as specified by the Secretary-Treasurer and approved by the insurance company and the Fire Chief.
    • If the trouble light indicates a defect the Principal will immediately notify the Director of Operations.
  2. Fire Extinguishers
    • Extinguishers of a suitable type will be located in positions as approved by the Fire Chief on shelves or hooks with a red background.
    • These extinguishers will be kept in their proper places and will not be used for any purpose other than firefighting.
    • If a fire extinguisher is used, the Principal will inform the Director of Operations.  The Director of Operations will ensure that the fire extinguisher is recharged or replaced, as necessary.
    • Staff members, including all custodians, will be trained in the use of fire extinguishing equipment.
  3. Sprinklers
    ​The Director of Operations is responsible to ensure that:
    • The alarm system is checked regularly by the Maintenance Department after school hours by arrangement with the Fire Department and a written record of these tests will be kept on a card at the panel.
    • Fire alarm systems will be serviced annually.
    • Fire sprinkler systems will be serviced annually.
    • All fire extinguishers will be checked annually and serviced as necessary.

4110-15 | Emergency Preparedness - Hazardous Material Spill

1.  Community Hazardous Material Spill Response

  • Follow the directions and recommendations from the designated Emergency Coordinator of the City (currently the Fire Chief).
  • Secure school sites (e.g. close windows and doors etc., in cases of airborne contaminates/toxic fumes).
  • Alert all staff to a possible evacuation.
  • Evacuate students and staff only upon direction of the Emergency Coordinator; if the Emergency Coordinator is unavailable evacuate as necessary.
  • Once an evacuation order has been received bring students, staff and visitors to the designated assembly area.  Bring student attendance lists and the visitor log book.
  • Attend to injured personnel or students and call 9-1-1 if required.
  • Follow emergency student release procedures.

 

2.  School-Based Hazardous Material Spill Response

  • Immediately notify the Principal of the spill.
  • The Principal will notify Superintendent
  • The Superintendent will, if there is a risk to the surrounding community, notify the Emergency Coordinator of the City.
  • If toxic fumes are present, secure the area (with caution tape or cones) to prevent other students or personnel from entering.  Evacuate the school, if necessary.
  • Deal with the spill in accordance with the instructions described in the MSDS.
  • Spills must be handled in safe manner, while wearing the proper Personal Protective Equipment.  Ask for the assistance of the City Fire Department if necessary.
  • Call 9-1-1 for medical aid for any students, staff or visitors exposed to the hazardous material.

4110-20 | Emergency Preparedness - Earthquake Response

1. Take Cover

  • If Indoors:
    • Issue the ‘Duck, Cover and Hold’ command to students and visitors.
    • Protect yourself (‘Duck, Cover and Hold’).
    • Immediately face away from windows and take cover under or beside a desk, counter or table, or next to an interior wall
    • Assume ‘Crash Position’ on knees, head down, one hand clasped over neck (or neck/head covered with book or jacket) and one hand holding on to the furniture.
    • Posture must be such that the most vulnerable areas (neck and chest) are protected.
  • Count aloud and in unison with the students for the duration of the earthquake.
  • After the shaking stops stay where you are until you have counted again to 60.
  • If Outdoors:
    • If possible, move away from embankments, trees, power lines and poles, and any other tall structure.
    • Issue the ‘Duck and Cover” command to students and visitors.
    • Protect yourself (‘Duck and Cover’).
      • Immediately face away from windows (if near a building).
      • Assume ‘Crash Position’ on knees, head down, both hands clasped over neck (or neck/head covered with book or jacket.
      • Posture must be such that the most vulnerable areas (neck and chest) are protected.
    • Count aloud and in unison with the students for the duration of the earthquake.
    • After the shaking stops stay where you are until you have counted again to 60.

 

2. Evacuate the Building

  • Teachers will:
    • ensure gas and equipment, if applicable, are shut off unless doing so jeopardizes the employee’s safety;
    • ascertain if it is safe to exit the classroom via the designated evacuation route;
    • if able to exit classroom, direct students to walk, with jackets and shoes on, in a quiet and orderly manner along the evacuation route to the designated assembly area;
    • if an exit route is blocked calmly and firmly lead students to an alternate exit;
    • avoid overhead wires and pipes which may have fallen during the earthquake;
    • activate evacuation plans for any students with special needs;
    • do not delay the evacuation except to reassure the injured or provide life-saving first aid interventions;
    • bring a class list, which includes that day’s attendance;
    • if unable to exit the classroom, have students sit on the floor against an inside wall;
    • if unable to exit the classroom, open exterior window and evacuate if on the ground floor, or call for help through the open window if unable to evacuate.
  • If a secondary earthquake or ‘aftershock’ occurs while leaving the building:
    • students/staff should ‘Squat and Cover’ (place head close to knees, clasp hands behind neck, cover side of head with arms; if cover is available use it or place back against an interior wall).
    • The ‘Duck, Cover and Hold’ procedure is not advised as the ground may be littered with debris (e.g. broken glass) from the initial shock.
    • Count for the duration of the aftershock, then immediately continue evacuation procedures.
  • All employees will ensure that all occupants are able to immediately evacuate the building using the designated evacuation routes to a safe assembly area.
  • Stay away from any fallen power lines.
  • The earthquake kit must be taken to the command post.  Emergency medical forms and supplies will be kept close to or within the earthquake kit.

 

3.  Account for all Occupants

  • Teachers will:
    • immediately take attendance at the assembly area;
    • immediately report any missing students, staff and/or visitors to the command post;
    • apply I.D. information to all primary and injured students; if I.D. tags are missing, write I.D information on children’s foreheads; and
    • if the teacher was outside the building at the time of the earthquake, contact the Principal and advise the Principal of the number and location of students with the teacher and the last known location of any missing students, staff and/or visitors.
  • The Principal will:
    • set up a command post;
    • determine if all students, staff, and visitors have safely exited the school building(s); and
    • inform fire department officials immediately upon their attendance of names and ages of unaccounted for students, staff, visitors and their possible location in the building, including any injured or trapped persons, or students with special needs, waiting for assistance to be removed from the building.
  • All building occupants will remain outside the building until the Principal or designate announces that it is safe to reenter.
  • If it is impossible or unsafe to return to the school building, follow emergency student release procedures.
  • Students must wait to be reunited with parents or guardians through the Student Release Station; keep accurate records of students released. If there are any students remaining after school hours, they must be accommodated at the school or at an identified Evacuation Reception Centre.

 

4.  Situation Management

  • The Principal will attempt to confirm the location(s) of damage in the facility, to advise the responding fire department.
  • In a major quake await instructions from emergency officials over a battery-operated or car radio.
  • Teachers will:
    • remind students that parents may be delayed in calling for them; and
    • encourage students to talk about their anxieties and fears.
  • The Principal will:
    • oversee first aid, if necessary;
    • ensure all entrances to school property are open and not blocked;
    • disconnect utilities and equipment unless doing so jeopardizes employee safety; and
    • stand by and be of assistance to fire department officials, as needed.
  • Oversee conservation and distribution of uncontaminated water, as well as preparation of emergency facilities.
    • Discard any food items that may have been contaminated, when in doubt throw it out!
    • Do not use water that may be contaminated for washing, cleaning, drinking, or food preparation.
  • All media queries regarding an earthquake will be handled through the office of the Superintendent, in consultation with the local fire department.

4110-22 | Emergency Preparedness - Earthquake Preparations

1.  Response Plan

  • Each school Principal is to develop a Response Plan that contains the key elements as outlined on page 21 of the "School Earthquake Safety Guidebook"
  • The Principal will ensure that teachers are familiar with page 20 of the "Guidebook" and that drills and instruction take place.
  • The Principal will ensure that there is a "Chain of Command" that can implement the Response Plan in his or her absence.

2.  Hazard Reduction

  • Each Principal will review his or her building for potential safety hazards.  A guide for this is the "Guidebook for Developing a School Earthquake Safety Program", page 13.  The Principal will devise a short and long term Hazard Reduction Plan in consultation with the Director of Operations for correcting the hazards.

3.  Classroom Considerations for Evacuation

  • Teachers must immediately take steps to protect themselves and prevent personal injury during an earthquake. Teachers have an extremely important role to play in assisting students through the post-earthquake recovery stage.
  • A teacher may appoint one or more pupils from the class to act as monitors in the event of an earthquake.  These monitors will check to ensure that no children remain in the classroom or cloakroom or any part thereof.  Upon completion of this check, the monitors will report to the teacher and then take their places with the rest of the class.  These monitors may also be trained to give instructions in the event the teacher is injured;
  • It is expected that students will take weather-appropriate clothing when evacuating;
  • A student with special needs who cannot move along the halls at the same pace as their classmates, will be allowed to follow the class at their own, best rate of speed with the assistance of a teacher or education assistant.
  • If it is determined the safest place for a student with special needs is in the classroom or at a refuge area the Principal (or person in charge) will be immediately notified of the student’s identity and location so emergency rescue personnel can remove the student safely.
  • Seriously injured persons may have to be left behind for the school’s designated search and rescue team. Provide verbal reassurance and inform them that search and rescue is coming. Provide any lifesaving first aid intervention and protective cover if possible.

4.  District Responsibilities

  • The district will participate in any community-wide planning and preparation activities and establish district-wide procedures in conjunction with community agencies and organizations.

4110-25 | Emergency Preparedness - Landslide or Mudslide Response

A.  Take Cover

  1.   IF INDOORS
    • Find cover in the part of the building that is furthest away from the approaching landslide.
    • Take shelter under a strong table, bench, counter, desk, etc.
    • Hold on firmly and stay put until all movement has stopped.
  2.   IF OUTDOORS
    • Move quickly away from the likely path of the landslide or mudslide, keeping clear of embankments, trees, power lines and poles.
    • Stay away from the landslide area. The slope may experience additional failures for hours to days afterwards.

 

B.  Evacuate the Building

The decision to evacuate the building after a landslide or mudslide is dependent on the condition of the building and conditions outside the building. The Principal will normally contact the fire department and follow their advice; however if there is concern with the stability of the building the Principal will seek the safest way to evacuate the building. If you smell natural or propane gas or hear a hissing noise, evacuate your building immediately and call 9-1-1. When a decision has been made to evacuate:

  Teachers will:

  • Ensure gas and equipment,
  • ascertain if it is safe to exit the classroom via the designated evacuation route;
  • if able to exit classroom as planned, direct students to walk, with jackets and shoes on, in a quiet and orderly manner along the evacuation route to the designated assembly area;
  • if an exit route is blocked calmly and firmly lead students to an alternate exit;
  • avoid overhead wires which may have fallen during the landslide or mudslide;
  • activate evacuation plans for any students with special needs;
  • do not delay the evacuation except to reassure the injured or provide life-saving first aid interventions;
  • bring a class list, which includes that day’s attendance;
  • if unable to exit the classroom, have students sit on the floor against an inside wall;
  • if unable to exit the classroom, contact the Principal and seek further instruction.

   > All employees will ensure that all occupants are able to immediately evacuate the building using the designated evacuation routes to a safe assembly area.

   > Stay away from any fallen power lines.

   > The earthquake kit must be taken to the command post. Emergency medical forms and supplies will be kept close to or within the earthquake kit.

 

C.  Account for all Occupants

  1.   Teachers will:
    • immediately take attendance at the assembly area;
    • immediately report any missing students, staff and/or visitors to the command post; and
    • apply I.D. information to all primary and injured students; if I.D. tags are missing,
    • write I.D information on children’s foreheads.
  2.   The Principal will:
    • set up a command post;
    • determine if all students, staff, and visitors have safely exited the school building(s);
    • and
    • inform fire department officials immediately upon their attendance of names and ages of unaccounted for students, staff, visitors and their possible location in the building, including any injured or trapped persons, or students with special needs, waiting for assistance to be removed from the building.
  3.   All building occupants will remain outside the building until the Principal or designate announces that it is safe to reenter.
  4.   If it is impossible or unsafe to return to the school building, follow emergency student release procedures.
  5.   Students must wait to be reunited with parents or guardians through the Student Release Station; keep accurate records of students released. If there are any students remaining after school hours, they must be accommodated at the school or at an identified Evacuation Reception Centre.

 

D.  Situation Management

  1.   The Principal will attempt to confirm the location(s) of damage in the facility, to advise the responding fire department.
  2.   In a major landslide or mudslide await instructions from emergency officials over battery-operated or car radio.
  3.   Teachers will:
    • remind students that parents may be delayed in calling for them; and
    • encourage students to talk about their anxieties and fears.
  4.   The Principal will:
    • oversee first aid, if necessary;
    • ensure all entrances to school property are open and not blocked;
    • disconnect utilities and equipment unless doing so jeopardizes employee safety; and
    • stand by and be of assistance to fire department officials, as needed.
  5.   Oversee conservation and distribution of uncontaminated water, as well as preparation of emergency facilities.
    • Discard any food items that may have been contaminated, when in doubt throw it out!
    • Do not use water that may be contaminated for washing, cleaning, drinking, or food preparation.
  6.   All media queries regarding a landslide or mudslide will be handled through the office of the Superintendent, in consultation with the local fire department.

 

4110      Emergency Preparedness
4110-90 Emergency Preparedness - Emergency Drills


4110-30 | Emergency Preparedness - Tsunami Response

In the event of a tsunami you ideally want to be at least 3.2 km (2 miles) away from shore and at least 30.5 meters (100 ft) above sea level. Tsunami’s bring many surge waves that can last for hours, arriving every ten to sixty minutes.  Tsunami’s usually affect communities close to where the earthquake or other triggering event occurred.  Locally generated tsunamis can strike the shore minutes after they are generated, before official warnings can transmit from warning centers to local warning systems.  In rare cases tsunamis can travel across open ocean and strike communities thousands of miles away, hours after they are generated.  In these cases there is time to warn the residents of those communities.

 

A Tsunami is imminent if you experience any of the following:

  • A strong earthquake shaking, particularly shaking lasting longer than 30 seconds;
  • Withdrawal of the sea water to unusually low levels; or
  • Loud sound or roar from the ocean, similar to a jet plane, an explosion or a sudden downpour of rain.

What to do:

  • Complete the evacuation of the school as set out in Regulation No. 4110-20 Emergency Preparedness – Earthquake Response.
  • Gather students and move children as quickly as possible to the highest ground available. See evacuation route for your school.

Tsunami Preparation:

  • The Principal at Hartley Bay will develop and practice an Evacuation Plan for tsunami warnings.
  • The Principal at Hartley Bay will be familiar with the Provincial Emergency Program including:
    • how tsunami warnings are given.
    • how to call for help.
    • availability of emergency supplies.

Field Trips

Note that shorefront areas of Prince Rupert and Port Edward are in the Tsunami zone.  If a class outing is in these areas when the warning signs of a tsunami are observed, classes must immediately move as quickly as possible to higher ground.


4110-35 | Emergency Preparedness - Flood Response

PRMS is the only school in a potential flood plain.   The school will endeavor to ensure that parents of children are able to come and get their children.  If that is not possible, staff must stay with students until authorized parents or guardians can take responsibility for the students.

1.  Take Cover

  • If Indoors:
    • Move to the highest floor in the building. When flooding has stopped or has receded enough to make evacuation feasible, stay where you are and wait for instructions from the fire department.
  • If Outdoors:
    • Stay away from swollen streams and rivers –  moving waters can sweep you away, even if you are in a vehicle.
    • Move students to higher ground closest to the area you find yourselves in.
    • Remain in an area where you and the students are visible and safe, and wait for the fire department for rescue.

2.  Evacuate the Building

The decision to evacuate the building after the flood is dependent on the condition of the building and conditions outside the building.  The Principal will normally contact the fire department and follow their advice; however if there is concern with the stability of the building the Principal will seek the safest way to evacuate the building.  If you smell natural or propane gas or hear a hissing noise, evacuate your building immediately and call 9-1-1.  When a decision has been made to evacuate:

  • Teachers will:
    • ensure gas and equipment, if applicable, are shut off unless doing so jeopardizes the employee’s safety;
    • ascertain if it is safe to exit the classroom via the designated evacuation route;
    • if able to exit classroom, direct students to walk, with jackets and shoes on, in a quiet and orderly manner along the evacuation route to the designated assembly area;
    • if an exit route is blocked calmly and firmly lead students to an alternate exit;
    • avoid overhead wires and pipes which may have fallen during the flood;
    • activate evacuation plans for any students with special needs;
    • do not delay the evacuation except to reassure the injured or provide life-saving first aid interventions;
    • bring a class list, which includes that day’s attendance;
    • if unable to exit the classroom, have students sit on the floor against an inside wall;
    • if unable to exit the classroom, contact the Principal and seek further instruction.
  • All employees will ensure that all occupants are able to immediately evacuate the building using the designated evacuation routes to a safe assembly area.
  • Stay away from any fallen power lines.
  • The earthquake kit must be taken to the command post.  Emergency medical forms and supplies will be kept close to or within the earthquake kit.

3.  Account for all Occupants

  • Teachers will:
    • immediately take attendance at the assembly area;
    • immediately report any missing students, staff and/or visitors to the command post; and
    • apply I.D. information to all primary and injured students; if I.D. tags are missing, write I.D information on children’s foreheads.
    • if the teacher was outside the building at the time of the flood, contact the Principal and advise the Principal of the number and location of students with the teacher and the last known location of any missing students, staff and/or visitors.
  • The Principal will:
    • set up a command post;
    • determine if all students, staff, and visitors have safely exited the school building(s); and
    • inform fire department officials immediately upon their attendance of names and ages of unaccounted for students, staff, visitors and their possible location in the building, including any injured or trapped persons, or students with special needs, waiting for assistance to be removed from the building.
  • All building occupants will remain outside the building until the Principal or designate announces that it is safe to reenter.
  • If it is impossible or unsafe to return to the school building, follow emergency student release procedures.
  • Students must wait to be reunited with parents or guardians through the Student Release Station; keep accurate records of students released. If there are any students remaining after school hours, they must be accommodated at the school or at an identified Evacuation Reception Centre.

4.  Situation Management

  • The Principal will attempt to confirm the location(s) of damage in the facility, to advise the responding fire department.
  • In a major flood await instructions from emergency officials over a battery-operated or car radio.
  • Teachers will:
    • remind students that parents may be delayed in calling for them; and
    • encourage students to talk about their anxieties and fears.
  • The Principal will:
    • oversee first aid, if necessary;
    • ensure all entrances to school property are open and not blocked;
    • disconnect utilities and equipment unless doing so jeopardizes employee safety; and
    • stand by and be of assistance to fire department officials, as needed.
  • Oversee conservation and distribution of uncontaminated water, as well as preparation of emergency facilities.
    • Discard any food items that may have been in contact with flood waters, when in doubt throw it out!
    • Do not use water that may be contaminated for washing, cleaning, drinking, or food preparation.
  • All media queries regarding a flood will be handled through the office of the Superintendent, in consultation with the local fire department.

 

4110       Emergency Preparedness
4110-90  Emergency Preparedness - Emergency Drills


4110-40 | Emergency Preparedness - Hold and Secure

Hold and Secure is used when it is desirable to secure the school due to an emergency situation occurring outside the school and not related to the school.

Hold and Secure procedures

  • The Principal or designate will order and announce “Hold and Secure” procedures.  Repeat announcement several times.  Be direct. Code words lead to confusion.  If it is a drill, announce it as a Practice Drill.
  • Classes that are outside the building should enter the building. Persons within the school not affiliated to the school will also become part of the procedure if it is initiated.
  • All exterior doors will be locked and monitored to allow students who are outside to re-enter.
  • A sign will be posted on the front door advising visitors that the school is in a “Hold and Secure” situation.  The non-emergency number to the Prince Rupert RCMP Detachment will also be provided.
  • Clear hallways, restrooms and other rooms that cannot be secured.
  • Pull shades, keep students away from windows.
  • Turn off cell phones.
  • Do not use in-house phone systems as the lines must be kept clear for emergency calls.
  • Control all movement, but continue classes.  Depending on the situation, dismissal bells may need to be ignored.
  • Move on announcement only.
  • Principal or designate will announce “all clear”.

4110-42 | Emergency Preparedness - Intruder Lockdown

Intruder Lockdown is used when it is necessary to lockdown the school due to a serious and immediate threat in the school.  Anyone observing a threat or serious potential threat must contact the office immediately to initiate the lockdown (initiating the lockdown is the first priority).

Intruder Lockdown procedures (these actions happen rapidly)

  • The principal or designate will order and announce “Activate Lockdown Now”.
  • Repeat announcement several times.  If it is a drill, announce it as a Practice Drill. 
  • If this is NOT a drill, a call will be placed to 9-1-1.
  • If safety permits, immediately direct all students, staff and visitors to the nearest classroom or secure space.
  • Classes that are outside of the building should not enter the building.  Move outside classes to primary evacuation site or an alternate location if possible.
  • Lock classroom doors and barricade if possible.
  • Leave exterior doors “as is” – do not approach them.
  • Move people away from windows and doors.  Close and lock all windows and pull curtains or shades.
  • Turn off lights.
  • Keep out of sight.
  • Remain silent.
  • Ignore dismissal bells.
  • If fire alarms should be activated during a lockdown, students and staff shall not respond as they normally would.  Remain locked down if safe to do so.  Use critical thinking skills.  Be prepared to react if necessary should fire or smoke be detected.
  • Cell phones are not to be used except to communicate pertinent information to emergency services.  Cell phones should be put in silent mode so communication can be transmitted.
  • DO NOT respond to anyone at the door until “all clear” is announced.
  • Notify the Superintendent or other Board Office Staff at the emergency phone number:
    250-624-5911 (if possible).
  • Board Office Staff will send a message to itinerant employees advising them not to go to the school.
  • The Principal or designate will announce “all clear” only after the police have advised that it is safe to do so.
  • The RCMP will check in with every classroom.  Once the RCMP have deemed all classrooms safe the “All Clear” will be announced and further instructions will follow.

4110-50 | Emergency Preparedness - Bomb Threat Response

1.  Receive Threat Details

  • The person receiving the phone call / threat will:
    • Be calm, be courteous, LISTEN and DO NOT interrupt the caller.
    • Obtain as much information as possible.  (See attached “FORM 4110-45A BOMB THREAT PROCEDURE CHECKLIST”).   This checklist should be duplicated and kept by the phone to record data.
    • Initiate call display / call trace action as appropriate to the school's phone system.
    • Complete “FORM 4110-45A BOMB THREAT PROCEDURE CHECKLIST”.
    • Contact RCMP using 9-1-1.  The Fire Department will also receive this information and they will arrive and be on "standby status".
    • Contact the Principal and give them the completed “FORM 4110-45A BOMB THREAT PROCEDURE CHECKLIST”.
  • The Principal will:
    • Review details of the bomb threat call, and pay particular attention to details regarding placement and the time the caller indicated the bomb was set to detonate.
    • Confirm that the RCMP has been contacted.
    • If a suspicious or unusual object or package is found, DO NOT TOUCH IT: police have bomb squad specialists.  Do not assume there is only one bomb.
    • Notify the Superintendent or other Board Office Staff at the emergency phone number:
      250-624-5911 (if possible).
    • Board Office Staff will send a message to itinerant employees advising them not to go to the school.

 

2.  Evacuate the Building

Evaluate how best to evacuate based on information gained.  If a suspicious package is suspected or located, ask the appropriate teachers to use an alternate evacuation route away from the package before using the fire alarm bell.  Evacuate school by using the fire alarm bell or going to classrooms and asking each teacher to follow fire drill procedures.

  • Teachers will:
    • ensure gas and equipment, if applicable, are shut off unless doing so jeopardizes the employee’s safety;
    • ascertain if it is safe to exit the classroom via the designated evacuation route;
    • if able to exit classroom, direct students to walk, with jackets and shoes on, in a quiet and orderly manner along the evacuation route to the designated assembly area;
    • if an exit route is blocked calmly and firmly lead students to an alternate exit;
    • activate evacuation plans for any students with special needs;
    • bring a class list, which includes that day’s attendance;
    • if unable to exit the classroom, have students sit on the floor against an outside wall;
    • if unable to exit the classroom, contact the Principal for further instructions.
  • All employees will ensure that all occupants are able to immediately evacuate the building using the designated evacuation routes to a safe assembly area.
  • The earthquake kit must be taken to the command post.  Emergency medical forms and supplies will be kept close to or within the earthquake kit.

 

3.  Account for all Occupants

  • Teachers will:
    • immediately take attendance at the assembly area;
    • immediately report any missing students, staff and/or visitors to the command post;
    • apply I.D. information to all primary and injured students; if I.D. tags are missing, write I.D information on children’s foreheads; and
    • if a teacher was outside the building at the time of the evacuation, contact the Principal and advise the Principal of the number and location of students with the teacher and the last known location of any missing students, staff and/or visitors.
  • The Principal will:
    • set up a command post;
    • determine if all students, staff, and visitors have safely exited the school building(s); and
    • inform fire department officials immediately upon their attendance of names and ages of unaccounted for students, staff, visitors and their possible location in the building, including any injured or trapped persons, or students with special needs, waiting for assistance to be removed from the building.
  • All building occupants will remain outside the building until the Principal or designate announces that it is safe to reenter.
  • If it is unlikely students will return to the school building before the end of classes, follow emergency student release procedures.
  • Students must wait to be reunited with parents or guardians through the Student Release Station; keep accurate records of students released. If there are any students remaining after school hours, they must be accommodated at the school or at an identified Evacuation Reception Centre.

 

4.  Situation Management

  • Teachers will:
    • remind students that parents may be delayed in calling for them; and
    • encourage students to talk about their anxieties and fears.
  • The Principal will:
    • oversee first aid, if necessary;
    • ensure all entrances to school property are open and not blocked;
    • disconnect utilities and equipment unless doing so jeopardizes employee safety; and
    • stand by and be of assistance to fire department officials, as needed.
  • Principals, staff volunteers and custodial volunteers will meet the RCMP near the front (main) entrance of the school to receive instructions regarding extended search procedures.  (Note: employees have the right to refuse to participate in a bomb search.)
  • Oversee conservation and distribution of uncontaminated water, as well as preparation of emergency facilities.
  • All media queries regarding an earthquake will be handled through the office of the Superintendent, in consultation with the local fire department.

 

4110      Emergency Preparedness Policy
4110-40  Emergency Preparedness - Hold and Secure
4110-42  Emergency Preparedness - Intruder Lockdown
4110-52  Emergency Preparedness - Bomb Threat Preparations
4110-90  Emergency Preparedness - Emergency Drills


4110-50A | Bomb Threat Procedure Checklist - Form

Reference Title View

Bomb Threat Checklist Form

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4110-52 | Emergency Preparedness - Bomb Threat Preparations

1.  Application to Hartley Bay School

  • The Principal of Hartley Bay school will apply Regulation 4110-50 Emergency Preparedness - Bomb Threat Procedure as appropriate for the school and community.

 

2.  Other Considerations

  • During the search procedure and evacuation it is important to
    MAINTAIN CALM AUTHORITY - DO NOT ALARM STUDENTS AND STAFF.
  • Prepare personnel in advance for the possibility of a bomb threat call.  Rehearse procedures.
  • If a bomb threat is received the school will be evacuated.  This automatic response may be re-evaluated in consultation with the Superintendent if there has been a series of bomb threats.
  • News media, if they seek information, will be asked not to give the event "coverage" as such prominence may encourage further threats.  (Media will often be very helpful in this regard.)  Direct media enquiries to the Superintendent or other Board Office spokesperson.
  • For the same reason, no mention of a "bomb threat" should be made to the students during or after the incident.

 

4110       Emergency Preparedness
4110-50   Emergency Preparedness - Bomb Threat Response
4110-90   Emergency Preparedness - Emergency Drills


4110-60 | Emergency Preparedness - Medical Emergency Response

Call medical emergency phone number 9-1-1 for

  • Ambulance and
  • Fire Department.

Provide the following Information:

  1. Nature of medical emergency;
  2. Location of emergency (address, building, room number); and
  3. Your name and the phone number from which you are calling.

Do not move an injured person unless absolutely necessary.

 

If the injured person is an employee, call the school First Aid Attendant.

If the injured person is a student or member of the public, call the school First Aid Attendant only if it is a life-threatening injury.

 

Name:_______________________ Phone:_________________

Name:_______________________ Phone:_________________

 

If the First Aid Attendant is not available attempt, as a minimum, to provide the following assistance:

  1. Stop the bleeding with firm pressure on the wounds (note: avoid contact with blood or other bodily fluids).
  2. In case of choking clear the air passages using Abdominal Thrusts.

If the injured person is a student, call the parent or guardian.

Refer to 4310-40 Incident Reporting and Investigation Decision Tree to identify the appropriate procedures to follow after the injured person has been aided.

NOTE:
These procedure are directed to any teacher who witnesses or is informed about an accident or illness which requires emergency action.  The first procedure (call 9-1-1) must be completed immediately.  If you need additional assistance use the P.A. and ask for any staff member who has first aid qualifications.  The Principal should be notified as early as possible but in no way should this notification interfere with the immediate implementation of 1, 2 or 3 above.

 

 

Related Policies and Regulations:

4110              Emergency Preparedness Policy
4110-90         Emergency Preparedness – Emergency Drills Regulation
4230-10         Ambulance Service Regulation
4310-40         Incident Reporting and Investigation Decision Tree


4110-62 | Emergency Preparedness - Vehicle Accident Response

Call the emergency phone number 9-1-1 for

  • Police,
  • Ambulance and
  • Fire Department.

Provide the following Information:

  1. Nature of accident and any medical emergency;
  2. Location of emergency (nearby address or nearest intersection); and
  3. Your name and the phone number from which you are calling.

Do not move any injured person unless absolutely necessary

If a First Aid Attendant is available, have them provide first aid to any injured person.

If a First Aid Attendant is not available attempt, as a minimum, to provide the following assistance:

  1. Stop the bleeding with firm pressure on the wounds (note: avoid contact with blood or other bodily fluids).
  2. In case of choking clear the air passages using Abdominal Thrusts.

As soon as possible, advise the principal of the accident.  The principal will confirm details of the incident and contact the parents or guardians of students involved in the accident.

It is important for the teacher or principal in charge of the trip to keep records of the location of all students, including any students transported for medical attention.

Record the details of all vehicles and any pedestrians involved in the accident, e.g. vehicle descriptions, license plate numbers, driver name(s) and license number(s).

If a school district vehicle is damaged, contact the Director of Operations.

Ensure the incident is reported to the School Protection Program.

 

4110      Emergency Preparedness Policy
4110-90  Emergency Prepareness - Emergency Drills
4310-40  Emergency Preparedness - Incident Reporting and Investigation
 


4110-65 | Emergency Preparedness - Extended Power or Natural Gas Outage

School Closures and Early Dismissal

If there is a loss of heat or power during the school day, the Principal will:

  • Consult with the Director of Operations to confirm the expected duration of the outage; and
  • If the outage is expected to last more than 1 hour, consult with the Superintendent to determine if the school should implement early dismissal.

 

All Decisions About School Closures Will Be Made By The Superintendent.

 

Facility Precautions

In the event of an extended power loss to a facility or to the district certain precautionary measures should be taken depending on the geographical location and environment of the facility.

(Please note: It is unusual but not impossible for the temperatures in Prince Rupert and surrounding areas to go below freezing. There have been documented landslides in the past 10 years that cut off power to Prince Rupert and Port Edward for more than 7 days.)

  • Unnecessary electrical equipment and appliances should be turned off and unplugged to avoid power restoration causing surge damage to electronics and affecting sensitive equipment.

In the event of freezing temperatures, the Operations Department will ensure building systems and infrastructure are monitored and protected as necessary, paying particular attention to systems and equipment that may be damaged by freezing temperatures.

 

Upon restoration of heat and power:

  • Electronic equipment should be brought up to ambient temperatures before energizing to prevent condensate forming on circuitry.
  • The Operations Department will check fire and potable water piping for leaks from freeze damage after the heat has been restored to the facility and before water is turned back on.

4110-90 | Emergency Preparedness - Emergency Drills

1.  Fire drill and evacuation procedures will be established in each school and work site.

1.2  Drill procedures will include:

  • The drill will follow, as closely as possible, Regulation 4110-10 Emergency Preparedness – Fire Response.
  • Fire procedure plans for students with special needs that may interfere with their safe exit will be devised by the Principal and approved by the Fire Chief.
  • Teachers will be instructed how to use the break-glass station, provide for the disabled, and confine and control small fires.
  • The fire department must be phoned (250-627-1248) 24 hours before holding a fire drill and just before the drill.
  • Evacuation will be quiet, orderly and purposeful.
  • Procedures will include reporting to the command post.
  • The Principal will keep a record of when fire drills have taken place.

1.3  In accordance with the BC Fire Code, fire drills will be held as follows:

  • For schools:
    • one drill prior to September 30;
    • two drills between September 30 and January 31; and
    • three drills between January 31 and June 30.
    • The district recommends that one drill each year be held during a lunch break or other break.
    • If a school evacuation is included as part of another drill (for example, an earthquake drill) it may be counted as one of the required fire drills.
    • For all other sites, one drill per year.

1.4  Students will be encouraged to review and practice fire evacuation procedures in their homes.

 

2.  Earthquake Drills

2.1 Earthquake drill and evacuation procedures will be established in each school and work site.

2.2 Before participating in earthquake drills, students should receive a thorough explanation of what is expected of them.  The person giving the instructions should emphasize that, while the ground is shaking, students will be safest by finding immediate shelter under desks, tables, counters, etc. to avoid falling objects.  The instructor should also note the noise and disorder that will accompany an earthquake, and emphasize that a calm, quiet response by teachers and students is essential.

2.3 Drill procedures will include:

  • The drill will follow, as closely as possible, Regulation 4110-20 Emergency Preparedness – Earthquake Response.
  • Earthquake procedure plans for students with special needs that may interfere with their safe exit will be devised by the Principal and approved by the Fire Chief.
  • The fire department should be phoned (250-627-1248) 24 hours before holding an earthquake drill.
  • Evacuation will be quiet, orderly and purposeful.
  • Procedures will include reporting to the command post.
  • The Principal will keep a record of when drills have taken place.

2.4 Earthquake drills will be held at least three times per year.

  • The first drill must be completed prior to September 30.
  • The second drill will be scheduled for all schools in the district at the time and date of the “Great British Columbia Shake-Out” – normally in mid-October.
  • The third drill must be completed prior to March 31.

2.5 Students will be encouraged to review and practice earthquake evacuation procedures in their homes.

 

3.  Hold and Secure, Intruder Lockdown Drills

3.1 Hold and Secure, and Intruder Lockdown, procedures will be established in each school and work site

3.2 Before participating in Hold and Secure, and Intruder Lockdown, drills students should receive a thorough explanation of what is expected of them.  The person giving the instructions should emphasize the importance of staying quiet and out of sight of windows and doors.  Ensuring cell phones are turned off must be emphasized.

3.3 Drill procedures will include:

  • The drill will follow, as closely as possible, Regulation 4110-20 Emergency Preparedness – Earthquake Response.
  • Hold and Secure, and Intruder Lockdown, plans for students with special needs will be devised by the Principal and reviewed by the Police Inspector.
  • The police department should be phoned (250-624-2136) 24 hours before holding a Hold and Secure, or Intruder Lockdown, drill.
  • The Principal will keep a record of when drills have taken place.

3.4 Hold and Secure, and Intruder Lockdown, drills will be held at least once per year.

 

4.   Other Emergency Drills

4.1  Other potential emergency scenarios may or may not apply to individual schools.  Principals will use their discretion to determine if other drills will be carried out.  Drills for other scenarios will follow the pattern set out in this regulation.

 

RELATED

4110      Emergency Preparedness Policy
4110-10 Emergency Preparedness - Fire Drills
4110-12 Emergency Preparedness - Fire Prevention
4110-15 Emergency Preparedness - Hazardous Material Spill
4110-20 Emergency Preparedness - Earthquake Reponse
4110-22 Emergency Preparedness - Earthquake Preparations
4110-30 Emergency Preparedness - Tsunami Warnings
4110-35 Emergency Preparedness - Flood Response
4110-40 Emergency Preparedness - Hold and Secure
4110-42 Emergency Preparedness - Intruder Lockdown
4110-50 Emergency Preparedness - Bomb Threat Procedure
4110-52 Emergency Preparedness - Bomb Threat Preparations
4110-60 Emergency Preparedness - Medical Emergency Response
4110-62 Emergency Preparedness - Vhicle Accident Response
4110-65 Emergency Preparedness - Extended Power or Natural Gas Outage


4210-20 | Weapons

The possession or use of any weapon is a serious threat to the school environment and to the safety of both students and staff. Weapons are prohibited from school property except as authorized by school regulations. All school personnel, who believe an unauthorized weapon is present on school property are directed to take appropriate action as outlined in this regulation to ensure the safety of both students and staff.

The definition of a weapon is:

  1. anything that is used, that is intended to be used, or is designed to put someone in fear;
  2. anything used or intended for use in causing death or injury to persons whether designed for that purpose or not; or,
  3. anything used or intended for use of threatening or intimidating any person, and, without restricting the generality of the foregoing, includes any firearm as defined in Section 84 of the Criminal Code.

 

Authorization of Weapons:

Weapons are prohibited from school property except as follows:

  1. Peace Officers possessing weapons when attending on school property in connection with their duties;
  2. When a weapon is desired to be present in a class for an educational purpose; and,
  3. In accordance with the exceptions for religious beliefs set out below.

Any weapon which is desired to be in a classroom for an educational purpose must be approved in advance by the Principal. Absent pre-approval, it is not authorized. This includes, for example, the construction of a knife or other item which might be considered to be a weapon as part of an applied skills class. If a student desires to make such an article as a project, pre-approval by the Principal is required. The Principal will instruct the teacher of any special security arrangements that are required. 

 

Administrative Procedures:

  1. When a Principal reasonably believes that any person on school premises:
    • possesses an unauthorized weapon on his or her person or in any other place, or
    • uses a weapon for the purposes of intimidation or assault,

the Principal will either

  1. encourage the peaceful relinquishment of the weapon: or
  2. follow Regulation 4110-42: Emergency Preparedness – Intruder Lockdown.

 

Reporting Procedures:

After the Principal has ensured the safety of students and staff the Principal:

  1. Shall, as soon as is practicable, notify the parent or guardian of any child involved in the situation.
  2. Shall make an oral report of the situation immediately to the Superintendent, or designate.
  3. *May, as soon as is practicable, file a written report to the Superintendent of Schools. Every effort should be made to include appropriate details, processes and the evidence gathered all of which may be required to support charges.

*Note:  Distinction should be maintained between possession and use of a weapon. The "May" in (c) above will become "Shall" for the use of a weapon.

 

 The possession of any weapon by a student is a serious threat to the school environment and to the safety of both students and staff. The Principal may suspend any student in possession of or utilizing a weapon for up to five days. Notwithstanding a possible suspension, the student may also be required to attend a meeting with the District Discipline Committee.

 

School Code of Conduct:

This district Regulation relating to weapons shall be part of the Code of Conduct of all Prince Rupert School District schools.

 

Exceptions for Religious Beliefs:

Where a parent or guardian wishes their child to wear at school a religious symbol which falls within the definition of a "weapon," the following process must be followed:

  1. The parent or guardian must obtain official authorization from the Superintendent of Schools for their child or children to wear such "symbols" at school. If a parent or guardian establishes a bonafide religious basis for the wearing of such a "symbol," then authorization will be given.
  2. In cases where a student arrives at school with a religious symbol (potential weapon), without official authorization, the Principal will immediately contact the parents or guardians and request that:
    • the religious symbol be surrendered, or
    • the student return home until official authorization has been obtained from the Superintendent of Schools.
  3. In cases where any child insists upon wearing a "symbol" without having obtained prior official authorization from the Superintendent of Schools, the Principal will send the student home, advise the parents or guardians of the reasons and request a meeting with the parents or guardians.

Note:     Authorization to wear such a symbol, applies to a specific article and the Superintendent may, as a condition of granting approval, require that the article be as minimally dangerous or threatening as is consistent with the religious beliefs.

 

REFERENCES

4110 - - Emergency Preparedness Policy

4110-42 – Emergency Preparedness – Intruder Lockdown Regulation


4220-10 | Smoke Free Environment

In compliance with Section 2.2 of the Tobacco Control Act smoking is prohibited by all parents, staff, students and visitors anywhere on school property at any time, whether or not school is in session. This prohibition applies to school buildings, parking lots, sports fields, driveways, courtyards, and private vehicles in school parking lots. It applies to school vehicles, wherever they may be at any time.

Anyone contravening the legislation can be fined in accordance with the provisions of the legislation.

The smoking ban is in effect 24 hours a day, seven days a week, and applies to anyone present on School District property, in School District buildings and vehicles and at school and district sponsored activities.

For purposes of this policy, "smoking" means all combustive uses of tobacco, including cigars, cigarettes, pipes and e-cigarettes.

References:

Tobacco Control Act


4230-10 | Ambulance Service

When emergency ambulance service is required, refer to 4110-60 Emergency Preparedness – Medical Emergency Regulation.

In the case of accidents in schools resulting in injuries where a student has to be transferred to the hospital by ambulance, the Board will accept the cost of the ambulance call.

In the case of accidents in schools resulting in injuries where an employee has to be transferred to the hospital by ambulance, the Board will normally be billed for the ambulance call and will accept the cost of the ambulance call.

If an ambulance is called for a student or an employee for a health-related emergency not related to an accident, the Board will not be responsible for the cost of the ambulance call.

Refer to 4310-40 Incident Reporting and Investigation Decision Tree to identify the appropriate procedures to follow after the injured person has been aided.

 

References:
4110-60         Emergency Preparedness – Medical Emergency Regulation
4310-40         Incident Reporting and Investigation Decision Tree


4230-20 | Accident Prevention in Schools

  1. The safety and physical welfare of the student must always be of prime consideration to the Principal and teachers in each school. Areas that must be considered include safety in halls, classrooms, gymnasiums, laboratories, shops and on the playground.
  2. Supervision of students must be provided during regular school hours and during other school functions (non-instructional hours, e.g. extracurricular activities).
  3. Every reasonable step shall be taken to prevent accidents in schools. Custodians, teachers and principals should be constant and thorough in their attention to equipment and to the buildings and school grounds so that unsafe equipment is not used and that unsafe conditions are immediately reported.
  4. The correction of unsafe conditions in buildings or on school grounds shall be given immediate priority by the principal, who will inform the Operations Department. 

4230-30 | First Aid Attendant

  1. First aid kits must be checked frequently and replenished when necessary.
  2. At Prince Rupert Middle School and Charles Hays Secondary School, a Dressing Room must be maintained in accordance with WorkSafe BC requirements.
  3. The first aid qualifications of all school staff should be known to the Principal. 
  4. First Aid attendants shall be appointed in each school to meet the requirements of WorkSafe BC.
  5. First Aid records must be maintained at the school in accordance with WorkSafe BC requirements.

 

References:

WorkSafe BC Regulations and Guidelines

4230-10 – Ambulance Service Regulation

4310 – Occupational Health and Safety Policy 

4310-40 – Incident Reporting and Investigation Decision Tree 

4310-41 – WorkSafe BC Injury Reporting and Investigation Regulation


4310 | Occupational Health and Safety Policy

The Board is committed to providing a safe and healthy workplace for all employees. 

To achieve this, the district administrative staff will establish and maintain an Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) Program that is consistent with Workers Compensation Board Legislation and WorkSafe BC Regulations and is designed to prevent injuries and disease. The OH&S Program will also incorporate regulations to prevent and address violence and workplace bullying and harassment. 

The Board will provide the requisite training programs to ensure that all administrative and supervisory personnel are aware of WorkSafe BC safety and health requirements and that they understand their roles and responsibilities for ensuring a safe working environment. 

All district administrative and supervisory personnel shall ensure that each employee under their direction is properly trained and knowledgeable about their duties, and shall promote strict observance of established procedures and safe work practices. 

All employees, contractors and volunteers are required to: 

  • follow established work procedures, all safety regulations and the directions of their supervisor; 
  • report unsafe conditions or acts; and 
  • perform their duties in a manner which will meet the objective of eliminating workplace accidents. 

This policy will be accessible to all employees at their workplace. It is the responsibility of every employee to co-operate in attaining a safe work environment in order to enjoy a workplace free of bullying, harassment, violence and injury. 

REFERENCES 

  • WorkSafeBC Occupational Health and Safety Policies, Regulations & Guidelines 
  • WorkSafeBC Standards 
  • 4320-10, Bullying and Harassment 
  • 4330-10, Protection of Employees from Violence in the Workplace 
  • 4310-10, Occupational Health and Safety 

4310-10 | Occupational Health and Safety

School District No. 52 is committed to providing a safe and healthy work environment for all employees and to the promotion of safety-conscious attitudes within the District.

Joint Health and Safety Committees will operate at each district site in accordance with WorkSafe BC Regulations.  Training will be offered annually to members of site committees.

All employees will comply with WorkSafe BC Regulations which are relevant to their responsibilities.  Some regulations apply to all employees, for example:

  • New or Young Workers (Regulations 3.22 to 3.25)
  • Employee Conduct (Regulations 4.24 to 4.26)
  • Violence in the Workplace (Regulations 4.27 to 4.31)
  • Bullying and Harassment (Policies D3-115-2; D3-116-1; D3-117-2)

Other regulations are relevant to employees in specific jobs, for example regulations with respect to Chemical Agents or Fall Protection.

School District buildings, grounds and equipment will be maintained to ensure that physical and health hazards are guarded against or eliminated.

Work procedures will be conducive to industrial accident prevention and to provide a work environment free from industrial disease.

Principals, Managers and Directors are responsible to ensure that their employees are trained in, and comply with, proper work procedures to complete their work efficiently without accident or industrial disease.

Employees are responsible to follow proper work procedures and observe all pertinent safety regulations. Employees will promptly communicate any Occupational Health and Safety concerns to their Principal, Manager, or Director.

 

References:
4310              Occupational Health and Safety Policy
4310-40         Incident Reporting and Investigation Decision Tree
4310-44         Near Misses Regulation
4320-10         Bullying and Harassment Regulation
4330-10         Protection of Employees from Violence in the Workplace Regulation


4310-40 | Incident Reporting and Investigation Decision Tree

Was an employee injured as a result of this incident?   Yes   Regulation 4310-31  WorkSafe BC Reporting and Investigation
         
Did the incident involve threat or violence toward an employee?   Yes   Regulation 4310-30  Protection of Employees from Violence in the Workplace.
         
Was a student or member of the public injured as a result of this incident?   Yes   Regulation 4310-42  Injuries to Students and Member of the Public.
         
Was there damage to property (buildings, vehicles, equipment)?   Yes   Regulation 4310-43  Property and Vehicle Damage
         
Was ther a near miss for injury or property damage?   Yes   Regulation 4310-44  Near Misses

 

Note:  An incident may result in a "Yes" answer to more than one question, resulting in more than one investigation form being completed.


4310-40A | Incident Report and Investigation Form

Reference Title View

Incident Report and Investigation Form

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4310-41 | Worksafe BC Injury Reporting and Investigation

Accident or Incident Reporting—All Employees

  1. As soon as possible after the event, report verbally to the appropriate supervisor any work-related injury they have experienced or witnessed.
  2. Follow up with the completion of a copy of WorkSafe BC Form 6A (Worker’s Report of Injury or Occupational Disease to Employer.  Submit this form to the appropriate supervisor within 24 hours of the event.
  3. If the First Aid attendant provides assistance, they will fill out the WorkSafe BC Form 7A (First Aid Report).  This form is filed by the school secretary.
  4. The site supervisor will complete sections 1 through 26 of WorkSafeBC Form 7 (Employer’s Report of Injury or Occupational Disease) and submit Form 6A and Form 7 to the School Board Office within 24 hours of the event.
  5. The School Board Office will complete the remainder of Form 7, have it signed by the Director, Human Resources or the Secretary-Treasurer, and submit it to WorkSafe BC.

Accident or Incident Investigation

  1. After receiving notification of any accident or incident involving an employee, an investigative team comprised of the site supervisor, the employee and a worker representative should, within 24 hours of the notification, conduct an investigation of the incident using WorkSafe BC Form52E40 (Incident Investigation Report).  
  2. The incident will be reviewed collectively, in a constructive way, recommending corrective actions and/or procedures to help prevent the recurrence of similar incidents.
  3. The incident investigation report will identify:
  • the place, date, and time of the incident;
  • the names and job titles of persons injured;
  • the names and job titles of any witnesses;
  • a statement of the sequence of events which preceded the incident;
  • a brief description of the incident;
  • identification of any unsafe conditions, acts or procedures which contributed in any manner to the incident;
  • a determination of the cause or causes of the incident;
  • recommended corrective actions to prevent the recurrence of similar incidents, and
  • the name(s) of the person(s) who investigated the incident.

     4.  Any supervisor who requires assistance or advice in conducting an accident/incident investigation should contact the Director, Human Resources.

Debriefing of Incident

  1. The site based Occupational Health & Safety Committee will review Form 7 reports and Form 52E40 reports at their monthly meetings.
  2. The supervisor will submit the Form52E40 to the school board office. These forms will be kept on file at the school board office.
  3. The District Occupational Health & Safety Committee will review all Form 7 reports and Form 52E40 reports.  Any matters of general application will be reported in the district committee minutes so that other sites are informed.
  4. The supervisor and worker representative who undertook the incident investigation will follow up with the injured individual, witnesses and the first aid representative to ensure their well- being.

Serious Incidents

  1. The supervisor must report to the Superintendent of Schools or Secretary-Treasurer, and the Director, Human Resources, as soon as possible when the incident causes any serious injury (i.e. resulting in hospitalization).

4310-42 | Injuries to Students and Members of the Public

Accident or Incident Reporting—All Employees

  1. As soon as possible after the event, report verbally to the appropriate supervisor any student or public injury they have witnessed or become aware of.
  2. Follow up within 24 hours with the completion of the Report Section of Form 4310-40A Incident Report and Investigation.
  3. Should there be a requirement for first aid, call 911.  The First Aid Attendant is in place to treat injuries to employees, not injuries to students, volunteers and the public; but they may be called for a life-threatening emergency.
  4. If the First Aid attendant provides assistance, they will fill out the WorkSafe BC Form 7A (First Aid Report).  This form is filed by the school secretary.
  5. The Principal will ensure that parents or guardians are informed of a student injury as quickly as possible.
  6. All accidents or incidents involving any person who is not an employee (including students, volunteers and the public) will require the online Incident Report form from the Schools Protection Plan Risk Management Program to be filled out and submitted by the site supervisor and/or their secretary.

 

Accident or Incident Investigation

  1. After receiving notification of an injury to a student, volunteer or member of the public, an investigative team comprised of the site supervisor, the teacher and, if needed, another representative should, within 24 hours of the notification, conduct an investigation of the incident using the Investigation Section of Form 4310-40A Incident Report and Investigation.
  2. The incident will be reviewed collectively, in a constructive way, recommending corrective actions and/or procedures to help prevent the recurrence of similar incidents.
  3. The incident investigation report shall determine:
  • the place, date, and time of the incident;
  • the names and job titles of persons injured;
  • the names of any witnesses;
  • a brief description of the incident;
  • a statement of the sequence of events which preceded the incident;
  • identification of any unsafe conditions, acts or procedures which contributed in any manner to the incident;
  • a determination of the cause or causes of the incident;
  • recommended corrective actions to prevent the recurrence of similar incidents, and
  • the name(s) of the person(s) who investigated the incident.

      4.  Any supervisor who requires assistance or advice in conducting an accident/incident investigation should contact the Director, Human Resources.

Debriefing of Incident

  1. The supervisor will review Form 4310-40A Incident Report and Investigation at a staff meeting.
  2. For serious incidents that could have general application to other schools, the supervisor will submit the Form 4310-XX – Incident Report and Investigation to the Superintendent.
  3. The Superintendent will review the Form 4310-40A Incident Report and Investigation and share the findings at the monthly Administration meeting.
  4. The supervisor will follow up with the injured individual, witnesses and the first aid representative to ensure their well- being.

 

Serious Incidents

  1. The supervisor must report to the Superintendent of Schools or Secretary-Treasurer as soon as possible when the incident causes any serious injury (i.e. resulting in hospitalization).

4310-43 | Property and Vehicle Damage

Accident or Incident Reporting—All Employees

  1. As soon as possible after the event, report verbally to the appropriate supervisor any accident or incident that involves theft, property damage, vehicle damage, a chemical spill, or a release of a hazardous substance.  Vehicle damage includes district-owned or leased vehicles or personal vehicles used on approved district business.
  2. If it is an incident involving a chemical spill or a release of a hazardous substance, the site supervisor will implement Regulation 4110-15 Emergency Preparedness – Hazardous Material Spill.
  3. Follow up within 24 hours with the completion of the Report Section of Form 4310-40 – Incident Report and Investigation.
  4. All accidents or incidents involving theft, property damage, a chemical spill, or a release of a hazardous substance with a value greater than $10,000 will require the online Incident Report form from the Schools Protection Plan Risk Management Program to be filled out and submitted by the site supervisor and/or their secretary.
  5. All accidents or incidents involving vehicle damage greater than $1,000 will require reporting to the RCMP.
  6. The site supervisor will ensure that the Director of Operations is informed as quickly as possible.  The Director of Operations will determine if a claim for repair costs through ICBC or the School Protection Program is appropriate.
  7. The site supervisor, in consultation with the Superintendent or the Secretary-Treasurer, will report the incident to the RCMP if it is deemed appropriate in the circumstances.

 

Accident or Incident Investigation

  1. After receiving notification of any accident or incident that involves theft, property damage, vehicle damage, a chemical spill, or a release of a hazardous substance, an investigative team comprised of the site supervisor, the employee and a worker representative should, with 24 hours of the notification, conduct an investigation of the incident using Investigation Section of Form 4310-40 – Incident Report and Investigation.
  2. The incident will be reviewed collectively, in a constructive way, recommending corrective actions and/or procedures to help prevent the recurrence of similar incidents.
  3. The incident investigation report shall determine:
  • the place, date, and time of the incident;
  • the names and job titles of persons injured (see also Regulation 4310-41 Worksafe BC Injury Reporting and Investigation and Regulation 4340-42 Student and Public Injury Reporting and Investigation);
  • the names of any witnesses;
  • a brief description of the incident;
  • a statement of the sequence of events which preceded the incident;
  • identification of any unsafe conditions, acts or procedures which contributed in any manner to the incident;
  • recommended corrective actions to prevent the recurrence of similar incidents, and
  • the name(s) of the person(s) who investigated the incident.

      4.  Any supervisor who requires assistance or advice in conducting an accident/incident investigation should contact the Director of Human Resources.

 

Debriefing of Incident

  1. The supervisor will review Form 4310-40 – Incident Report and Investigation at a staff meeting or with the site based health and safety committee, as appropriate.
  1. For serious incidents that could have general application to other schools, the supervisor will submit the Form 4310-40 – Incident Report and Investigation to the Superintendent.
  1. The Superintendent will review the Form 4310-40 – Incident Report and Investigation and share the findings at the monthly Administration meeting, or ask the Secretary-Treasurer to share the report with the District Occupational Health & Safety Committee.
  1. The supervisor will follow up with the injured individual, witnesses and the first aid representative to ensure their well- being.

 

Serious Incidents

  1. The supervisor must report to the Superintendent of Schools or Secretary-Treasurer as soon as possible when the incident:
  2. causes property damage of $10,000 or more or vehicle damage of $1,000 or more;
  3. is a vehicle accident involving students; or
  4. involves a chemical spill or a release of a hazardous material (see Regulation 4110-15 Emergency Preparedness – Hazardous Material Spill).

4310-44 | Near Misses

Near Miss Reporting—All Employees

  1. As soon as possible after the event, report verbally to the appropriate supervisor any accident or incident they have witnessed or become aware of which had the potential to cause an injury or property damage.
  2. Follow up within 24 hours with the completion of the Report Section of Form 4310-YY - Near Miss Report.
  3. The site supervisor will, where applicable, ensure that the Director of Operations is informed as quickly as possible.

Accident or Incident Investigation

  1. After receiving notification of a near miss, the site supervisor should , within 24 hours of the notification, conduct an investigation of the incident using the Form 4310-YY - Near Miss Report.
  2. The near miss will be reviewed collectively, in a constructive way, recommending corrective actions and/or procedures to help prevent the recurrence of similar incidents.
  3. The near miss investigation shall determine:
  • the place, date, and time of the incident;
  • the names and job titles of persons involved;
  • the names of any witnesses;
  • a brief description of the incident;
  • a statement of the sequence of events which preceded the incident;
  • identification of any unsafe conditions, acts or procedures which contributed in any manner to the incident;
  • recommended corrective actions to prevent the recurrence of similar incidents, and
  • the name(s) of the person(s) who investigated the incident.

     4.  Any supervisor who requires assistance or advice in conducting a near miss investigation should contact the Director, Human Resources.

 

Debriefing of Incident

  1. The supervisor will review Form 4310-YY - Near Miss Report at a staff meeting or with the site based health and safety committee, as appropriate.
  2. For near misses that could have general application to other schools, the supervisor will submit the Form 4310-YY - Near Miss Report to the Superintendent.
  3. The Superintendent will review the Form 4310-40 - Incident Report and Investigation and share the findings at the monthly Administration meeting, or ask the Secretary-Treasurer to share the findings with the District Occupational Health & Safety Committee.
  4. The supervisor will follow up with anyone affected by the near miss to ensure their well- being.

 

Serious Incidents

  1. The supervisor must report to the Superintendent of Schools or Secretary-Treasurer as soon as possible any near miss with the potential to cause serious injury or damage.

4310-44A | Near Miss Form

Reference Title View

Near Miss Form

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4320-10 | Bullying and Harassment Regulation

1.    Overview and Definitions

1.1.    The following definitions apply within this regulation:

     1.1.1.    “Bullying” includes:
         1.1.1.1.  the exercise of power or authority in a manner which serves no legitimate school or work purpose and which a person ought reasonably to know is inappropriate; or
         1.1.1.2.  misuses of power or authority including intimidation, threats, coercion and blackmail.

1.1.2.    “Personal Harassment” includes:
         1.1.2.1.    any improper behaviour that is directed at or offensive to another person, is unwelcome, and which the person knows or ought reasonably to know would be unwelcome; or
         1.1.2.2.    objectionable conduct, comment, materials or display that demeans, belittles, intimidates, or humiliates another person.

1.1.3.    “Sexual Harassment” is any unwelcome comment or conduct of a sexual nature that may detrimentally affect the school or work environment or lead to adverse school or job related consequences for the victim of the harassment. Examples of sexual harassment include:
     1.1.3.1.    gender based remarks;
     1.1.3.2.    unwanted physical contact;
     1.1.3.3.    sexual advances;
     1.1.3.4.    requests for sexual favors;
     1.1.3.5.    suggestive or offensive comments;
     1.1.3.6.    gestures emphasizing sexuality, sexual identity or sexual orientation;
     1.1.3.7.    display of materials or graffiti which is sexually explicit or degrading;
     1.1.3.8.    conduct or comment of a sexual nature that has the effect of creating an offensive environment;
     1.1.3.9.    jokes (sexual content or overtones) that cause embarrassment; and
     1.1.3.10.    conditioning grades, promotions, or other school or employment related decisions, on sexual conduct.

1.1.4.    To establish bullying, or personal or sexual harassment, the complainant must show that a reasonable person in the complainant’s position would have perceived the conduct or comments as bullying or harassing.  Furthermore, the complainant must show that a reasonable person in the alleged bully’s or harasser's position would have known — or ought to have known — that the behaviour was unwelcome.

1.1.5.    Bullying and harassment do not include actions occasioned through exercising in good faith the employer’s and employee’s respective rights and responsibilities for legitimate work-related purposes, including supervision.

2.    Guiding Principles

2.1.    District administration will take actions to foster a respectful learning and working environment and implement this policy and regulation in a manner that is consistent with the protections contained in the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, the British Columbia Human Rights Code, the School Act (including the Provincial Standards for Codes of Conduct Order), and other relevant Board policies and standards, when dealing with any matters being addressed through this policy and regulation.

2.2.    School-based administrators and other site supervisors are responsible for using all reasonable efforts to create and maintain a respectful learning and working environment which is free from bullying and harassment.  

2.3.    School-based administrators and other site supervisors shall review this regulation annually with staff at a staff meeting. A policy statement in pamphlet form will be available to employees. Training will be provided to school-based administrators and other site supervisors to assist in the effective implementation of this regulation.

2.4.    School-based administrators and other site supervisors shall, at the beginning of each school year, arrange to provide employees with an awareness program that reviews this policy and regulations and educates employees about bullying, or personal and/or sexual harassment.  

2.5.    Complaints of bullying or harassment will be dealt with as quickly as possible. Where bullying or harassment complaints involve employees, the processes used will conform with any requirements contained within collective agreements or contracts of employment.

2.6.    Individuals who believe they are being subjected to bullying or harassment are encouraged, where appropriate, to bring the matter to the attention of the person responsible for the conduct in question. 

2.7.    Where an individual does not wish to deal directly with the person responsible for the objectionable conduct, they are encouraged to approach their association representatives, supervisor, or another advocate in an attempt to resolve their concerns. 

2.8.    With regard to employees, any process or discipline resulting from a complaint of bullying or harassment will follow procedures outlined in the appropriate collective agreement or contract of employment.  In the case of students, parents or others, relevant Board policies and procedures and District and school codes of conduct will be applicable.  

2.9.    Where there are no procedures for addressing a complaint contained in a collective agreement, employment contract or District policy, complaints of bullying or harassment shall be addressed according to the procedures contained in this regulation.

2.10.    Students who are being harassed (including bullying) should report any incidents to a person of authority at their school or to a parent who may make such a report on the student’s behalf.  Complaints of student harassment and bullying shall be acted on immediately by a school-based or District administrator as is appropriate. 

3.    Individual Responsibilities

3.1.    All members of the school community, including employees, students, contract employees and volunteers shall treat each other with respect, dignity, tolerance and consideration.

3.2.    Members of the school community shall ensure that their verbal, written and electronic communications with each other is respectful and supportive of a productive and safe working and learning environment.

3.3.    Employees shall assist and cooperate with each other, including their immediate supervisor, in ensuring that their work is performed in a productive, efficient and respectful fashion consistent with the principles outlined in this policy and regulation.

3.4.    Members of the school community shall respect the right of all members to work in an environment free from bullying, harassment and discrimination.

3.5.    Members of the school community shall adhere to the Board policies and regulations, and any applicable collective agreement or employment contract provisions.

3.6.    All persons involved in a complaint under these procedures shall treat information as confidential.  Allegations of bullying, or personal or sexual harassment, often involve sensitive disclosures.  Confidentiality is important so that those who may have been bullied, or personally or sexually harassed, are encouraged to come forward and are reassured that their confidentiality is protected.  Similarly, those who are the subject of bullying or harassment complaints will be subject to the same confidentiality protections.

3.7.    Individuals are encouraged to report all incidents of bullying, or personal or sexual harassment, without fear of reprisal.  Retaliation against any individual for reporting bullying or harassment will not be tolerated.

Procedures for Employees When There is No Collective Agreement or Other Relevant Procedures Available to Address Bullying or Harassment Complaints

4.    Step 1 – Informal Procedure

4.1.    An employee/complainant who believes he or she has been subjected to bullying or harassment is encouraged to bring the matter to the attention of the person/respondent believed to be responsible for the conduct. 

4.2.    Where the complainant does not wish to deal directly with the respondent, the complainant may approach his/her association representative, supervisor or another advocate to request assistance in resolving the matter and to discuss potential means of resolving the complaint.

4.3.    The respondent shall be advised of the complaint in a timely manner by the complainant or by the association representative, supervisor or other advocate asked to assist in resolving the matter.

4.4.    If the matter is resolved to the complainant's satisfaction, the matter is deemed to be resolved.

5.    Step 2 – Formal Process

5.1.    If a complainant chooses not to meet with the respondent, or if the matter is not resolved through the informal process outlined in Section 4, a complaint may be filed in writing with the Director, Human Resources no later than thirty (30) days after the last incident of alleged bullying or harassment or twelve (12) months after the first incident.  The specifics of the complaint shall include, but not be limited to, the following:
        5.1.1.    The person or persons who are the subject of the complaint.
        5.1.2.    The specific conduct, behaviour and/or comments which are alleged to be bullying or harassment.
        5.1.3.    The specific or general date(s) on which the above occurred.
        5.1.4.    Which clause in Section 1 has allegedly been breached.

In the event that complaint is against the Director, Human Resources, the complaint may be filed with the Secretary-Treasurer.

The Director, Human Resources (or the Secretary-Treasurer where applicable) may, in his/her discretion, allow a complaint to be filed outside the time period noted in this section.

5.2.    On receipt of a bullying or harassment complaint, the Director, Human Resources shall first determine whether the complaint meets the definition of bullying or harassment contained in this policy.  In the event that the Director, Human Resources determines that the complaint does not meet the definition of bullying or harassment, the complainant will be so notified in writing.  The person against whom the complaint of bullying or harassment has been made will also receive written notification of that determination.  

5.3.    If the Director, Human Resources determines a complaint of bullying or harassment falls within the scope of the harassment policy, the Director, Human Resources (or the Secretary-Treasurer where applicable) shall notify the respondent of the complaint and provide notice of an investigation.  The notification shall be in writing and shall include but not be limited to the following:
    5.3.1.    A reference to this regulation.
    5.3.2.    A copy of the complaint provided under sections 5.1 above.
    5.3.3.    A request for a written response to the specific allegations cited in the complaint and a ten (10) calendar day time limit for such response to be received.

5.4.    At the outset of an investigation the complainant is required to make it known to the Director, Human Resources if there is an action being taken through another agency regarding a matter related to the bullying or harassment complaint.  The district may determine it is not appropriate to investigate a complaint under the harassment policy where another process is being undertaken (e.g., WCB Regulations, Human Rights Code, Employment Standards Act, etc.).

5.5.    The Director, Human Resources may conduct the investigation him/herself or, if appropriate, may appoint a trained investigator to conduct the investigation.

5.6.    The investigator will conduct interviews with relevant parties to obtain information and clarify details of the complaint.  Both parties will have an opportunity to identify witnesses or others to be interviewed.  All interviews will be conducted in a confidential manner.

5.7.    In conducting the investigation, the investigator may request the assistance of other Board staff, or outside legal or expert professionals, as is considered necessary.

5.8.    At any time during the course of the investigation, the parties may reach resolution or settlement of the matter, in which case the investigator may propose that the investigation be discontinued.  This may involve the use of mediation with the agreement of both parties.  This agreement, if reached, shall be in writing and be signed by both parties.

5.9.    In the event there is no agreement reached, the investigator shall normally complete a written report within thirty (30) working days of the receipt of the complaint, and attempt to finally resolve the matter within a further ten (10) working days.

5.10.    The Director, Human Resources may, where appropriate, refer the report to legal advisors, members of the executive team or others, to assist in a determination of appropriate action to be taken with respect to the complaint.  Where the Director, Human Resources determines that the matter should be referred to the Board for consideration and resolution, the Director, Human Resources will refer the matter to an in-camera meeting of the Board.

5.11.    The following may be forms of action:
       5.11.1.    education and training of an employee or group of employees.
       5.11.2.    review and modification of related policies, procedures and/or practices in the workplace.
       5.11.3.    monitoring of the behaviour of an employee or group of employees.
       5.11.4.    transfers, reassignments, changes in shifts or other changes in the workplace.
       5.11.5.    disciplinary action up to and including dismissal.
       5.11.6.    where necessary, banning non-employees from the premises.
       5.11.7.    other strategies appropriate to the particular circumstances designed to eliminate and/or prevent bullying and harassment.

Where changes in the workplace are made necessary by demonstrated bullying, or personal or sexual harassment, the burden of those changes shall be borne by the person who has engaged in the bullying or harassing conduct.

5.12.    Where the Director, Human Resources determines that bullying or harassment has taken place, the complainant may, when appropriate, be entitled to a remedy.

5.13.    It is recognized that vexatious or malicious complaints may damage the reputation of, or be unjust to, other persons. Any person found to have made vexatious or malicious allegations may be subject to appropriate disciplinary or other action.

Statutory and Contractual References: 
BC School Act, Regulations and Ministerial Orders
Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms
B.C. Human Rights Code
Article E.2, Teachers' Collective Agreement
Article 10.10, IUOE Local 882-BCollective Agreement


4330-10 | Protection of Employees from Violence in the Workplace

Guideline:

Any act or threat of violence directed towards an employee by another employee or a non-employee, including students, shall not be tolerated and will be dealt with accordingly.

Administrative Regulations:

1.         The definition of violence is:

The attempted or actual exercise of physical force so as to cause injury to an employee and includes any threatening statement or behaviour which gives an employee reasonable cause to believe that the employee is at risk of injury.  (Reference WorkSafe, Regulation 4.27)

2.         All employees shall be informed of identified risks of violence related to their job responsibilities that they may encounter during their work day.

3.         Training may be provided to enable employees to recognize potential risks of violence in order that they may take appropriate preventive measures.

4.         All incidents of violence shall be responded to, with appropriate measures taken in accordance with the School Act and District Policies and Regulations, in order to minimize or prevent a recurrence.  Post incident trauma counselling will be available for employee(s) affected by the incident.

 

Administrative Reporting Procedures:

1.         When an employee believes they are at risk due to an act or threat of violence, the employee shall:

     a)    Secrure the safety of the children (if present) and remove themselves from the situation.

     b)    Report the circumstances of the incident to their Administrative Officer/Supervisor, as soon as possible.

2.        When a report of such an incident is received by an Administrative Officer/Supervisor, they shall:

     a)     ensure the employee(s) is no longer at risk.

     b)     if deemed necessary, report the incident to the local law enforcement authority, seeking appropriate assistance to eliminate the immediate risk.

     c)     complete an investigation into the incident (see Incident Risk Assessment below).

     d)     if it has been determined that a critical incident of violence towards an employee has occurred, immediately report the full circumstances of the incident to the Superintendent or designate.

     e)     if the investigation confirms a violent incident, file a written report on the appropriate form (Form 4330-20) with the Secretary-Treasurer.
 

3.         It is the responsibility of each worksite supervisor (for schools, the Administrative Officer) to ensure all employees are aware of the Threat and Violence Report (Form 4330-20).  New employees shall be advised within thirty (30) days of the start of their employment with respect to these reporting procedures.  Supervisors, on a yearly basis, are to review these reporting procedures with their staff.

 

4.         The contents of a Threat and Violence Report will be shared with the staff in the workplace, if deemed appropriate by the Superintendent or the Administrative Officer/Supervisor.  If a safety plan to address the risk of violence is developed and implemented, all staff in the workplace will be informed of the existence of the safety plan, as required by WorkSafe BC.  A copy of the plan will be available for review by staff.

 

5.         The School District Occupational Health & Safety Committee shall review all Threat and Violence Reports and shall make recommendations to the Board, as necessary, to reduce future risk.

Incident Risk Assessment

An investigation and risk assessment shall be performed if an incident of violence or threatening behaviour occurs in the workplace (WorkSafe Regulation 4.30(3)(d)).  The Administrative Officer/Supervisor will:

  1. Investigate the incident, asking employees who were involved in the incident or witnessed the incident to provide a statement of their observations.
  2. If the incident involves a student, consider whether the student in question has a documented special need and how that may have contributed to the incident.
  3. Call the “in-school” Violence, Threat, Risk Assessment (VTRA) team together to investigate the level of risk to students and staff. 
  4. Consider asking a member of the the District VTRA team to join the “in-school” VTRA team during the investigation.
  5. Make recommendations to the Superintendent and the District Safe School Coordinator.

The written Threat and Violence Reports (Form 4330-20) are an important resource for follow-up assessments.

 

Work Site Risk Assessment

A risk assessment shall be performed at all work sites (as per WorkSafe Regulation 4.28) to ascertain the risk of injury to workers from violence arising out of their employment. A work site risk assessment should take place when a new school is opened and whenever there is a significant change in the configuration of a school or other workplace.

A risk assessment must include consideration of:

  1. Previous experience in that workplace;
  2. Occupational experience in similar workplaces; and
  3. The location and circumstances in which work will take place.

In the school setting, risk assessment should consider:

  • Relevant history of violence. Records and employees can provide the information on the type, severity, frequency and the nature of past violent incidents.
  • Experiences and responses at other schools in the district.
  • The nature of the work environment. Work location, number of staff at a work site, workplace layout, lighting, and security provisions should be considered.
  • The attributes of workers. Considerations include the level of skill and training employees possess in dealing with confrontational incidents and recognition that women and persons with disabilities are most at risk to violence.

 

Responsibilities:

Employees will:

  • Provide input into risk assessments;
  • Follow procedures for prevention of violence;
  • Report incidents of violence;
  • Provide input into incident investigations; and
  • Consider accessing counselling services when offered by the employer.

District Staff, Administrative Officers and Supervisors will:

Risk Assessment:

  • Evaluate work-site lay-out, and conduct and document work site risk assessments.
  • Conduct and document incident risk assessments.

  Inform Staff:

  • Inform staff of the nature and extent of the risk of violence as identified in the Work Site Risk Assessment (WorkSafe Regulation 4.30(1)).
  • Facilitate on-going discussions on violence issues with staff;
  • Provide staff with information related to the risk of violence from persons who have a relevant history of violent behaviour and whom staff are likely to encounter in their work (WorkSafe Regulation 4.30(2)) – specifically this will apply where a safety plan is put in place for a student.

  Train Staff:

  • Instruct staff on procedures for recognizing, preventing or minimizing, responding to and reporting incidents of violence (WorkSafe Regulation 4.30(3)).
  • Determine training requirements, in consultation with staff;

  Investigate:

  • Comply with procedures for reporting, investigating and documenting incidents of violence in accordance with WCB regulations and reporting procedures with a copy forwarded to the Secretary-Treasurer.

  Report Incidents:

  • Promote and encourage reporting of violent incidents.

  Take Action:

  • Establish procedures and work arrangements to eliminate or minimize the risk to workers from violence (WorkSafe Regulation 4.29); this will include:
  • Identifying what action(s) were taken to eliminate or minimize the risks to the employee(s); and
  • Taking corrective action and monitoring its effectiveness.
  • If required, ensure staff receive medical attention.
  • Advise impacted staff of counselling services available through the Employee & Family Assistance Program (WorkSafe Regulation 4.30(3)(c)).

The Work Site Occupational Health and Safety Committee will:

  • Provide input into work site risk assessments;
  • Review "Threat and Violence Reports" for health and safety implications; and
  • After consultation with the VTRA team, make recommendations to the Administrator.

The Violence, Threat, Risk Assessment (VTRA) team will:

  • Participate in the investigation of an incident of violence or threatening behaviour; and
  • Make recommendations to the Superintendent and the District Safe School Coordinator.

The joint district Occupational Health & Safety Committee will:

  • Review all Form 4330-20 reports; if necessary:
  • The form will be returned to the site supervisor if further action is warranted; and/or
  • The results of the investigation will be reported in the district minutes so that other sites are made aware of findings that may be relevant to their site.

 

Other References:

Basic Threat and Risk Assessment Training Guide, 5th Edition, Level 2: Safer Schools Together WorkSafe BC  Regulations 4.27 to 4.30


4330-20A | Threat/ Violence Report - Form

Reference Title View

4330-20A

Threat/ Violence Report - Form

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5 | Indemnification of Trustees, Officers and Employees

A.  GENERAL

1.         The Board of Trustees will indemnify an officer or an employee of the Board or a trustee against a claim for damages arising out of the performance of his or her duties or where an inquiry under Part 2 of the Inquiry Act or other proceeding involves the administration and conduct of the business of the school district and may, by an affirmative vote of a majority of its members, pay legal costs incurred in proceedings out of the claim or inquiry or other proceedings, in accordance with the regulations.

2.         The Board of Trustees shall not seek indemnity against an officer or an employee of the Board in respect of any action by the officer or employee that results in a claim for damages against the Board except where the claim for damages arises out of the gross negligence of the officer or employee or where the officer or employee acted wilfully contrary to the terms of his or her employment or an order of a superior, in accordance with the regulations.

 

B.  REGULATIONS

1.         This Bylaw shall apply:

    (a)        to individuals who are currently officers, employees or trustees of the School District; and

    (b)       to individuals who were formerly officers, employees or trustees of the School District provided that the occurrence which gives rise to the claim for indemnification occurred while they were an officer or employee or trustee.

 

2.         The Board shall indemnify an officer, employee or trustee against a claim for damages against the officer, employee or trustee arising out of the performance of his or her duties and where an inquiry under Part 2 of the Inquiry Act or other proceedings involves the administration and conduct of the business of the School District except as provided for in this Policy.

 

3.         The Board shall not indemnify an officer, employee or trustee for any matters for which insurance coverage is available to cover the liability of the officer, employee or trustee or against:

     (a)     liability and legal fees incurred as a result of an action or other proceeding taken by the Board against the officer, employee or trustee or as a result of an action or proceeding taken by the officer, employee or trustee against the Board;

     (b)     liability to pay a fine, penalty or order imposed as a result of the conviction for an offence;

     (c)      legal fees incurred as a result of a prosecution where the officer, employee or trustee is convicted of an offence or obtains a conditional or absolute discharge;

     (d)     liability and legal fees incurred as a result of proceedings under the Teaching Profession Act unless the Board, by an affirmative vote of a majority of its members, so agrees;

     (e)     legal fees incurred in an appeal of any conviction, sentence, judgement or order unless the Board, by an affirmative vote of a majority of its members, so agrees;

     (f)     liability and legal fees incurred by an officer, employee or trustee where the Court determines that the officer, employee or trustee knowingly contravened Section 78 of the School Act;

    (g)     liability and legal fees incurred by an officer, employee or trustee where the Court determines that the officer, employee or trustee knowingly permitted or authorized an expenditure not authorized by an enactment;

    (h)     liability incurred by an officer, employee or trustee as a result of an restitution ordered pursuant to Section 83(1)(b) of the School Act;

    (i)      those matters for which the Board may seek indemnity from an employee or trustee pursuant to its authority under Section 113(3) of the School Act.

 

4.       For those matters covered by section 2 and not excluded by section 3, an officer, employee or trustee may:

     (a)        retain such legal counsel as the Board may appoint and such legal counsel shall be paid for and directed by the Board; or

     (b)       retain such legal counsel as the officer, employee or trustee may choose, in which case the Board shall:

          (i)         have the right to direct the defence and to settle or compromise the claim or action; and

          (ii)        determine whether or not the officer, employee or trustee will be reimbursed by the Board for legal fees or any portion of the legal fees that have been paid by the officer, employee or trustee prior to the approval of the Board.

 

5.         If the Board determines to reimburse the officer, employee or trustee, the Board shall:

           (i)         have the right to approve in advance any agreement for legal fees and disbursements;

           (ii)        have the right to pay all or part of the legal fees and disbursements and to set a maximum for legal fees and disbursements; and

           (iii)       have the right to tax the account of the legal counsel and the officer, employee or trustee shall agree to include such a term in the agreement with his/her counsel.

 

6.         Any amount that may be payable by the Board shall be reduced by any court costs awarded to the officer, employee or trustee.

 

7.         The Board shall give consideration to advancing legal costs to the officer, employee or trustee prior to the final resolution of a claim or action in order to prevent undue hardship.  When the Board advances such costs to a officer, employee or trustee, the officer, employee or trustee shall provide a written authorization for the Board to deduct an amount equivalent to the costs advanced from future funds payable to the officer, employee or trustee by the Board.  The authorization shall only be used by the Board if it is determined at a later date that the officer, employee or trustee is not entitled to be indemnified under the terms of this Policy.

 

Related Legislation:

School Act, Section 113


5110 | Corporate Sponsorship and Access to Students Policy

RATIONALE/PURPOSE

Positive relationships between the school district and the business/corporate sector can contribute to the quality of education for students. However, the Board has an obligation to protect the welfare of students and the integrity of the learning environment. The Board therefore expects that school district/corporate relationships, including sponsorships and donations, will be conducted in an ethical manner.

Corporate sponsorships and donations arise from informal or formal relationships where goods, services or funds are provided in exchange for returns such as gaining positive recognition or meeting a corporation’s goal related to community involvement.

 

POLICY
The Board encourages positive relationships and partnerships between the school district and the business/corporate sector that benefit students and enhance the educational experience of the school community. Corporate sponsorships and donations are provided to the school district to enhance but not replace funding from the provincial government.

The Board supports corporate sponsorships and donations which treat the welfare of students as a paramount concern and which:

  1. enhance the delivery of quality, relevant and culturally responsive curricular and co-curricular programs for students;
  2. create additional opportunities for students;
  3. benefit the schools and the school district;
  4. are respectful of community standards;
  5. are respectful of the educational setting;
  6. are consistent with school district policies and procedures.

The Board will recognize the contributions of corporate sponsors through an appropriate expression of appreciation and by providing a charitable receipt for income tax purposes.  At least three times per year the Board will receive a report of contributions received with a value of $10,000 or more. 

Any pending agreements involving business partnerships, sponsorship identification, commercial relationships, or corporate sponsorship shall be approved by the Superintendent, who has the right to withhold approval or refer the agreement to the Board for approval.  Agreements in excess of $75,000 require the approval of the Board.

 

Related Policies and Regulations:

5110-10     General Access to Students Regulation 
5110-20     Name Lists Regulation
5110-30     Advertising Materials in Schools Regulation
5110-40     Commercial Photographers in Schools (Class and Individual Photographs)
5210          Naming Policy
5210-10     School Participation in Community and Other Campaigns

 


5110-10 | General Access to Students

Access to students will only occur in accordance with this Regulation.  Access is defined as the opportunity to expose students to:

  • the general public through the media (examples: print, radio, television or the internet);
  • advertising;
  • the soliciting for sales;
  • the administering of interviews or questionnaires;
  • speakers;
  • materials advocating points of view; or,
  • participation in community campaigns.

 

Access to students by the media, outside agencies and individuals, including advertising by businesses, will be approved on the basis of perceived educational benefit weighed against the extent to which any contact may constitute an undue influence.

When interviewing, photographing or video-taping a student with special needs, the student shall not be identified as one that receives special education services without prior, written parent/guardian permission.

1.  Media Exposure:  Parent/guardian approval to photograph, interview or video-tape children is provided through school registration forms.  The parent/guardian can rescind this approval at any time by written request.  In the event that the media exposure is anticipated to circulate beyond the local community, approval by the Superintendent of Schools is required.

2.  Advertising in Schools:   All businesses wishing to post or circulate advertising material in or through schools shall first have the material approved by the Superintendent of Schools.  Once reviewed, and approval is given in principle by the Superintendent of Schools, the final decision rests with the school Principal. 

3.  Commercial Access:  Participation in commercially sponsored programs shall be approved by the Superintendent of Schools.  The criteria to be applied will include: 

  • educational value of program; 
  • consistency of activity with school’s program; 
  • degree of advertising or identification with sponsoring entity; 
  • degree of involvement between students and sponsoring entity (i.e., do students have to sign-up or otherwise gather at the place of business?).

4.  Other Categories of Access:  The administration of questionnaires and surveys or student involvement in research projects requires prior authorization by the Board of School Trustees.  For interviews or canvassing to occur, Board approval is also required.

      From time to time non-teaching personnel may be invited to speak to a school or to groups within the school.  Principals must be informed of proposed speaking engagements and have the right to approve or disapprove of speakers.

      Caution must be exercised with speakers who have affiliations with religious or political organizations.  No person shall be allowed to speak with students on topics which actively promote a particular religious or political philosophy unless alternative viewpoints are presented in an organized and coordinated manner.

      Other individuals may, from time to time, request permission to speak to students.  In these cases, they must have permission from the Superintendent of Schools before the Principal will entertain the request.  The final decision then rests with the Principal.


5110-20 | Name Lists

Except by written permission of the Superintendent of Schools, the following activity is forbidden:

The supplying of lists of the names or addresses of employees, students or parents to any outside individual, company or organization except when required because of legislation or with the person's permission.


5110-30 | Advertising Materials in Schools

Many businesses occasionally produce materials of considerable value for school use, the production of which is designed to create general goodwill for the producer rather than to encourage directly the sale of a specific product or service.  The Board has a responsibility to prevent the schools from being used as the means of distributing advertising materials.

Such advertising materials may be accepted for use in the schools, if the following conditions are met:

  1. The materials are judged by the Superintendent of Schools to have sufficient educational or other value to justify their being used in schools; and
  2. The conditions of their use within the schools are determined by the Superintendent of Schools and are not imposed by any outside organization.

Samples of materials of this kind approved for acceptance in the schools shall be kept for inspection by the Board as desired.

Any issue which goes beyond this Regulation will be governed by the Regulation entitled:  "General Access to Students".


5120 | Naming Policy

RATIONALE
From time to time the Board will need to name a new school or will consider renaming an existing school.  The Board may consider naming part of a school building or property in memory of a person. This policy outlines criteria the Board will consider in the process of naming all or part of a building or property.

 

POLICY
The following criteria will be considered by the Board in making the naming decision:

  1. Input will be received through reasonable consultation with members of the school community, including student and parent representatives, staff members of the school, and members of the local community.
  2. A school, or part of a school, will not normally be named for a living person.
  3. Existing schools will not normally be renamed.
  4. The name of a school will normally be based on the geographic or community context of the school.
  5. A school, or part of a school (e.g., library, gymnasium, field, theatre), may be named in memory of a person in recognition of distinguished service to that school, or if the Board recognizes a compelling, historically significant reason to do so. If a name is being considered, consultation with members of that person's family, if possible, should be undertaken.

 

 

Related Policies and Regulations:
Province of British Columbia Naming Privileges Policy


5210-10 | School Participation in Community and Other Campaigns

The Board believes that the use of students to raise money for outside agencies should be kept to a minimum and that each campaign should be given careful consideration with respect to educational value and time commitment.

The Board does not condone canvassing of teachers or students in the schools by any organization except as approved by regulation.

The following organizations are approved for student participation:

  1. Poppy sales for Remembrance Day.
  2. U.N.I.C.E.F.
  3. Salvation Army Food Hamper.
  4. Heart and Stroke Foundation for B.C. and the Yukon (Jump Rope for Heart)
  5. Canadian Cancer Society.

Other campaigns require the approval of the Board prior to school and or student participation.

School participation in community and other campaigns must adhere to the following regulations:

  1. Fundraising should not involve instructional time.
  2. Fundraising shall be voluntary on behalf of the students and staff.
  3. There shall be no competition for funds raised by students and/or schools, nor shall incentives be provided to students for raising funds.
  4. Participation in any fundraising, as described in these regulations, shall be at the discretion of the Administrative Officer and the parent/guardian of the students involved.
  5. With the exception of U.N.I.C.E.F., there shall be no door-to-door canvassing.  Fundraising for outside agencies in malls or shopping centres is not permitted.
  6. Administrative Officers must ensure that it is the parents that determine if their child shall participate in a canvas.
     

PROHIBITED ACTIVITIES - COMPETITIONS

Except by express permission of the Superintendent the following activity is forbidden:

Promotion through the schools of commercial competitions of any sort suggested by outside organizations whether the competitions involve work to be   completed during school hours or at other times.  Competitions that are not commercial in nature should be approved by the School's Administrative Officer.


5220 | Use of Schools, Grounds and Equipment Policy

POLICY

The Board supports the use of schools, grounds, and equipment for organized student and teacher activities, at the discretion of the school principal.

The Board also supports the use of schools by licensed child care providers, as part of British Columbia's Early Years Strategy, an eight-year commitment to support early childhood development and help families with licensed child care.

Therefore, in accordance with the School Act, the Board of Education promotes the use of board­ owned property by licensed child care providers between the hours of 7:00 am and 6:00 pm on weekdays, provided the space is not required for K-12 education programs, early learning programs, or extra-curricular activities.

Other personal or group use of schools, grounds, and equipment is subject to the Regulations accompanying this policy.

REFERENCES
School Act, Section 85.1


5220-10 | Use of Schools, Grounds, and Equipment

The use of schools, grounds and equipment for all organized student and teacher activities is at the discretion of the Principal. 

Personal use or group use other than the foregoing will be subject to the terms set forth in this Regulation.

Organizations or individuals requesting the use school facilities, including the City of Prince Rupert, will be referred to the Board Office.  Form 5220-30A Rental Agreement for Use of School Facilities must be completed.

The District will make specified portions of school buildings and grounds available to the Recreation Department, City of Prince Rupert, on request for any legal purpose when such use will not conflict with the school programs or school needs. 

Fees may be assessed by the Recreation Department for the use of school facilities.  When fees are assessed, the Recreation Department and the School District must agree on the portion of those fees which will be remitted to the School District.

Except by Board resolution school facilities shall not be used for the following:

1.         Bingos and public dances, regardless of the proposed distribution of the proceeds.

2.         The earning of profit by an individual or business.

3.         Events requiring a liquor license.

Non-profit organizations providing services to children may apply for a waiver of part or all of the fees associated with a rental by completing Form 5220-30B Fee Waiver or Reduction Application for Facilities Rental.  The decision on a waiver is at the discretion of the Secretary-Treasurer, but will not exceed 50% of the normal rental fee for the facility.

 

REFERENCE:

5220             Use of School, Grounds and Equipment Policy
5220-20        Northwest Community College Use of Schools and Equipment Regulation
5220-30A      Rental Agreement for Use of School Facilities FORM
5220-30B      Fee Waiver or Reduction Application for Facilities Rental FORM


5220-20 | Northwest Community College Use of Schools and Equipment

The use of schools and equipment by the Northwest Community College (NWCC) may be permitted for delivery of a designated credit course or program.  An Addendum to the Master Agreement between NWCC and the School District is required.  The Master Agreement and Addendum will set out the terms, including the responsibilities of NWCC and the district, for that designated credit course or program.

Occasional use of schools or equipment may also be provided in conjunction with a NWCC course, program or event.  Regulation 5220-10 Use of Schools, Grounds and Equipment will be utilized to approve any occasional use.  Principals will ensure that proper care and use is made of school facilities.  Where there is a difference of opinion between the Principal and the College representative, the Principal will refer the matter to the Superintendent of Schools.

 

REFERENCE:

5220               Use of School, Grounds and Equipment Policy

5220-10         Use of Schools, Grounds and Equipment Regulation


5220-30A | Rental Agreement for Use of School Facilities

Reference Title View

Rental Agreement for Use of School Facilities

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5220-30B | Fee Waiver / Reduction Form for Use of School Facilities

Reference Title View

Reduction Form for Use of School Facilities

view »

5230-10 | Billeting in Schools

School District No. 52 is prepared to billet students from schools in other communities. When students are being billeted in schools, the following must be done:

Forms 5220-30A Rental Agreement for Use of School Facilities and 5220-30B Fee Waiver / Reduction Application for Facilities Rental must be completed

Notification to the Fire Department and R.C.M.P. is required to advise them that a group is occupying the school overnight.  The Fire Department would otherwise normally assume that the school is unoccupied at night and would "fight" a fire under that assumption.  If they have been advised that the school is occupied, their tactics will be geared to lifesaving.

Where possible, the school security system should only be shut down for the portion of the building to be used by the students and their supervisors. Unoccupied areas of the school may be vulnerable to intruders. It is important that the Principal is aware of this situation and takes appropriate steps to ensure the security of the building.

No custodians are available in the morning or on weekends. The Principal is responsible  to ensure that necessary arrangements for clean-up and garbage removal are made.

Rental fees for student groups will normally be waived; however if custodians must be called in for opening, closing or clean-up of schools those costs will be charged to the student group.

 

Related

5220   Use of Schools, Grounds and Equipment


5310 | Volunteer Policy

The Board believes that the education of students is a shared responsibility among its employees, parents and members of the community.  The active involvement of parents and the appropriate use of volunteers as helpers have has the potential to provide considerable benefit to our students and increase communications and positive relationships between the schools and the community.  Volunteers also make valued and appreciated contributions to enhancing enhanced student success, the enjoyment of school and enriching an enriched school climate. 

Involvement of volunteers is encouraged in activities for which the volunteer is qualified and which do not interfere with or replace employees performing their regular duties.  Volunteers shall perform tasks only under the supervision and guidance of district employeesstaff. 

The Board encourages expects the use of volunteers in District schools and expects its schools to be safe and secure.  The use of volunteers must be supported by appropriate safeguards with respect to the selection and use of volunteers.  The Board, through its employees, must maintain control of school programs and school-sponsored activities.   Regulation 5310-10 sets out the manner and conditions in which volunteers may become involved in school life.  


5310-10 | Volunteers in Schools

1.0  Definition:

1.1  Volunteer is an unpaid individual (parent/guardian or other person) who has made a commitment that has been accepted by a school to assist the school in some manner without expectation of compensation.

2.0  Role of Volunteers:

  2.1  The role of the volunteer is to assist the school in providing curricular, extra-curricular and other school related activities and services.

  2.2  Volunteers should function as complementary extensions of the staff responsible for the teaching/learning situation; they should not undertake tasks that require them to make program or educational decisions.

  2.3  Volunteers must not be used to provide services that would normally be provided by an employee.

  2.4  Volunteers must not be assigned tasks that would violate the privacy of students or their families, and shall not be provided access to student records, except that contact information may be provided where required.

  2.5  The selection, use and supervision of volunteers is the responsibility of the Principal.

3.0  Process for Selecting Volunteers

  3.1  All school-related volunteer activities must be approved in advance by the Principal and in consultation with the teacher.

  3.2  All volunteers in the school must be approved by the Principal.  Those who work directly with students or who have, or potentially have, unsupervised access to students must successfully complete a criminal record check process at least every three years, or at the request of the Principal.

  3.3  If a volunteer is charged with or convicted of an offence subsequent to a criminal record check, the volunteer must promptly provide to the school authorization for a further criminal record check.

  3.4  The School will pay the costs of a criminal record check for a volunteer where a fee is charged.

  3.5  Should a criminal record search of a volunteer or information from a law enforcement agency indicate a criminal offence or pending charge, the Principal is authorized to notify the Superintendent or designate who shall determine if the offence or offences are such as to prohibit participation as a school volunteer.

  3.6  All information obtained through the criminal record check is to be treated as confidential and kept on file at the school.

  3.7A volunteer's services may be terminated at the discretion of the Principal or Superintendent.

 

4.0  Orientation of Volunteers

  4.1  Schools using volunteers shall ensure appropriate orientation and ongoing supervision. The orientation process should include:

    4.1.1  A general orientation to the School District;

    4.1.2  Processes of signing in by volunteers;

    4.1.3  Staff responsibilities with respect to volunteers;

    4.1.4  Review of school confidentiality protocol and confidentiality requirements for volunteers;

    4.1.5  Emergency procedures, including emergency evacuation;

    4.1.6  School Code of Conduct and relevant District policies;

    4.1.7  Overview of special programs and/or services at the school;

    4.1.8  Accident procedures including the reporting of incidents; and

    4.1.9  School calendar.

 

5.0  Conduct of Volunteers

Volunteers are required to:

  5.1  Adhere to the bylaws, policies and regulations of the Board;

  5.2  Speak and act with respect;

  5.3  Deal judiciously with students;

  5.4  Respect complete confidentiality with regard to any student matters;

  5.5  Report all incidents of student or personal injury to staff;

  5.6  Maintain confidentiality with regard to personnel matters;

  5.7  Avoid any conflict of interest, whether actual or perceived, between their role as a district volunteer and their other positions or responsibilities;

  5.8  Not be under the influence of or in possession of illicit drugs or alcohol while students are under their care, while on school property, at school-sponsored functions, on extra-curricular trips or at any activities involving students;

  5.9  Direct all questions and concerns through District protocols; and

  5.10  Comply with all relevant and applicable legislation, including the Human Rights Code.

 

6.0  Liability, Insurance and Expenses

  6.1  Volunteers receive limited coverage under the School Protection Program Insurance while engaged in activities authorized by the School District or a school.

  6.2  Where any incident or accident occurs that may conceivably give rise to a claim against a volunteer or the School District, the volunteer must promptly provide all information to the school to enable the school to inform its insurers.  Failure to do so may prejudice coverage.

  6.3  Volunteers may be reimbursed for expenses approved by the Principal.

 



References:  School Act, Sections 7.1, 26.1 and 85


5310-20A | Volunteer Driver Information and Authorization Form

Reference Title View

Volunteer Driver Information and Authorization Form

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6110 | Vision, Mission and Foundational Principles Policy

The Board will develop and maintain the following documents:

  1. A long-term vision statement.
  2. An aspirational mission statement.
  3. A number of foundational principles.

These documents must be consistent with the mandate of the BC Public School System.

In performing its duties, the Board will make decisions and set policies that are consistent with the vision statement, mission statement and foundational principles.

 

REFERENCES 

  • BC School Act 
  • School Trustee Oath of Office Regulation

6130 | Role of the Board Policy

POLICY 

As the corporate body elected by the voters, the Board of Education is responsible for providing educational services to students attending District schools and programs, consistent with the requirements of government legislation and the values and expectations of local communities. 

The decisions of the Board in a properly constituted meeting are those of the corporate Board. 

The Board shall govern in a manner characterized by 

  • the vision of the school district 
  • understanding of and respect for the diversity of our communities 
  • strategic leadership 
  • community, regional, and provincial partnerships 
  • accountability 
  • advocacy for public education 
  • fiscal responsibility 

The Role of the Board is to govern and to set policy for the school district. 

The Superintendent is responsible for management of operations for the school district under the School Act, Regulations, Minister of Education Orders, and Board Policies. 

REFERENCES 

  • BC School Act 
  • School Trustee Oath of Office Regulation

6140 | Role of the Trustee and Trustee Code of Conduct Policy

POLICY 
The Role of the Board is to govern and to set policy for the school district. The School Act gives no individual authority to trustees.   The day-today administration of the education programs and the conduct of the school operations is the responsibility of the Superintendent of Schools and district staff.

As members of the corporate Board, trustees are accountable to the public for the collective decisions of the Board and for the delivery and quality of educational services. A trustee must serve the community as an elected representative; however, the trustee's primary responsibility is to make decisions in the best interest of the district as a member of a corporate Board.  A trustee will not allow any private interest to influence their conduct in public matters and will comply with the requirements of the School Act that relate to conflict of interest.

Trustees will conduct themselves in an ethical and business-like manner.  Specifically, trustees will:

  1. Abide by the policies of the Board and all applicable legislation and regulations, including the School Act and the Oath of Office.
  2. Strive to instill the community's trust in the public education system by carrying out their duties in an open and collaborative manner.
  3. Base decisions on all available facts and vote their honest and unbiased conviction in every case.
  4. Recognize their duty is to represent and advocate for the best interests of all learners in the District.
  5. Do everything possible to maintain the integrity, confidence, and dignity of the office of trustee and not use their position for personal advantage or the advantage of friends and/or family.
  6. Be aware that the public has a greater interest in the opinion of an elected official and use discretion at all times to minimize the impression that an individual trustee's statements reflect the corporate opinion of the Board.
  7. Respect and abide by the majority decisions made by the Board.
  8. Recognize that as individuals, trustees have no authority outside the meetings of the Board unless specifically delegated by the Board.  Trustees may speak about what the Board has decided in a public meeting and individuals may state the reason for their vote.
  9. Declare any conflict of interest and not participate in, vote on, or exert influence on, a decision in which the trustee has a conflict of interest, as outlined in the Conflict of Interest Policy.
  10. Respect confidentiality and not divulge the contents of closed (in-camera) meetings, recognizing that a disclosure could seriously harm the Board's ability to conduct its business.

 

REFERENCES 

  • BC School Act 
  • School Trustee Oath of Office Regulation 
  • 6130 Role of the Board Policy
  • 6260 Conflict of Interest Policy
  • 6310 Role of the Superintendent Policy
  • 6510 Board Communication Policy

6240 | Annual Board Agenda

To fulfil its responsibilities, the Board will follow an annual agenda cycle.

  1. The order of business for regular open board meetings is set out in section 1.3.3 of the Procedural Bylaw. 

 

  1. The order of business for regular in-camera board meetings is as follows:
    1. Approval of Agenda
    2. Approval of Minutes
    3. Human Resources Report
    4. Secretary-Treasurer Report
    5. Other
    6. Legal Items
    7. Information items
    8. Old Business
    9. Items for Release

 

  1. The expected timing of major Board approvals is as follows:

 

Description

J

A

S

O

N

D

J

F

M

A

M

J

Annual Audited Financial Statements

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Learning Improvement Fund Report

 

 

X

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Positions of Special Responsibility

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Organization of Classes Report

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approval of Auditors

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Election of Officers

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Approve Annual Budget Consultation Dates

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

 

Present School Calendar for Consultation

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

 

Amended Annual Budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

 

Approve School Calendar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

Aboriginal Education Partnership Agreement Annual Report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

Approve School Fees and Deposits

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

 

Annual Budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

 

 

Carbon Neutral Action Report

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Daycare Leases

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Capital Budget

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X

Approve Board Meeting Dates

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

X


6250 | District Parents’ Advisory Council Policy

The Board has established the District Parents’ Advisory Council in accordance with Section 8.4(2) of the School Act, in order to provide better communication between the school district and families and to advise the Board on matters relating to education in the school district. 

The District Parents’ Advisory Council shall operate within the terms listed in the School Act, as outlined in school district regulations. 

REFERENCES 

  • BC Ministry of Education School Act, Sections 8.4, 8.5, 67(5.1) 
  • BC Confederation of Parent Advisory Councils 
  • School District regulation, District Parent’s Advisory Council 

6250-10 | District Parent Advisory Council

The Board has authorized a District Parents’ Advisory Council (DPAC) to facilitate communication between school Parent Advisory Councils and to advise the Board on any matter relating to education in the school district. 

The DPAC shall be composed of one elected representative from each school Parent Advisory Council for a maximum term of one year. The Superintendent, or a designate of the Superintendent, and a trustee of the school district may attend any meeting of the DPAC.

The DPAC shall have bylaws governing its meetings and conduct, including the dissolution of the DPAC. 

 

References:
Sections 8.4 and 8.5, School Act
6250               District Parents’ Advisory Council Policy


6260 | Conflict of Interest Policy

RATIONALE/PURPOSE

Trustees, employees, and volunteers are expected to safeguard the public trust and demonstrate integrity in their dealings within the School District. Conflicts of interest, whether actual, possible, or perceived, may impact on the integrity and public image of the Board.

Conflict of interest situations are a regular part of organizational and personal life and cannot be eliminated entirely. The objective of the Conflict of Interest Policy and Regulations is to manage conflict of interest situations successfully and resolve them fairly.

POLICY

The Board expects fair, well-informed decision-making and objective exercise of duties throughout the School District. The ability of a person to make a decision or to carry out duties in the best interest of the School District is sometimes affected by other interests, personal or professional. A conflict of interest is a situation in which a person has a private or personal interest sufficient to appear to influence the objective exercise of his or her official duties and responsibilities.

This Policy applies to trustees and employees. A private or personal interest refers to a person’s
self-interest (e.g., to achieve financial profit, to gain special advantage, or to avoid disadvantage); the interests of a person’s family or business partners; or the interests of another organization in which the person holds a voluntary or paid position.

All trustees and employees are responsible for managing conflict of interest situations, according to the Regulations, in order to ensure that workplace behaviour and decision-making are not influenced inappropriately by conflicting interests.


6260-10 | Conflict of Interest Regulation

The Board expects the highest standards of conduct from trustees and its employees and believes that behaviour in accordance with those standards is paramount in developing and maintaining the public’s trust and confidence in the district. The requirements for compliance with the high standards of conduct established by the Board are a condition of employment.

Trustees and employees are expected to comply with the standards and expectations expressed in this policy and to generally exhibit these qualities and values within their daily activities as they relate to district business.

Trustees and employees are expected to request a determination from the Secretary-Treasurer before engaging in any activity which might reasonably raise questions about a possible conflict of interest.

This policy is not intended to prohibit employees and their immediate families from conducting legitimate business with the Board, but to establish parameters regarding how such business is to be conducted.

A breach of the conflict of interest policy is considered to be a serious breach of a trustees’ or employee’s obligations that may result in discipline or dismissal.

1.0.     The issue of conflict of interest is a delicate one that must be handled with the utmost care and consideration for trustees and employees while adhering to an unwavering commitment to high standards of conduct including but not limited to the following:

  1. Trustees have a duty of loyalty to the district as set out in the School Act.  Employees have a duty of loyalty to the district as their employer. This duty of loyalty requires trustees and employees to provide services to the best of their ability regardless of their own personal perspectives of Board direction or policy. The honesty and integrity of trustees and employees must be above reproach and coupled with impartiality in the conduct of their duties to ensure that their actions avoid public doubt. The actions and conduct of trustees and employees must be such as to instill within the public a sense of trust and confidence in the district.
  2. It is essential that trustees and employees recognize their responsibility to ensure that confidential information received as a result of their position with the district remains confidential, and not be divulged to anyone other than individuals authorized to receive such information. This includes confidential information received verbally or in written or electronic form.  Disclosure of confidential information may put trustees or employees in a position of conflict of interest, and great care must be taken when communicating with individuals inside and outside the district.
  3. A conflict of interest may also occur when a trustee’s or employee’s private affairs or financial interests are in conflict, or could result in a perception of conflict, with the trustee’s or employee’s duties or responsibilities in such a way that:
    • the trustee’s or employee’s ability to act in the public interest could be impaired; or
    • the trustee’s or employee’s actions or conduct could undermine or compromise the public’s confidence in the trustee’s or employee’s ability to discharge their responsibilities, or
    • it diminishes the trust that the public places in the district.

2.0    While the Board recognizes the right of trustees and employees to be involved in activities as citizens of the community, conflict must not exist between trustees and employees’ private interests and the discharge of their district-related duties. Upon accepting a position in the district, trustees and employees must arrange their private affairs in a manner that will prevent conflicts of interest, or the perception of conflicts of interest, from arising.

3.0     Examples of conflicts of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. A trustee or employee uses district property or the employee’s position to pursue personal interests or promote their business interests or those of their family;
  2. A trustee or employee is under obligation to a person who might benefit from or seek to gain special consideration or favour;
  3. A trustee or employee, in the performance of duties, gives preferential treatment to an individual, corporation or organization, including a non-profit organization, in which the trustee or employee, a relative or friend of the trustee or employee has an interest, financial or otherwise;
  4. A trustee or employee benefits from, or is reasonably perceived by the public to have benefited from, the use of information acquired solely by reason of the trustee’s or employee’s position;
  5. A trustee or employee benefits from, or is reasonably perceived by the public to have benefited from, a government transaction over which the trustee or employee can influence decisions (for example, investments, sales, purchases, borrowing, grants, contracts, regulatory or discretionary approvals or appointments);
  6. An employee receives any additional fees or compensation for teaching, tutoring, counseling, coaching, acquiring supplies or other related services provided to students under their individual care;
  7. A trustee or employee requests or accepts from an individual, corporation or organization, directly or indirectly, a personal gift or benefit that arises out of their position in the district other than the exchange of normal hospitality between persons doing business together or gifts to persons participating in public functions.

4.0    Trustees and employees are in a conflict of interest when dealing with direct relatives or individuals who permanently reside with them when the following working relationships exist:

  1. A reporting relationship exists where a trustee or employee has influence, input or decision-making power over the other employee’s performance evaluation, salary, premiums, special permissions, conditions of work and similar matters; or
  2. The working relationship affords an opportunity for collusion between the two employees that would have a detrimental effect on the employer’s interest.

    This restriction on working relationships may be waived provided that the Secretary-Treasurer is satisfied that sufficient safeguards are in place to ensure that the employer’s interests are not compromised.

5.0     Trustees and employees are to disqualify themselves as participants in personnel decisions when their objectivity would be compromised for any reason, or if any benefit or perceived benefit could accrue to them or a family member. For example, trustees and employees are not to participate in staffing actions involving direct relatives or persons living in the same household.

6.0     Trustees and employees may engage in remunerative employment with another employer, carry on a business, receive remuneration from public funds for activities outside their position, or engage in volunteer activities without there being a conflict of interest, provided it does not:

  1. interfere with the performance of their duties as a trustee or employee of the district;
  2. bring the district into disrepute;
  3. represent a conflict of interest or create the reasonable perception of a conflict of interest;
  4. appear to be an official act or to represent district direction or policy;
  5. involve the unauthorized use of work time or district premises, services, equipment or supplies to which they have access by virtue of their position with the district; or
  6. gain an advantage that is derived from their position with the district.

6270 | Whistleblower Protection Policy

RATIONALE/PURPOSE

The Board is committed to the highest standards of integrity, honesty, ethical conduct, and accountability. District codes of conduct and codes of ethicsconflict of interest policies are intended to prevent or deter misconduct or wrongdoing.

At times, these systems may not provide effective safeguards. Employees may be the first to realize that there has been misconduct or wrongdoing. The Board encourages employees and others noted in this Policy, acting in good faith, to report what they reasonably and truly believe to be misconduct or wrongdoing.

POLICY

The Board expects employees and others who have serious and reasonable concerns with respect to misconduct or wrongdoing to come forward and voice those concerns. This Policy applies to trustees, senior executives, administrators, directors, and all other employees of the Board, as well as to all other stakeholders having an interest in the district, including suppliers, consultants, and contractors.

There shall be no retaliation for reporting under this Policy; any acts of retaliation may lead to discipline for the person who is retaliating.

Reports of misconduct or wrongdoing must be made in good faith, without malice or consideration of personal benefit, and when the person reporting has a reasonable basis to believe that the report is true. A report may be either an oral or written report made according to the regulations attached to this Policy.

There shall be no retaliation for reporting under this Policy.A report made in bad faith or without a reasonable and probable basis may lead to disciplinary action.

Reportable activities do not include personnel actions taken in the course of conducting the District’s business where such matters are most appropriately addressed by reference to the applicable collective agreement. 


6270-10 | Whistleblower Protection Regulation


A.       Authority
1. The responsibility for the day to day administration and enforcement of this regulation rests with the Secretary-Treasurer.

2. The provisions of this regulation are independent of, and supplemental to, the provisions of collective agreements between the Board and its Unions      relative to grievance procedures, and to any other terms and conditions of employment.

 

B.       Definitions for the purpose of this regulation:
1.  Board – is the Board of Education of School Board No. 52 (Prince Rupert).

2.  Reporter – refers to all trustees, senior executives and employees of the Board as well as to all other stakeholders having an interest in the Board including suppliers, consultants and contractors.

3. Good Faith – is evident when a report is made without malice or consideration of personal benefit and the reporter has a reasonable basis to believe that the report is true.

4. Reportable Activity – is any unlawful, illegal or inappropriate behaviour and can include:
a.       An unlawful act, whether civil or criminal;
b.       Questionable accounting practices;
c.       Falsifying Board records;
d.       Theft of cash, goods, services or time;
e.       Inappropriate use of district assets;
f.        A decision made for personal gain;
g.       A dangerous practice likely to cause physical harm or damage to property;
h.       Abuse of power or authority; and
i.        Retaliation, repercussion or reprisal for reporting under this regulation.

This list is not all-inclusive but is intended to give an indication of the kind of conduct which may be considered a Reportable Activity.

A Reportable Activity does not include personnel actions taken in the course of conducting the Board’s business where such matters are most appropriately addressed by reference to the applicable collective agreement.

5.  Report – is an oral or written disclosure of information made through the processes described in this regulation.

 

C.        Duty to Disclose
1. The Board expects that a reporter who is aware of any improper activity or wrongdoing will bring the matter to the attention of the Board and give the Board a reasonable opportunity to investigate and take corrective actions appropriate to the circumstances.

 

D.        Protection of Reporter and Employer
1.       Reporter
a.   Any reporter who files a report or raises a concern under this regulation will be protected if the reporter:
          i.         Provides the information in good faith;
          ii.        Believes it to be substantially true;
          iii.       Is not acting maliciously or making false allegations; and
          iv.       Is not seeking any personal or financial gain.

b.   All reports under this regulation will be handled with strict confidentiality; and personally identifiable information from the report will be shared only to the extent necessary to conduct a complete and fair investigation.

c. If a reporter files a report or raises a concern under this regulation, the Board will not retaliate against the reporter in any manner, including dismissal or demotion, because of the reporting.

d. If an investigation reveals that the report was:
    i.     Frivolously, fraudulently or maliciously made; or
    ii.    undertaken for improper motives; or
    iii.    made in bad faith; or
    iv. made without reasonable and probable basis, disciplinary action may be taken.


2.       Employer
a.  Nothing in this regulation will be deemed to diminish or impair the rights of the Board to manage its employees under any policy or collective agreement; or to prohibit any personnel action which otherwise would have been taken regardless of the reporting of information.

 

E.        Reporting a Complaint
1.  Reporters may submit a complaint about any Reportable Activity to the Secretary Treasurer or the Director, Human Resources at the School Board Office, via email or by written letter submitted in confidence to the Secretary Treasurer or the Director, Human Resources.

2. Reports may also be made to the district’s legal counsel:
    Harris & Company LLP Attention: Sari Wiens, #1400, 550 Burrard Street Vancouver, BC  V6C 2B5

3. It is important for reporters making a complaint to understand that the investigation of a complaint will be most effective if they provide their name and contact information when submitting a complaint.

 

F.        Investigation
1. Upon receiving a complaint, the Secretary Treasurer will record the receipt of the complaint and determine whether the matter is, in fact, a Reportable Activity under this regulation.

2. The Secretary Treasurer will, if it is determined that the complaint is a legitimate Reportable Activity, open a file and commence an investigation.

3.  The investigation generally will include, but will not be limited to, discussions with the reporter, the party against whom the allegations have been made and any witnesses, as appropriate.

4.  It is the obligation of all reporters to cooperate in any investigation. Reporters will not obstruct or impede any investigation.

5.  Reasonable actions will be taken to prevent retaliation against anyone making a good faith report or participating in an investigation.

6.  Outside Advisors
    a.  The Secretary Treasurer may enlist Senior Management and / or appropriate outside legal, accounting or other advisors, as appropriate, to assist in conducting any investigation.

    b.  All investigators will be independent and unbiased both in fact and appearance. Investigators have a duty of fairness, objectivity, thoroughness and observance of legal and professional standards.


5.   Those responsible for the investigation will maintain confidentiality of the allegations and the identity of the person involved, subject to the need to conduct a full and impartial investigation and remedy any violations of law or the Board’s policies.

6.   If an investigation establishes that improper activity has occurred, the Board will take immediate and appropriate corrective action.

 

G.       Annual Report
1.    The Secretary-Treasurer will submit to the Board, in an in-camera meeting, an annual summary of actions taken under this regulation. The summary will include reports received and acted upon during the school year, July 1st to June 30th.


6310 | Role of the Superintendent Policy

POLICY 
The Superintendent is the Chief Executive Officer of the school district and has, under the direction of the Board, general supervision of all of the public schools and of all the personnel and various departments of the school system. The Superintendent is responsible for management of the schools under the School Act, Regulations, Minister of Education Orders and Board policies, and is accountable to the Board. 

At the discretion of the Superintendent, the exercise of any powers and the discharge of any duties imposed upon the Superintendent by Board policies or by vote of the Board may be delegated to other district personnel. The delegation of power or duty, however, will not relieve the Superintendent of responsibility for the action taken under such delegation. 

All Board authority delegated to staff shall be delegated through the Superintendent of Schools. All authority and accountability of staff, as far as the Board is concerned, is considered to be the authority and accountability of the Superintendent of Schools. 

REFERENCES 

  • BC School Act 
  • School Trustee Oath of Office Regulation

6315 | Delegation to the Superintendent Policy

The Superintendent or designate shall authorize expenditure of funds within the limit of an adopted budget, in agreement with Board policy, school district procedures, and legal requirements, and subject to any direction that the Board may give the Superintendent regarding expenditure limitations or reporting requirements on specific sections of the budget.

The Superintendent shall establish procedures which clearly delegate authority to expend funds within each budget program, establish accountability for those expenditures, and outline measures of control.

No individual or group delegated authority and accountability for a program shall expend funds beyond the budget for that program without the written authorization of the Superintendent or designate.

The Superintendent is authorized to make necessary adjustments or over-expenditures to handle emergencies, provided that the Board is advised as soon as possible.

The Superintendent may authorize adjustments required to accommodate increased or reduced revenues. Such adjustments shall be reported to the Board.

The Superintendent or designate may approve transfers that repurpose program budgets, given changes in educational or business realities, changes in strategy or as approved by the Board. Transfers of any kind shall be made in keeping with prevailing accounting regulation and Ministry directive as given in the Accounting and Reporting Guidelines of the Ministry’s K-12 District Financial Accountability Website.

 

REFERENCES 
School Act: Sections 110, 111, 112, 112.1, 113, 114, 115, 117, 118. 
Policy 6310, Role of Superintendent 
Policy 7220, Purchasing and Tendering 


6420 | School Plans Policy

The Board must approve a school plan for every school in the district, each year (School Act, Section 8.3).  The school plan so approved must be made available to the parents of students attending that school.

Development of the school plan must follow Ministry of Education and school district regulations.


 

Related Policies and Regulations:
BC Ministry of Education School Act, 8.3

 


6510 | Board Communications Policy

POLICY 
Board communications support the Board’s vision, mission, and goals, while building and promoting trusting, effective relationships between the Board, and local communities and partner groups. 

Board communications provide the means for local communities and partner groups to participate in district planning and to be informed about educational issues and services. The Board shall actively seek and listen to the voices of the District’s internal and community partners with respect to the District’s vision, mission, operating principles, goals, policy, and planning. 

Regulations to this Policy guide communication links between the Board and other entities.

The Board Chair is the primary spokesperson for the Board.  The Board Chair or designate speaks on matters such as governance, policy, Board decisions, and other areas as identified in the Regulations that accompany this Policy. 

The Superintendent of Schools is the primary spokesperson on matters such as the leadership and operation of the District. The Superintendent or designate speaks on educational, administrative, management, fiscal, planning, and organizational matters of the District, and other areas identified in the Regulations that accompany this Policy. 

REFERENCES
Policy 6130, Role of the Board Policy
Policy 6140, Role of the Trustee and Trustee Code of Conduct Policy
Policy 6310, Role of the Superintendent Policy


6610 | Making Policy

Policy development is a key responsibility of the Board. Policies constitute the will of the Board in determining how the District will be operated. Policies provide effective direction and guidelines for the action of the Board, Superintendent, Secretary-Treasurer, staff and students. Policies also serve as sources of information and guidelines to all who may be interested in or connected with the operation of the District. Adoption of new Board Policies or revision of existing Policies is solely the responsibility of the Board.

The Board shall be guided in its approach to policy making by ensuring adherence to the requirements necessary to provide public education and compliance with the School Act, other provincial legislation and other contractual agreements (for example, the Aboriginal Education Partnership Agreement). Further, the Board believes that the development and review of policies are enhanced when the process allows for the meaningful involvement of staff and other interested groups and persons.

Board policies shall provide an appropriate balance between the responsibility of the Board to develop the broad guidelines to guide the District and the opportunity for the Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer to exercise professional judgment in the administration of the District.

The Board shall adhere to the following stages in its approach to policy making:

1.  Planning
The Board, in cooperation with the Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer, shall assess the need for a policy.  This may be as a result of its own monitoring activities or on the suggestion of others. The critical attributes of the policy will be developed in the planning stage.

2.  Development
The Board may develop the policy itself or could delegate the responsibility for development to the Superintendent and/or Secretary-Treasurer. Each policy statement must be precise enough to show clearly the Board's intent and consider the need for the Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer to have discretion in dealing with particular cases. The process for the development and review of policies will allow for the participation of interested and concerned groups and individuals as appropriate to their circumstances.

3.  Implementation
The Board is responsible for the implementation of policies governing its own processes. The Board and Superintendent share the responsibility for implementation of policies relating to the Board-Superintendent relationship. The Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer are responsible for the implementation of all other policies.

4.  Evaluation
The Board, in cooperation with the Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer, shall evaluate each policy in a timely manner in order to determine whether or not it is meeting its intended purpose.

 

References:

6610-10 Making Policy and Regulations


6610-10 | Making Policy and Regulations

1. Overview and Definitions 

  1.1. The Board is concerned with the proper discharge of its responsibilities under the School Act and with the wide exercise of the powers which the Act confers. It believes it can discharge its responsibilities and exercise its powers best by limiting itself as far as possible to the determination of policy governing all aspects of the operation of the school system and holding the Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer responsible for ensuring that the Board's decisions are carried out. 

  1.2. The following definitions apply within this regulation: 
          1.2.1. A “Policy” is a principle of governance selected to guide and direct present and future decisions. Policies should be broad enough to indicate a line of action to be followed by the administration and narrow enough to give clear guidance. Policies are guides for action by the Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer, who then implement appropriate Regulations. 
          1.2.2. A “Regulation” is a specific direction to school district personnel and guidance to parents for accomplishing a direction established in Policy. 

2. Planning 

  2.1. The Policy Committee will approve a work plan for the development of new Policies and for the review of existing Policies. 

  2.2. The work plan will take into account:
         2.2.1. requests for new Policies or changes to Policies; 
         2.2.2. changes to statutory requirements; and 
         2.2.3. research by the Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer. 

  2.3. The Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer will approve a work plan for the development of new Regulations and for the review of existing Regulations.Page 2 of 3 

3. Development 

  3.1. The Policy Committee will review proposed drafts of new Policies and of amendments to existing Policies. The Committee will then recommend these drafts to the Board at a regularly scheduled Board meeting. 

  3.2. When appropriate, the Superintendent or Secretary-Treasurer will seek legal or other advice on the intent and/or wording of a Policy. 

  3.3. The Board of Education endorses the process of involvement and therefore in reviewing Policies shall receive input from all concerned groups. If and when a new Policy is drafted or an existing Policy is amended, draft copies will be sent to all concerned groups for their input; and a waiting period of two weeks will be allowed for this input; before final adoption by the Board. Concerned groups will include: 
         3.3.1. Trustees 
         3.3.2. PRPVPA (administrative officers) 
         3.3.3. PRDTU (teachers)
         3.3.4. IUOE (support staff)
         3.3.5. DPAC (parents)
         3.3.6. Aboriginal Education Committee 
         3.3.7. other community partners, when appropriate. 

  3.4. The Policy Committee will consider all input received and then review revised drafts of new Policies and of amendments to existing Policies. The Committee will then report on the input received and recommend the revised drafts to the Board at a regularly scheduled Board meeting. 

  3.5. The development of Regulations is the responsibility of the Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer. All Regulations must be in accordance with Policy. When appropriate, draft Regulations or amendments to existing Regulations will accompany proposed Policies and concerned groups will be asked to provide their input on these draft Regulations. 

  3.6. Normally, the Board will not be concerned with Regulations. In some cases, however, it may provide the Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer with advice regarding Regulations. 

  3.7. Any additions to written Regulations or updates to the Regulation manual will be communicated to the Board in a timely manner.Page 3 of 3 

4. Implementation 

  4.1. Adoption of a Policy will be by Board motion. 

  4.2. Adoption of a Regulation will be effected by the publication and distribution of the Regulation by the Superintendent and the Secretary-Treasurer. 

  4.3. The approval of a Policy or Regulation for inclusion in the manual suspends any previously adopted Policy or Regulation relating to the issue covered in the approved Policy or Regulation. 

  4.4. All Policies or Regulations in effect shall remain in effect until new or revised Policies or Regulations are issued.  

  4.5. All Policies and Regulations shall be posted on the District's website and distributed electronically to all principals and Board Office staff. 

5. Evaluation 

  5.1. Policy making is a process, not a project to be finished within a year or two. It is a way of life of a Board of Education. So long as the Board spends money, operates schools, hires teachers and educates children, it will need to make Policies to guide itself and those for whom it is responsible. 

  5.2. The Board of Education will, through the Policy Committee, review each Policy on a regular basis. 

  5.3. The Superintendent and Secretary-Treasurer will review each Regulation on a regular basis. 

6. Board Decisions 

  6.1. In the absence of existing policy, the Board may make decisions, by resolution, on matters affecting the administration, management, and operation of the District. Such decisions carry the weight of policy until such time as specific written policy is developed.


6710 | Records Management

The Board of Education shall establish a Records Management Program.

The creation of records and allowable access to records is subject to the requirements of Bylaw #7 - Freedom of Information/Protection of Privacy Bylaw.

Where records are maintained in an electronic form, there must be a method of producing visible and legible records that will provide adequate information for the intended purpose of the record.

The maintenance of records for minimum periods of time is subject to the requirements of federal and provincial legislation.

Once records are past the applicable retention period, the person responsible for the records is authorized to destroy them once that person is satisfied that:

  1. the records are of no further use (including any use related to possible litigation); and
  2. they have no historical or archival value.

Records which contain personal or confidential information should be destroyed in a manner that retains the confidentiality of the records.

 

Related Bylaws, Policies & Regulations:

Bylaw #7        Freedom of Information/Protection of Privacy Bylaw

6710-10         Regulation and Procedures: Records Management Program

6710-10         Regulation and Procedures: Records Management Program – Schedule

6710-20         Student Records


6710-10 | Records Management Regulation

1.    Overview and Definitions

1.1.    The Records Management Program will facilitate the retrieval, retention, long-term preservation and destruction of records in accordance with the District’s legal, administrative and operational obligations.

1.2.    The following definitions apply within this regulation:
1.2.1.    A “Record” is “all recorded information regardless of physical format, which is received, created, deposited or held.  Records include books, documents, maps, drawings, photographs, letters, vouchers, papers and any other thing on which information is recorded or stored by graphic, electronic, mechanical or other means, but does not include computer programs or any other mechanism that produces records.”  (Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy legislation.)
1.2.2.    “Student Personal Information” includes any information that identifies a student including the student’s name, address and telephone number, Personal Education Number (PEN), assessments, results and educational records.
1.2.3.    “Employee Personal Information” is any recorded information about an identifiable employee other than information enabling an employee to be contacted at work (including name, position name, district telephone number, district address, district email and district fax number).

1.3.    The following acts (and regulations thereto) are part of the Records Management Program:

1.3.1.    Canada Pension Act
1.3.2.    Document Disposal Act;
1.3.3.    Education Finance Act;
1.3.4.    Employment Insurance Act.
1.3.5.    Employment Standards Act;
1.3.6.    Excise Act;
1.3.7.    Financial Disclosure Act;
1.3.8.    Financial Information Act;
1.3.9.    Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act (FOIPPA);
1.3.10.    Income Tax Act; and
1.3.11.    School Act.

 
2.    Creation and Correction of Records

2.1.    In accordance with FOIPPA, the District has the legal authority to collect personal information that relates directly to, and is necessary for, it’s operating programs or activities, or as otherwise authorized by legislation.  Personal information will be collected directly from the individual the information is about, unless another method of collection is authorized by the individual or by legislation.

2.2.    FOIPPA gives employees the right to request that personal information on file be removed or corrected.  This procedure is not intended to be in conflict with, or supersede, an employee’s rights outlined in a collective agreement.

2.2.1.    Employees may request the district to correct or remove entries in their personal records.  Such a request must be made in writing, either on the forms provided or in a letter.
2.2.2.    The Secretary-Treasurer (who may consult with the Superintendent before making a decision) will make a decision on the request.
2.2.3.    If the request is complied with, no Record of the request should be retained in the employee file.
2.2.4.    If the district denies the request, the applicant will be informed of the right to appeal to the Commissioner of Information and Privacy.

3.    Access to Records

3.1.    FOIPPA

3.1.1.    Disclosure of personal information occurs when the information is provided to an external or third party.  Such disclosure must comply with Part 3 of FOIPPA.
3.1.2.    Personal information may be disclosed to a third party if the individual who is the subject of the information has provided written consent in accordance with FOIPPA regulation.  In the case of a student under age nineteen (19), such consent shall be provided by the student’s parent or guardian.
3.1.3.    FOIPPA provides a general right of access to any record in the custody or under the control of the district, including records containing personal information, subject to certain exceptions that are set out in Part 2 of FOIPPA.
3.1.4.    FOIPPA regulation allows a parent or guardian to access personal information on behalf of a child under the age of nineteen (19).
3.1.5.    All employees working with records must ensure the security and confidentiality of those records, including security of access to records.

3.2.    School Act
3.2.1.    Section 1 of the School Act defines a student record as:
"student record" means a record of information in written or electronic form pertaining to
(a) a student or francophone student, or
(b) a child registered under section 13 with a school or francophone school,
but does not include
(c) a record prepared by a person if that person is the only person with access to the record, or
(d) a record of a report under section 14 (1) or 16 (3) (b) of the Child, Family and Community Service Act or of information that forms the basis for a report under section 14 (1) of that Act;

3.2.2.    The School Act provides a student and parent or guardian with a right of access to copies of academic records and other student records (Section 9), as well as information about the student’s progress, attendance and behavior at school (Section 7).
3.2.3.    Section 79 of the School Act addresses privacy in the context of student records.

3.3.    Student Personal Information

3.3.1.    District employees may disclose Student Personal Information to other district employees where such disclosure is necessary for the performance of the duties of the employee.
3.3.2.    District employees may disclose Student Personal Information to other school districts where such disclosure is necessary for educational purposes.
3.3.3.    In accordance with FOIPPA, other ministries, school districts or law enforcement agencies may have access to personal information where this is necessary for the provision of their services.
3.3.4.    Students and/or parents or guardians must authorize the disclosure of Student Personal Information for purposes ancillary to educational programs such as newsletter publications, website postings, honor roll lists, team rosters or yearbooks.  This authorization will be obtained on the form “Authorization for Disclosure of Student Personal Information” on an annual basis at the beginning of each school year.  Parents and/or guardians have the right to opt out of providing Student Personal Information that is not directly related to a student’s educational program or necessary for the district’s operational activities.
3.3.5.    When a school or the district collects Student Personal Information or personal information about students’ families, parents and/or guardians should be informed of the purpose for which the information is being collected.

3.4.    Employee Personal Information

3.4.1.    The collection, use, disclosure, access to and disposal of Employee Personal Information is governed by FOIPPA.  All provisions of FOIPPA that apply to Employee Personal Information in the district’s custody or control will be observed.
3.4.2.    Access to an employee’s Records can be gained during normal business hours upon appointment with the Secretary-Treasurer.  The employee’s Records are available to:
3.4.2.1.    The employee, in the presence of designated staff;
3.4.2.2.    Other parties, such as legal counsel of the employee with the specific written consent of the employee; and
3.4.2.3.    The employee’s supervisor, only in the course for performing their job functions, on an as-needed basis.

3.5.    The Secretary-Treasurer is authorized to establish fees for the retrieval and reproduction of Records.

4.    Security of Records

4.1.    Records must be dealt with in a responsible, efficient, ethical and legal manner.  All district employees are expected to maintain and secure Records in a manner that respects the privacy of employees, students and students’ families.  Users of computer network resources should not disseminate Records to anyone not covered by a confidentiality agreement.  Precautions should be taken to ensure that Records are protected from unauthorized access, use and disclosure.

4.2.    Paper Records
4.2.1.    Reasonable security precautions should be in place, such as: locked storage; removal of personal information from work areas; proper shredding of binned material.
4.2.2.    Personal information should not be discussed in any physical location that may compromise confidentiality.
4.2.3.    Posting of personal information such as exam results should not contain student identifiers.
4.2.4.    A “CONFIDENTIAL” warning should be listed on fax covers to prevent information from being accessed and viewed by an unauthorized party if a fax is obtained in error.  Highly sensitive material should not be faxed.
4.2.5.    Paper Records due for destruction should be securely shredded and disposed of.

4.3.    Electronic Records

4.3.1.    Where Records are maintained in an electronic form, the system must include a method of producing visible and legible Records that will provide adequate information for the intended purpose of the Records.
4.3.2.    Internet and internal computer network systems must be used in accordance with Regulation 2.5: “Use of School District’s Communications Systems.”
4.3.3.    Security, such as passwords and data encryption, must be in place for Records stored, printed or transferred by computers and electronic mobile devices.
4.3.4.    Passwords should not be shared with coworkers, nor should coworkers log in with another employee’s password.
4.3.5.    Laptops and other electronic devices, such as Personal Digital Assistants, should either be kept on one’s person or be secured in safe physical storage.
4.3.6.    Sensitive Records such as pictures of students or employees, or personal information such as home addresses and phone numbers, should not be transmitted, exposed on the Internet or published without consent.

5.    Retention of Records

5.1.    Management Program – Regulation – Schedule outlines the minimum length of time that Records must be retained.  The schedule identifies who is responsible for their retention and destruction.
5.2.    The maintenance of records for minimum periods of time is subject to the requirements of federal and provincial legislation.  It is recognized that legislation as enacted may dictate other provisions and periods of time and take precedence over the time periods specified in the schedule that accompanies this regulation.

6.    Destruction of Records

6.1.    Once a Record is past the minimum period of time for retention, the person identified in Management Program – Regulation – Schedule as being responsible for the Record is authorized to destroy it once they are satisfied that the Record:

6.1.1.    Is of no further use;
6.1.2.    Has no historical or archival value; or
6.1.3.    Is not the subject matter of litigation.

6.2.    Records which contain personal or confidential information should be destroyed in a manner that retains the confidentiality of the Records.

 

REGULATION AND PROCEDURES: Records - Schedule

The following retention schedule outlines the minimum amount of time that School District records must be retained and who is responsible for their retention and destruction.

 

Board Records

Responsibility: Secretary-Treasurer
 

Board Policy                                                                        Permanent

Agendas of Regular and Special Board Meetings      Permanent

List of Electors                                                                    2 years after the year of creation

Minutes                                                                                Permanent

Notice of Meetings                                                             1 year

Oaths and Declaration of Trustees                                For term of office

Financial Disclosures                                                       While in office or in the employ of the Board

School Trustees List                                                         While current

Debenture and by-law register                                        Permanent

Debenture and coupons redeemed                              6 years after the year redeemed

Contracts with Senior Staff                                               6 years after the year employee leaves district

 

Communications/Information and Privacy

Responsibility: Communications Office

 

Freedom of Information Requests                      2 years after the calendar year of creation

Requests to Review Freedom of Information    5 years after investigation, review, inquiry

Decisions                                                                 or adjudication is complete and order has been issued

Freedom of Information requests to correct      2 years after the personal information has

personal information                                              been updated, annotated, or request has been transferred to another public body.

Annual Report as required by the School Act    Permanent

District publications and newsletters                  Permanent

 

Financial Records

Responsibility: Director of Finance

 

Annual budget and summary supporting documents             Permanent

Auditor's reports                                                      Permanent

Cancelled cheques                                                6 years after the year of creation

Cheque duplicates, invoices                                6 years after the year of creation

Requisitions, purchase orders                            2 years after the year of creation

Employee Travel Claims                                       6 years after the year of creation

Ministry of Education financial information reports       Permanent

General ledger                                                         Permanent

Invoices billed                                                          6 years after the year of creation

Subsidiary ledgers and journals                          6 years after the year of creation

Receipts issued                                                      6 years after the year issued

Bank statements, debit and credit notes            6 years after the year of creation

Deposit books                                                         6 years after the year of creation

Loans, authorization                                               6 years or term of loan, if longer

Loans, cancelled notes                                         6 years after the year of creation

Stop payment orders                                              1 year after the year of creation

 

Facilities Records

Responsibility: Director of Operations

 

Rental of facilities                                                    1 year after the year of rental

Appraisal and inventory records                           6 years after the year of asset disposal

Authorization for expenditure of capital funds    6 years after the year capital plan completed

Building plans and specifications (with related            6 years after the year of asset disposal

change, guarantees, bonds, liens and

valuable correspondence)

Land titles, deeds and plans                                6 years after the year of asset disposal

Mortgages and leases                                           6 years after expiration of term

Referenda Data (subsequent changes,             6 years after the year of asset disposal

orders-in-council, etc.)

 

General Records

Responsibility: Each Principal, Director, Senior Staff member

 

General Correspondence                                     2 years after the year of creation

 

Human Resource Records

Responsibility: Director of Instruction – Human Resources

 

Applications                                                              1 year after position is filled

Job Competitions                                                    1 year after position is filled, with selected longer retention

Collective Agreements with Unions                    Permanent

Contracts with individual employees                  6 years after the year employee leaves district

Employee files                                                         6 years after the year employee leaves district

First Aid Certification                                               6 years after the year employee leaves the district

Leave records                                                          6 years after the employee leaves school district

Individual grievance files                                       Permanent

Letters of discipline                                                According to collective agreement or 6 years after the year employee leaves district

Personnel File                                                         6 years after the year employment ceases

Reference checks                                                   1 year after position is filled

SDS                                                                            1 year after employment ceases

SDS - TOC Dispatch                                               1 year after employment ceases

Seniority Lists                                                          Permanent

Support Staff Subtitutes                                         1 year

Unsolicited resumes                                              6 months

Violent incident reports                                          6 years after the year of creation

Employee WCB forms                                            6 years after the year employment ceases

 

Information Systems

Responsibility: Director of Information Technology

 

User ID's                                                                   When user is removed from the system

System Problem-Tracking                                     When user is removed from the system

 

Responsibility: Each Principal, Director of Operations (for closed buildings)

Video tapes                                                              1 year after year of creation, as needed

 

Insurance Records

Responsibility: Secretary-Treasurer

 

Incident Reports                                                      1 year or until finalized

Claims                                                                       6 years after claim settled for adults; 2 years after age of majority is reached for individuals under 19 years

Insurance Policies                                                  Permanent

 

Payroll Records

Responsibility: Director of Finance

 

Employee payroll file                                              6 years after the year employee leaves district

Employee payroll register                                      6 years after the year employee leaves district

Employee attendance records                             6 years after the year employment ceases

Payroll benefits                                                        6 years after the year employment ceases

Payroll data base                                                    6 years after the year employment ceases

Payroll deductions                                                  6 years after the year employment ceases

 

Purchasing Records

Responsibility: Each Principal, Director, Senior Staff member

 

Quotations and relative correspondence           6 years after the year of creation

Purchasing contracts                                             6 years after the year of creation

Requisitions and purchase orders                     6 years after the year of creation

 

Student Records

Responsibility: Director of Information Technology

 

Student Information System Data                        Permanent

 

Responsibility: School Principals

Permanent Record Cards                                     Permanent

Attendance Reports and Registers                     Permanent

 

Responsibility: Director of Instruction

Cross-Boundary Attendance Requests              1 year after decision is made about the request

 

Responsibility: Director of Instruction - Secondary

Provincial Scholarships and District Awards     Permanent

 

Responsibility: Secondary School Principals

Senior Secondary School Statement                  Permanent

 

Responsibility: Teachers

Teachers' student files                                           1 year after teacher no longer has student (selected records transferred to Primary Student File)

Responsibility: District Principal, Student Support Services

Other student records                                            Useful life of record

 

Responsibility: District Principal, Aboriginal Education

Other student records                                            Useful life of record

 

Transportation Data

Responsibility: Secretary-Treasurer

 

Student Bus Registration Forms                         1 year after the year of creation

Transportation Assistance Forms                       1 year after the year of creation

School Bus Behaviour Report                              1 year after the year of creation

School bus videotapes                                          1 year after the year of creation

Vehicle maintenance forms                                  Life of bus

Pre-trip forms                                                           3 months

Driver time logs                                                       6 months


6710-20 | Student Records

The Board approves the maintenance of student records pertaining to the student's health, scholastic and vocational aptitude, school achievement, psycho-educational assessments, and comments on personal and social development. This information should serve three basic purposes: 

  1. To assist teachers, students and parents in planning and organizing instruction best suited to the needs of the student. 
  2. To provide teachers, students and parents with information that would improve the decision-making process involving educational and vocational choice. 
  3. To assist the student in the maintenance and transfer of such records as may be required when applying for employment or post-secondary training. 

The Board directs that care must be exercised in the maintenance and transfer of student records. It is essential that schools should be able to provide sound reasons for the collection of any data, and should have sound procedures in place to ensure the confidentiality of these records. 

Student records must be kept confidential and released only in accordance with Regulations, court orders and if specifically directed by the Board. 

Permanent Student Records 

  1. The Permanent Student Record shall be kept at the school where the student attends. The Permanent Student Record shall be maintained subject to the Ministry of Education requirements. 
  2. Backup records on the electronic devices should be maintained in order to effect rapid review and retrieval as required. 
  3. The Permanent Student Record will be reviewed by the school personnel at least once a year to ensure that the information contained therein is up-to-date and complete. 
  4. Should the student transfer to another public school in the Province, the Permanent Student Record will be mailed directly to the Principal of that school. If the new school is outside the Province of British Columbia, or a private school, a copy of the Permanent Student Record may be sent if requested by the parent, legal guardian, or student if over 16, to the appropriate school. The original Permanent Student Record should be kept in the school. 
  5. The school may provide information to an employer, agency or educational institution regarding a student's Permanent Student Record at the request or prior written approval of the student or the permission of the parent or legal guardian of the student in the case of a minor. 

Student's File 

  1. A student file should be kept in the school that contains detailed descriptions of student growth and development. Only such information which will serve to assist teachers in better meeting the needs of the student should be recorded and kept in this file. Medical information, psycho-educational assessments, and counsellor reports should not be kept in this file. Information regarding the student’s scholastic and vocational aptitude, maturity, ability to relate to others, hobbies and outside interests and any other factors which are perceived to affect educational, personal and social development may also be kept in this file. Where student weaknesses in school achievement, or in personal and social development are observed, an indication of those methods used to overcome any problem areas may be noted in this file. If suspension from school has been necessary, letters and reports documenting the procedures followed will also be kept in the school's student file. 
  2. Counsellors and/or teachers should review the student's file each year to ensure that the information is up-to-date and complete. Any information that is no longer valid should be destroyed upon the authorization of the Principal. 
  3. The content of all student's files will be kept for legal reasons for at least two years after the student has left school or graduated. In cases where the student leaves before graduation, the Board, in addition to keeping the records for two years, must ensure that the student has reached the age of majority (age 19). 
  4. Teachers and authorized District Staff in consultation with the counsellor or Principal are permitted access to the student's file and Permanent Student Record. 
  5. Students or parents are permitted to examine their file and Permanent Student Record in the presence of a Principal or counsellor who is qualified to interpret the contents of the file. 
  6. Medical information, psycho-educational assessments, counsellor reports, (discussed in #1 above) raw test/assessment data, and other information of a sensitive nature, such as reports of social workers, psychiatrists, etc. should normally be shared only in a conference attended by professional staff. Where written reports are necessary they shall be prepared in summary form and transmitted under confidential cover. Where these reports and other confidential information are required for educational planning at the school site they are to be kept in a separate, locked filing cabinet under the authority of the school Principal. 
  7. In single parent custodial situations, either parent is entitled to records access unless there is a court order restricting access. 

  8. Access to student information shall be provided to a person planning or providing for the provision of health, social or other support services in accordance with section 106 of the School Act. This includes the Board's insurer for the purpose of meeting a claim under certain conditions. 

  9. Access to a student's file will not be granted to any agency outside of the school system unless authorized by a parent or guardian signature. For a student 16 years or older the authorization of either the parent/guardian or student is required. Where there is an issue of student protection from abuse or neglect under the “Child, Family and Community Service Act” the authorization of the parent/guardian is not required by the investigating agency (i.e. Ministry of Children and Family Development, R.C.M.P.). In the case of a student’s death, the school will retain the student’s file for a period of 3 years so that school staff members have access to the file in the event of an investigation by an outside agency such as the Children’s Commission. After 3 years the file should be forwarded to the District Office. 

  10. The school may provide information to an employer regarding a student's school record at the request or prior written approval of the student or the permission of the parent or legal guardian of the student. 

Student Support Services (Confidential) Files: 

The Board approves the maintenance of a confidential file for students appropriately designated to receive Special Education services. Further the Board directs that information about students with special education needs be maintained and transmitted in accordance with Permanent Student Records (M638/95) and Individual Education Plan (M190/01) Ministerial Orders. 

Confidential files will be maintained on appropriately designated students in the following Special Education categories and/or receiving these services: 

  • Physiotherapy/Occupational Therapy 
  • District Counselling Services 
  • Students with Mild Intellectual Disabilities 
  • Students with Moderate to Severe/Profound Intellectual Disabilities 
  • Students with Learning Disabilities 
  • Students Who are Gifted 
  • Students Requiring Behaviour Support/Mental Illness 
  • Students Requiring Intensive Behaviour Interventions/Serious Mental Illness 
  • Students who are Physically Dependent with Multiple Needs 
  • Students who are Deafblind 
  • Students with Physical Disabilities or Chronic Health Conditions 
  • Students with Visual Impairments 
  • Students who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing 
  • Students with Autism

These confidential Student Support Services files will be kept at the School District Office and will contain some or all of the following documents: 

  1. Medical Records 
  2. Minutes of School Based Team Meetings 
  3. Psycho-educational Assessments 
  4. Speech-Language Assessments 
  5. Audiologist Assessments 
  6. Counsellor Reports 
  7. Reports or Assessments from other Ministries (i.e. MCFD, Probation Services, Health) 
  8. Individual Education Plans 
  9. Other information as required for educational planning for the student. 

A duplicate file may be kept at the Student Support Services office in a locked filing cabinet. The Department Head, Student Support Services, is responsible for the maintenance of these confidential Student Support Services files. 

The Board shall retain the Student Support Services file for a period of 55 years from the date the student withdraws or graduates from school. 

Where the student transfers to a public school within the province, upon the request of that School Board (which includes a written request from the student’s parent/guardian), the Board shall transfer the confidential Student Support Services file to that School Board. 

Where the former student is enrolled in an independent school or an educational institute outside the province and the Board receives a file transfer request (which includes a written request from the parent/guardian), the Board shall first make a copy of the documents in the file, then transfer the copied file to that school. The board shall maintain the original until the child returns to a provincial public school or for 55 years. 


7 | Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy

Whereas Section 76.1 of the Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Act, S.B.C. 1992, c.61 (unproclaimed amendments as of October 3, 1993),(hereinafter called the "Act") states:

 

"A local public body, by bylaw or other legal instrument by which the local public body acts,

(a)        must designate a person or group of persons as the head of the local public body for the purposes of the Act,

(b)       may authorize any person to perform any duty or exercise any function under this Act of the person or group of persons designated as the head of the local public body, and

(c)        may set any fees the local public body requires to be paid under section 75."

 

Now therefore the Board enacts as follows:

 

1.         As required under Section 76.1 (a) of the Act, the Board of Trustees designates the Superintendent of Schools as the official head of the school district for the purposes of the Act.

2.         As permitted under Section 76.1 (b) of the Act, the Board of Trustees authorizes the Secretary-Treasurer, Chief Accountant and Director of Instruction to be responsible for the administration of the Act and to make operational decisions.  The Secretary-Treasurer, Chief Accountant and Director of Instruction are authorized to issue procedures required to support the district's administration of the Act.

3.         As permitted under Section 76.1 (c) of the Act, the Board of Trustees adopts the schedule of fees as set out in Freedom of Information and Protection of Privacy Regulations, B.C. Reg. 323/93 dated September 22, 1993.

4.         This bylaw may be cited as School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) Freedom of Information/Protection of Privacy Bylaw.

 

 

 

 

 

Adopted:  January 31, 1995


7110 | Trustee Remuneration and Expense Allowance Policy

RATIONALE/PURPOSE

The School Act mandates Boards to authorize payment of Trustee Remuneration and an Expense Allowance.

 

POLICY

  1. The Trustees of School District No. 52 (Prince Rupert) shall be paid an annual amount as Trustee, Vice Chair or Chair, as the case may be.  The annual amount will be paid in twelve (12) equal instalments.
  2. The annual amount will be determined by computing the average amount paid to Trustees, Vice Chair and Chair, respectively, of the School District comprising the Northwest and Northeast Regions.  The data used in the computation will be the data supplied by the British Columbia School Trustee Association.
  3. The annual amount will be revised in even numbered years and the rate will be made effective January 1st of that year.
  4. Trustees will receive a monthly allowance of $75 ($900 per annum) for telecommunication costs incurred by the Trustee.
  5. A Travel and Subsistence Allowance will be paid pursuant to Policy 7120 to Trustees traveling on Board business.

 

REFERENCE:

School Act – Section 71


7120 | Travel and Subsistence Allowance Policy

Rationale/Purpose 
The Board of Education recognizes that there is value in having trustees and employees travel to and participate in local and provincial programs or events that are relevant to their responsibilities.

Policy
Trustees and authorized personnel will be reimbursed for travel and associated costs in accordance with the regulations to this policy. There will also be regulations for the reimbursement of the use of personal vehicles on school district business.


7120-10 | Travel and Subsistence Allowance

1.0    Eligibility:
   1.1    The Board will pay travel and subsistence to trustees and authorized employees of the Board travelling on the business of the Board according to regulations.  

2.0    Principles:
   2.1    The method of travel shall be selected with due regard for economy in keeping with the efficient dispatch of the Board's business.
   2.2    Prior written authorization for travel by employees must be obtained from the persons designated in Regulation 7120-20 and must fall within approved budgets.

3.0     Procedures:
   3.1    Hotel room charges including spouses will be accepted where a special room rate applies to single or double occupancy.
   3.2    Hotel movie rentals, loss of income, mini bar charges and child care expenses must not be claimed.
   3.3    Payment will be made for private lodging at $30.00 per night in lieu of hotel expenses when on School District business.
   3.4    If travel is by private automobile the owner may claim the lesser of 
       3.4.1    car mileage at the rates in Section 3.5 (below), or
       3.4.2    the equivalent of return air fare for each of the authorized persons transported.
   3.5    Mileage allowance will be paid:
       3.5.1    For teachers, at the rate set in the collective agreement; and
       3.5.2    For trustees and all other employees, at the rate set by the BC School Trustees Association.
   3.6    Whether or not meals are charged to the room, the maximum allowable claim will be at the per diem rate for meals set by the BC School Trustees Association.
   3.7    For each trip, the Secretary-Treasurer is authorized to make an advance covering the estimated cost of subsistence and a travel voucher for transportation.
   3.8    Within one week following the completion of the trip, each person concerned shall submit an expense account report in a form acceptable to the Secretary-Treasurer.  Receipts will be required for hotel only unless a travel fare has been paid personally.

REFERENCES: 
Policy 7120 – Travel and Mileage Expense Reimbursement


7120-20 | Travel and Subsistence Allowance - Approvals

1.0 Authorization for travel and expense account claims shall be approved as follows: 

Approval for: Provided by:
Board Chair Secretary - Treasurer
Trustees; Superintendent Board Chair
Secretarty - Treasurer Superintendent
All other employees Immedite Supervisor

7120-30 | Car Allowances

Eligibility:

  1. The district will pay a car allowance to employees who are authorized to use their personal vehicles on Board business.

Procedures:

  1. A mileage allowance, subject to Sections 2.2 and 2.3 below, will be paid on actual kilometres driven at the following rates:
    • For teachers, at the rate set in the collective agreement; and
    • For trustees and all other employees, at the rate set by the BC School Trustees Association.
  2. The maximum mileage allowance payable will be $280.00 per month for travel within the district.
  3. A record of mileage must be kept on a daily basis and the record should be available for inspection.
  4. A claim invoice must be submitted on Form 7120-30A. The claim form should be submitted each month, but may be submitted quarterly or semi-annually. Claim forms from a previous budget year will not be accepted.
  5. Employees whose travel on Board business exceeds 200 km per month, and who do not wish to record kilometres and claim under Section 2.1 above, can elect to receive a monthly allowance of $133.20. This allowance will be added to their regular pay cheque and will be a taxable benefit.

Insurance:

  1. Third Party Liability in the minimum amount of $2,000,000 must be carried for all vehicles used by employees in the performance of their duties.
  2. The incremental cost of additional insurance to:
    • Increase the Third Party Liability from $1,000,000 to $2,000,000, and/or
    • Change the ICBC insurance coverage rate class from “commuting” to “business” will be paid by the district once each year when submitted on the appropriate claim form.

 

REFERENCES:

7120 – Travel and Subsistence Allowance Policy

7120-30A – Invoice for Car Allowance Form


7120-30A | Car Allowance - Invoice

Reference Title View

Car Allowance Form

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7210 | Annual Budget Policy

POLICY 
The annual budget is a financial plan that reflects the vision of the school district and supports the educational program for the fiscal year. The Board believes that financial decisions should be based on district goals and there should be opportunities for meaningful input from all partner groups concerned with school district operations. 

REFERENCES 

  • School Act, 111 

7210-10 | Annual Budget Regulation

In preparing the annual budget, School District No. 52 will:

  1. Provide opportunities for public input from all groups concerned with the district operations.
  2. Provide an opportunity for district partner groups to meet individually with the Board of Education.
  3. Seek input from all district employees.
  4. Provide feedback to all groups providing input.
  5. Evaluate the impact of all proposed budget decisions on the district’s ability to enhance student achievement and meet district goals.
  6. Provide the Board of Education with options to consider in finalizing the budget.

7220 | Purchasing and Tendering Policy

POLICY 

The Board will employ ethical and transparent purchasing and tendering practices that ensure best value results on behalf of the school district. 

The Board will provide local vendors with an opportunity to bid on and supply goods and services to the school district at competitive pricing and terms, subject to the Board’s obligations under domestic and international trade agreements. 

All purchases of $250,000.00 or greater shall be subject to prior approval of the Board.


7220-10 | Purchasing of Supplies and Equipment

The requirements for written quotes or tenders for the purchase of supplies and equipment are as follows:

Procurement Method Total Value (CDN**) for
Procurement before Taxes
Means of Procurement Purchase Order (PO Approval Authority
Competitive Prices -
Recommended
$0 - $1,000 Pruchasing Card (p-card) n/a
Competitive Prices -
Recommended

40 - $2,000 for a supply item;

$0 - $5,0000 for Equipment repairs / refurbishment;

$0 - $5,000 for total order

Purchase Order (PO); or

Pay on Invoice (Cheque Request with receipts, where applicable)

Administrator,

Supervisor or

Director of Finance

Competitive Bids Required

Over $2,000 - $100,000 for a supply item;

Over $5,000 - $100,000 for Equipment repairs / refurbishment

PO - Buyer must obtain a minimum of 3 competitive quotes

Director of Finance or 

Secretary Teasurer

Open Competition Required Over $100,000 - $249,999

Request for Quotation (RFQ),
Request for Tender (RFT), or
Request for Proposal (RFP) and
PO - Buyer must obtain a minimum of 3 competitive quotes

Superintendent
Open Competition Required Over $250,000 Public RFQ/RFT and
PO-Buyer must obtain a minimum of 3 competitive quotes
Board of Education

At the discretion of the Secretary-Treasurer, exceptions may be made to the calling for tenders when local service is a factor or when standardization is desirable.

Appropriate specifications designed to provide as wide a selection as possible among competing items shall be drawn up and revised as circumstances require.

For purchases over $100,000, BC Bid is the preferred venue to post RFQ, RFT or RFP documents.

The contract will normally be placed with the lowest bidder provided that the bid is within the approved estimate and the bidder meets the specifications.

The purchase must be referred to the Board of Education if:

the recommended bid is in excess of the approved estimate for the item by more than 10%; or
the recommended bid is other than the lowest bid that meets the specifications; or
the bid is over $100,000 and is not within the approved operating budget; or
the bid is over $250,000.

Reference Title View

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7220-20 | Purchasing Card Regulation

Preamble 
Purchasing Cards enable holders to make direct purchases with monthly payments issued by the Board Office. This process reduces the amount of paperwork both for the school or department, and at the School Board Office. Purchases are charged to appropriate budget accounts.

 

Regulation

A.  Issue and Use of Cards

A Purchasing Card is issued to an individual and shows that person’s name and the name of the School District. The Cardholder is the only person entitled to use the Purchasing Card. They are also responsible for all purchases made with the Purchasing Card.

The Purchasing Card may be used for single item purchases up to the card transaction limits, and subject to the restrictions either implemented in the card provider system or outlined in the School District Policy and Procedures (see list below).

The per transaction and monthly maximum spending limits for a Purchase Card will be set based on the need of the cardholder. These limits can be adjusted.

Schools or departments using a Purchasing Card will be responsible for all authorized charges and fees related to the use of the Purchasing Card, including late payment charges incurred as a result of late-processing by the school or department. Individual Cardholders are not responsible for authorized use of the Purchasing Card.

Principals and Department Supervisors are responsible for requesting replacement cards, additional cards or changes to card limits through the Secretary-Treasurer.

Payment of Purchasing Card balances will be made automatically from the Board Office in the prescribed time limit.

 

B.    Restrictions on Card Use

The use of Purchasing Cards is subject to the following restrictions: 

  1. Only the person whose name appears on the Purchasing Card may use it. 
  2. The Purchasing Card must only be used to make authorized School District purchases within the established card limits and approved budgets.
  3. The Card cannot be used for any of the following:
  • Liquor
  • Cash advances
  • Services normally provided through Maintenance work orders
  • Single items with a value greater than the card transaction limit
  • Splitting purchases to avoid the card transaction limit
  • Hazardous materials
  • Extended rental or leasing of equipment

Every Cardholder must read and agree to the responsibilities and restrictions regarding the use of the Purchasing Cards and sign the Purchasing Card Form.

Inappropriate use of the purchase card will be considered a misappropriation of School District funds. Employees using cards inappropriately may be subject to disciplinary action, up to and including termination of employment.

 

C.    Card Security

To limit exposure or liability to the School District and the person named on the Purchasing Card, the Cardholder should be aware of the following requirements:

     1.  When not being used, the Purchasing Card should be kept in a secure location;

     2.  Use appropriate caution when using a Purchasing Card for online purchases;

     3.  If the Purchasing Card is lost or stolen, or if fraudulent charges appear on the card, the Cardholder must call the card provider and cancel the card. Lost or stolen Purchasing Cards can be reported 24 hours a day by calling the toll-free phone number supplied with the Purchasing Card;

  • In addition, advise the Secretary-Treasurer and the Secretary-Treasurer will follow up to ensure the card is cancelled and a replacement card is ordered;

     4.  Upon transfer, retirement or termination of employment from the school or department, the Cardholder must:

  • Reconcile all outstanding charges on the Purchasing Card, and
  • Immediately return the Purchasing Card to the Secretary-Treasurer; and

     5.  If requested, immediately return the Purchasing Card to the Secretary-Treasurer.

 

D.     Record Keeping

Each Cardholder will receive regular notification from the card provider when purchases are made using their Purchasing Card. Account codes must be entered regularly (normally weekly) for every transaction on a Purchasing Card. Uploaded receipts and packing slips must be linked to each transaction. This coding and linking is entered online using the card providers’ system. These records will then be available for standard audit purposes and to facilitate reconciliation and purchase verification. Upon confirmation that a legible record has been uploaded into the system, the original record can be disposed of.

The Secretary-Treasurer and the Director of Finance can be contacted for consultation on the use of the Purchasing Card and record keeping required for reconciliation and auditing purposes. The Director of Finance will have access to all billing reports to monitor each Cardholder’s use and reconciliation patterns of use to determine whether the Purchasing Card is being used in accordance with the policies.

Normal practices related to GST and PST apply to purchases made with a Purchasing Card.  Monthly statements are available to the Cardholder through the card provider’s online system.

 

E.    Disputed Charges

The card company must immediately be notified by the Cardholder of any disputed items. The School or Department is liable for any unauthorized use of the Purchasing Card until the Cardholder has reported notification of loss, theft or cancellation to the card Company. Please note that problems with the supplier (e.g. late deliveries) are not considered disputed items and must be settled directly with the supplier.

If assistance is needed with any questions or disputes about charges on the Purchasing Card, contact the Director of Finance or the Secretary-Treasurer.

 

Related Policy and Regulations

7120        Travel and Subsistence Allowance Policy
7120-10   Travel and Subsistence Allowance Regulation
7120-20   Travel and Subsistence Allowance – Approvals Regulation
7220        Purchasing and Tendering Policy
7220-20A Purchasing Card Form
7220-10   Purchasing of Supplies and Equipment Regulation
7310       School Funds Policy


7220-20A | Purchasing Card Form

Reference Title View

Purchasing Card Form

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7220-30 | Tendering for Maintenance and Renovation Projects

Reference Title View

Tendering for Maintenance and Renovation Projects

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7310 | School Funds Policy

POLICY 

All funds in any school are the responsibility of the school principal and are to be administered in accordance with the Regulations of this policy. 

REFERENCE 

School District Policy, Corporate Sponsorship and Access to Students 


7310-10 | School Funds (Fundraising)

FUND RAISING COORDINATION AND APPROVALS

  1. School funds may be raised for worthwhile, stated objectives by schools, student councils, school clubs, sports teams, school music groups or Parent Advisory Councils (PAC), provided that there is no undue intrusion on regular instructional time and there is no excessive use of instructional supplies.
  2. Fund raising methods must be in keeping with the general aims of public education, other Board policies and regulations, and the laws governing activities such as games of chance.  The methods must not offend good taste or impose on public generosity to the point where good community relations may be endangered.  The operation of raffles or lotteries by schools as a means of raising funds requires the permission of the Superintendent of Schools and an appropriate gaming license.
  3. In general, aid to individual schools should be derived from the local school area residents.
  4. Prior application must be made through the Principal to the Superintendent of Schools by school district organizations, including schools and student bodies, for any fund raising activities with a fundraising goal of $1,000 or more.  Form 7310‑10A shall be used for this purpose.
  5. Each school will coordinate the fund raising activities of its school related organizations, including the PAC, through its Principal.  All fundraising activities with a value less than $1,000 must be approved by the Principal.

 

OPERATION AND RECORDS

  1. All funds in a school, with the exception of PAC funds, are to be under the overall supervision of the Principal.
  2. All funds raised by a school or by any of its student groups, clubs, or organizations shall be placed in an account or accounts in a chartered bank or credit union under the name of the school, the student council or the PAC of the school.
  3. Each fund is to be operated on a trust fund basis with its own general ledger account to track cash receipts and cash disbursements.
  4. Numbered receipts are to be issued for all cash received.
  5. Numbered cheques are to be issued for all expenditures.
  6. There shall be two signing officers for each school account, one of whom shall be the Principal of the school.
  7. The expenditure of school funds shall be approved by the Principal of the school after consulting with the appropriate group, or in the case of student council funds, by a majority vote of the student council.
  8. Bank reconciliations are to be prepared each month.
  9. The May 31 bank reconciliation and bank statement must be provided to the Director of Finance before June 30 so that they will be available to the district’s auditors.
  10. School trust funds are subject to audit annually by the Secretary-Treasurer or his designate.

 

Reference:

7310             School Funds Policy

7310-10A      Fundraising Approval Application Form


7310-10A | Fundraising Approval Application Form

Reference Title View

Fundraising Approval Application Form

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7410 | Audit Services Policy

POLICY 

The Board shall authorize independent auditing services for the school district, with an annual renewable term not to exceed five (5) years. 

The continuing use of a particular independent audit firm will depend upon a favourable evaluation of services. 

A tender bid process will be used to select an independent audit firm. 


7410-10 | Audit Services

Audit services provided on a continuing basis to or on behalf of the District by an independent auditor shall be authorized over a renewable term not to exceed five (5) years. 

The continuing use of a particular audit firm will depend upon a favourable evaluation of services after not more than two (2) years. 

A tender bid process will be used to select an independent audit firm. 

Factors to be considered in the choice or continued use of an audit firm shall include: 

  • Capability of Audit Firm
  • Capability of Audit Team (Assigned Staff)
  • Proposed Audit Strategy
  • Price